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Full text of "Alabama College Bulletin: 1964-1965"

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Alabama 
College 



A STATE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



MONTEVALLO, ALABAMA 




BULLETIN 



1964- 1965 



A SUMMARY OF INFORMATION 

Admission Requirements. Graduates of accredited high schools are eligible for 
admission upon presentation of satisfactory ACT scores and references. An entrance 
examination must be successfully passed by non-graduates or graduates of unaccredited 
high schools. All freshman applicants are required to present satisfactory scores on 
the ACT Test. Three units of English are required of all students, and at least one 
unit of algebra and preferably a unit of plane geometry are suggested for those who 
plan to take mathematics in college. For admission requirements for transfer students, 
see page 12. 

Write the Director of Admissions for catalog, application blank, and information 
concerning admission to the College. 

College Calendar. 
1964-1965 

First Semester September 14, 1964-January 22, 1965 

Second Semester January 26, 1965-May 30, 1965 

Registration for classes takes place on the first day of each semester or term. 

Cost for 1964-1965 Semester Session 

Room, board and laundry $270.00 $540.00 

Sales tax on board 5.72 11.44 

College fees 145.00 290.00 

Total $420.72 $841.44 

Special music fees are charged for private music lessons: $50.00 a semester for 
two lessons a week, and $25.00 to $28.00 for 1 lesson a week. Students from other 
states are charged an additional fee of $105.00 per semester, or $210.00 per session. 
In addition to the above charges, each student will need to purchase his own books 
and personal supplies. 

Inquiries concerning the charges and payments may be addressed to the Treasurer. 

Employment, Scholarships, and Loans. There are a number of partial scholarships 
available for deserving and needy students, and limited opportunities exist for part- 
time work and financial loans. 

Correspondence concerning financial aid should be addressed to the Dean of 
Men. 

Housing and Dining Facilities. Students reside in six college-owned residence 
halls on the campus, and meals are served in the College Cafeteria. Rooms and apart- 
ments are available in the town of Montevallo for married students. Commuting stu- 
dents do not pay room, board, and laundry, but they pay all other fees at the be- 
ginning of the semester. 

Undergraduate Curricula. Four degrees are offered, based upon the completion of 
four years of undergraduate study (130 semester hours and 130 grade points and a 
minimum of 130 weeks of attendance). They are: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence, Bachelor of Music, and the Bachelor of Music Education Degrees. 

In addition to standard liberal arts courses, including Art, Biology, English, Geol- 
ogy, Foreign Languages, Speech and Dramatics, Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics, Psy- 
chology, Philosophy, and Social Sciences, specialized instruction is offered in the follow- 
ing professional fields: Business Administration and Secretarial Administration; Health 
and Physical Educaton; Home Economics, with majors in vocational education, institu- 
tion economics, and retail economics; Medical Technology; Music; Speech Correction; 
Teacher Training for elementary and secondary teachers; and pre-professional training 
in Medicine, Dentistry, Law, Engineering, and Social Work. 

Graduate Curriculum. The degree of Master of Arts in Teaching is offered. 

Correspondence concerning the undergraduate and graduate curricula and other 
academic matters should be addressed to the Dean of the College. 

Accreditation. Alabama College is fully accredited by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools and the Association of Alabama Colleges. For a complete list 
of other accreditation and affiliation agencies, see page 9. 



This bulletin presents full information on Alabama College. Every effort will 
be made by the College, its officers and faculty, to fulfill and carry out the pro- 
visions, regulations and obligations stated herein. However, Alabama College re- 
serves the right to alter or change the conditions, regulations and requirements as 
stated herein at any time and without notice. 



Vol. LVI JULY, 1964 No. 2 



BULLETIN 

of 

ALABAMA COLLEGE 

A State College of Liberal Arts 
Montevallo, Alabama 




Announcements for the 

Sixty-Ninth Session 

1964-1965 



Published quarterly by the College and entered as Second-Class Matter in the 
Post Office at Montevallo, Alabama, under Act of March 19, 1914. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

SUMMARY OF INFORMATION Inside Cover 

COLLEGE CALENDAR vi 

LOCATION AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES 1 

HISTORY AND PRESENT STATUS 8 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS AND 

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 10 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 15 

STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 28 

SPECIAL SERVICES 34 

DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 37 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 82, 111 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 104 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 114 

DIRECTORY 118 

INDEX 131 

SUMMER SCHOOL STATEMENT Inside Back Cover 




KEY TO THE MAP 
1. Palmer Hall 

Main Residence Hall 

Main Residence Dining Hall 

Anna Irvin Hall 

(Dining Hall) 

The Tower 

Edward Houston Wills 

Memorial Library 

7. King House 

8. Bloch Hall 

9. Comer Hall 

10. To: Flower Hill, Presidents 
Home and Outdoor Theatre 

11. King House Parking Area 

12. King Family Cemetery 



13. Comer Hall Parking Area 

14. Nursery School 

15. Swimming Pool 

16. Tennis Courts 

17. Bibb Graves Hall 

18. Physics-Mathematics 
Building 

19. Pottery Shop 

20. Geology Building 

21. Temporary Storage Building 

22. New Residence Hall for 
Men Parking Area 

23. Intramural Sports Area 

24. Intercollegiate Sports Area 

25. New Residence Hall for Men 

26. Operations Building 



27. 


College Laundry 


43 


28. 


Power House 


44 


29. 


Ramsay Hall 


45 


30. 


Tutwiler Hall 


46 


31. 


Hanson Hall 




32. 


Tutwiler Hall Parking Area 


47 


33. 


Peterson Hall 




34. 


Reynolds Hall 


48 


35. 


College Post Office 


49 


36. 


Calkins Hall 


50 


37. 


Calkins Hall Parking Area 


51 


38. 


Ramsay Hall Parking Area 


52 


39. 


Speech and Hearing Clinic 


53 


40. 


Temporary Faculty Residence 




41. 


Campus Police Headquarters 


54 


42. 


Flag Pole 





43. Napier Hall 

Napier Hall Parking Area 
Faculty Apartment 
Jeter Building, 
Elementary School 
Alice Boyd Building, 
Elementary School 
Junior and Senior High School 
Palmer Hall Parking Area 
Home Management House 
Temporary Residence 
Social Sciences Building 
Road to College Lake, Golf 
Course, Faculty Apartments 
Physical Education Building 
(under construction) 



1964 



JANUARY 



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FEBRUARY 















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MARCH 



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JUNE 





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AUGUST 















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SEPTEMBER 







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OCTOBER 











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NOVEMBER 



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DECEMBER 







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80 


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5 
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26 



1965 



JANUARY 



3 
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M 


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FEBRUARY 





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MARCH 





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APRIL 











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JULY 



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AUGUST 



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SEPTEMBER 









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OCTOBER 













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NOVEMBER 





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DECEMBER 









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4 
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THE COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1964 




September 


12 


September 


13 


September 


14-16 


September 


16 


September 


17 


September 


24 


October 


1 


October 


12 


October 


24 


November 


6 


November 


24 


November 


30 


December 


18 


1965 




January 


4 


January 


15-20 


January 


26 


January 


27-28 



January 27 



January 


29 


February 


4 


February 


11 


February 


18-20 


March 


26 


March 


26 


April 
April 
May 


5 

10 

24-28 



May 



Saturday. Meeting of staff, 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday. Residence halls open, noon meal will be 
served. 
14-16 Monday-Wednesday. Orientation of new stu- 
dents and registration of all students. 

Wednesday. Last day for registration without 
paying late registration fee. 

Thursday. Classes begin at 8:00 a.m. 

Thursday. Last day to drop or add courses with- 
out $2.00 charge. 

Thursday. Last day to drop courses without 
loss of credit. 

Monday. Founder's Day. 

Saturday. Condition examinations. 

Friday. Mid-semester. 

Tuesday. Thanksgiving holidays begin at the 
close of the class day. 

Monday. Classes resume after Thanksgiving 
holidays. 

Friday. Christmas holidays begin at the close of 
the class day. 



Monday. Classes resume after Christmas holi- 
days. 

Friday-Wednesday. Final examinations for first 
semester. 

Tuesday. Registration for second semester. 

Wednesday-Thursday. Tests for entering fresh- 
men. 

Wednesday. Classes begin for upper classmen 
8:00 a.m. Last day for registration without 
paying late registration fee. 

Friday. Classes begin for entering freshmen 8:00 
a.m. 

Thursday. Last day to drop or add courses with- 
out $2.00 charge. 

Thursday. Last day to drop courses without 
loss of credit. 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday. College Night and 
Homecoming. 

Friday. Mid-semester. 

Friday. Spring holidays begin at the close of 
the class day. 

Monday. Classes resume after spring holidays. 

Saturday. Condition examinations. 

Monday -Friday. Final examinations for second 
semester. 

Sunday. Commencement exercises. 



30 



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LOCATION AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES 

LOCATION 

Located at Montevallo, a town of about 2500 population 
near the exact center of the state, Alabama College is accessible 
by railroad and paved highways. Montevallo is served by state 
highways 25, 119 and 155 and is just seven miles off U. S. 31 and 
65, major north-south highways which run through Birmingham 
and Montgomery. Montevallo is 32 miles south of Birmingham, 
via U. S. 31 to State 119 from Alabaster to Montevallo. It is 68 
miles north of Montgomery. 

MAIN CAMPUS 

Alabama College's 106-acre main campus is considered to be 
one of the beauty spots of the South. Spacious lawns, stately trees 
and an unusal number of flowers and shrubs contribute to the 
natural attractiveness of the campus. More than thirty buildings 
are included in the physical facilities of the College. 

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS AND LABORATORIES 

Buildings 

Bloch Hall was named in honor of Sol D. Bloch, of Camden, 
Alabama, who was author of the bill establishing the College and 
who served continuously on the Board of Trustees from its or- 
ganization until 1919. The building, which was opened in 1915, 
contains classrooms, departmental offices and laboratories, and 
has recently been completely modernized. 

Calkins Hall, completed in 1917, was named in memory of 
the late Charles Rendell Calkins, director of music from 1913 to 
1920. It contains the office of the Chairman of the Department 
of Music, classrooms, studios, practice rooms, and a recital hall. 

Comer Hall, named for Braxton Bragg Comer, Governor of 
Alabama from 1907 to 1911, was completed and dedicated in 
1940. This is a classroom and departmental office building. 

Bibb Graves Hall, converted from a small airplane hangar 
into the gymnasium, was completed in 1938 and later named 
Bibb Graves Hall. The building, located on the lower campus 
adjacent to the sports field, provides limited indoor space for 
the program of the Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation. A new gymnasium will be completed by the fall 
semester, 1964. The new gymnasium will contain a regulation 
basketball court, two non-regulation basketball courts, six bad- 
minton courts, three volley ball courts, and in addtion will pro- 
vide dressing and showering facilities, and office space for the 
faculty of the Physical Education Department. 

Geology, a white frame building containing a classroom and 
geology laboratory was provided at the beginning of the 1962- 
1963 session. 



2 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

King House, erected in 1823, was the "mansion house" of 
Edmund King, the first owner of the land on which the College 
is built. Now used for offices of the Psychology Department, 
King House is said to be the first brick house and the first house 
with glass windows in this part of the State. 

Margaret Ann McCall Swimming Pool was completed in 
1951. As a tribute to her devotion to the College and the De- 
partment of Physical Education, the modern indoor-outdoor nata- 
torium, in October 1959, was dedicated to the memory of Dr. 
Margaret McCall who for 21 years was Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. The McCall 
Pool provides for year-round instructional and recreational swim- 
ming for students and faculty. 

Nursery School is housed in a new modern brick building 
located adjacent to the indoor swimming pool. The structure was 
completed for occupancy in February, 1955. It has play rooms, 
sleeping rooms, dining rooms, kitchen, and ample play facilities 
for approximately fifteen children. 

Thomas Waverly V aimer Hall, which bears the name of the 
third president of the College, was opened in 1930. It contains 
administration offices, an auditorium seating approximately fif- 
teen hundred, excellent stage facilities, and one of the great in- 
stitutional pipe organs of the South. 

Physics Building. In the fall of 1963 the fully renovated 
maintenance building was taken over by the Physics Department. 
It provides for an auditorium-lecture room and two fully equipped 
physics laboratories and offices for professors. 

Practice Home is an eight-room cottage- type house, with 
room for six girls and a director. This serves as a laboratory for 
senior students in home economics. 

Residential Speech and Hearing Clinic with dormitory, din- 
ing and therapy facilities, is attractively housed in a residence 
adjoining the campus. 

Social Science Building, a frame structure located just within 
the East Gate, provides offices for members of the Social Science 
Department. 

Laboratories 

Art. Studios for painting, designing, and general art courses 
are located on the second floor of Comer Hall. The Pottery Lab- 
oratory is located in the same building with the Physics Building. 

Biology. Laboratories for the Department of Biology occupy 
one floor in Bloch Hall. These laboratories contain the facili- 
ties and equipment needed for the courses offered in biology. A 
fully equipped radiation biology laboratory is available. Five 



LOCATION AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES 3 

small research laboratories are also available for staff members 
and students who are doing an undergraduate research problem. 
A greenhouse for the use of the department adjoins the labora- 
tories. 

Chemistry. Laboratories of the Chemistry Department are lo- 
cated on the third floor of Bloch Hall and occupy seven rooms 
in this building. Each laboratory is equipped with standard furni- 
ture, consisting of Alberlene stone-top desks. The two hundred 
and twenty-eight student lockers supplied by these desks are 
ample for all the work offered in this department. The chemis- 
try laboratories are equipped with water baths, hot air ovens, 
hoods, and other standard laboratory equipment. 

Home Economics. Home Economics laboratories are located, 
with one exception, on the first floor of Bloch Hall. There are 
two clothing laboratories at the north end of the building. The 
equipment of these laboratories includes various types of sewing 
machines and a Scott tensile-strength testing machine. 

The food laboratories are located in the south end of the 
building. Each is arranged on the unit kitchen plan with dif- 
ferent types of equipment in each kitchen. The laboratories are 
connected with a pantry. 

A combination home-furnishing laboratory and reading room 
is located in the center of the building. Here are found periodi- 
cals pertaining to home economics. 

The household equipment laboratory is located in the old 
Nursery School. Here are facilities for testing various household 
electrical equipment as well as equipment for repairing and fin- 
ishing furniture. 

Theatre Art. The Scene Shop located in the Operations Build- 
ing provides the necessary facilities for laboratory work in scenery 
construction and painting as well as scene design. Stage light- 
ing laboratory work is done on the stage of Palmer Theatre. 

LIBRARY 

The Edward Houston Wills Memorial Library, erected in 
1922-1923 and enlarged in 1939, is centrally located on the cam- 
pus. The reading rooms provide accommodations for 210 readers, 
and the book collection now numbers 84,000 volumes. The se- 
lection of titles is primarily for the use of students and faculty 
in the courses offered, though provision is made for recreational 
and cultural reading. The facilities of the library are available 
to college students, faculty and staff, to residents of Montevallo, 
and to alumni. Although supplying materials to people through- 
out the state is limited to alumni and to interlibrary loans, the 
resources of the library are at the disposal of all who come for 
assistance or who write for information. 



4 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Six hundred and twenty-nine magazines and seventeen news- 
papers are currently received. Subscription to periodical indexes 
include Applied Science and Technology, Art Index, Business 
Periodicals Index, Education Index, International Index, Readers 9 
Guide to Periodical Literature, The New York Times Index, and 
Public Affairs Information Service. 

With the exception of a few special collections, books are 
charged for two weeks to registrants. During the fall and spring 
semesters the library is open as follows: 

Monday-Friday 7:50 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m.-12:00 n. 

1:30 p.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m.- 4:30 p.m. 

6:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 

RESIDENCES AND CAFETERIA 

Hanson Hall was named for the late Weenona Hanson, 
whose husband, the late Mr. Victor Hanson, contributed sub- 
stantially toward its erection in 1929. It accommodates approxi- 
mately 190 students. 

Main Dormitory comprises three distinct units, connected by 
cross halls. The three wings are named for distinguished teachers 
who served the institution for many years. The east wing is 
known as Mary Goode Stallworth Hall, the central wing as Anne 
Kennedy Hall, the west wing as Elizabeth Haley Hall. This resi- 
dence contains parlors, reception halls, and rooms for approxi- 
mately 420 students. 

Napier Hall was named for Doctor Thomas Hewell Napier 
who served as Dean of Alabama College for 26 years. It is a 
modern air conditioned building and houses 178 students. 

A new residence hall was completed on the lower west side 
of the campus in the fall of 1961. It accommodates 202 students. 

Ramsay Hall was named for Mrs. Janet Erskine Ramsay, the 
mother of Mr. Erskine Ramsay, of Birmingham. Mr. Ramsay 
gave $100,000 toward the erection of the building. It was occu- 
pied first in 1925 and accommodates approximately 120 students. 

Tutwiler Hall, named for Julia Strudwick Tutwiler, was com- 
pleted and dedicated in 1940. This hall provides 102 students 
with a modern and unusually attractive campus residence, and 
has a large recreation room in the basement. 

Anna Irvin Hall, the College cafeteria, named in honor of 
Miss Anna Irvin, who served the College for 32 years as dieti- 
tian, is located just behind Main Residence. 



LOCATION AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES 5 

OTHER BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES 

Athletic Field. The first unit of the athletic field, the base- 
ball diamond with backstop, bleachers and dugouts, was first 
used in the Spring of 1958. It is located across the road from 
the Sports Field. 

Board Room, completed in the fall of 1961, is located in 
Main Hall. This room is provided for the regular meeting of 
the Board of Trustees and for such special meetings as are 
authorized by the President. 

Camp House, completed in the Spring of 1929, is located on 
a wooded hillside overlooking the college lake about a mile from 
the campus. It was erected and furnished through the funds of 
the Recreation Association and is maintained by this organization 
under the direction of the Department of Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation for the use of all students in college. A 
large living room, fireplace, kitchen, dining room, and sleeping 
porch offer overnight facilities for students and faculty chap- 
erons. The Camp House is the week-end retreat of student groups 
who want a short, inexpensive outing. 

Pasteurization Plant. The college has one of the most mod- 
ern sanitary plants for the pasteurization and homogenization of 
the Grade A milk which is used in the college cafeteria. 

Faculty Club House, located one-half mile from the campus 
on a hillside overlooking the twenty-eight-acre College Lake, was 
completed in the Spring of 1952. Membership in the Faculty Club 
is open to all members of the staff and faculty. 

Faculty Housing. The college owns two apartment houses 
and two houses which may be rented by members of the fac- 
ulty and staff. 

Fire Protection for campus buildings is provided by sprinkler 
systems, chemical fire extinguishers and other standard firefight- 
ing equipment. Fire drills are conducted each semester. A fire 
truck is located in the Operations Building. 

Golf Course. The Alabama College Golf Course is located 
less than a mile from the main campus. The course is maintained 
and operated by the Alabama College Golf Club and the Ala- 
bama College Administration. It is administered and managed 
under the direction of the Chairman of the Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation Department. Alabama College students 
may play free of charge and the course is used for instructional 
as well as recreational purposes. The Alabama College Golf Club 
is a member of the United States Golf Association. The nine- 
hole course is the site for the Alabama Collegiate Conference 
Tournament, and for intramural and club tournaments through- 
out the year. 



6 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

College Lake, located one-half mile from the campus, covers 
approximately twenty-eight acres. The lake has been stocked with 
fish and is available for fishing and boating. The Boat House, 
providing space for six canoes, is located adjacent to the lake. 

Laundry, adjacent to Power House, serves students, staff and 
departments of the College. 

Operations Building. A modern fire-proof operations build- 
ing was completed in the fall of 1962-1963. This building con- 
tains shops, offices for operations personnel, parts storage and a 
scenery construction shop for the College Theatre. 

Peterson Hall, the College Infirmary, erected in 1913, was 
named in honor of the second president of the College, Dr. Fran- 
cis Marion Peterson. 

Power House supplies heat to all campus buildings and is 
located on the lower campus. 

President's Residence, of colonial architecture, was erected in 
1926 on Flowerhill, the highest point on the northern end of 
the campus. 

Reynolds Hall was erected in 1851 on a lot donated by Ed- 
mund King, and named for Captain Henry Clay Reynolds, the 
first president of the College. In 1939 Reynolds Hall was re- 
modeled and converted into a Student Union Building, a center 
for the organizational and social activities of the students, faculty 
and alumni of the College. It houses, on the first floor, the 
Alumni, Education, Philosophy and Religion, and Speech offices; 
offices of the Student Government Association, and the Assistant 
to the Dean of Women; a reception hall, loafing porch, tea room 
and supply store, and kitchen. Reynolds Theatre, the Student 
Christian Association office, student publication offices, several 
classrooms, and the broadcasting studios of the College Radio Sta- 
tion are located on the second floor. 

A large part of the equipment for this building was fur- 
nished by the Alumni Association. 

Main Hall, located on the ground floor of Main Dormi- 
tory, is so constructed it may be divided into three separate 
rooms. These may be used for special meetings and social activi- 
ties. 

The Tower, traditional landmark at Alabama College, has 
been completely renovated and now houses the offices of the 
student publications. In the fall of 1963 a Schulmerich Carrillon 
was installed in the Tower — the gift of an anonymous donor, it 
was dedicated to the memory of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Haley 
Moore, a teacher at Alabama College from 1896 to 1912. 



LOCATION AND PHYSICAL FACILITIES 7 

Sports Field. Located on the lower campus, it provides multi- 
purpose area for outdoor badminton, volleyball, softball, touch 
football, soccer, and a practice golf range. Located near the 
sports field are the tennis courts. The archery range is across the 
road, diagonally from the New Men's Residence Hall. 

Supply Store and Tea Room are maintained in Reynolds 
Hall for the convenience of students. 

Water Supply of the College is declared by health authorities 
to be excellent. Spring water is purified by a filtration plant 
completed in 1936. 

THEATRES 

Palmer Theatre is generally acknowledged to be one of the 
best equipped and most acoustically perfect theatres in the entire 
South. Its seating capacity is approximately 1,500. The stage, 
33'x67', with a gridiron of some 40' makes for flexibility and 
quick changes. A large Ariel Davis dimmer board controls the 
lighting. In the basement are a large make-up laboratory, a ward- 
robe and dressing rooms. 

Reynolds Theatre, located in Reynolds Hall, provides ex- 
cellent facilities for rehearsal and laboratory purposes. It has a 
stage of 24'xl7'xl7', a Capital Portable Switchboard, and a seat- 
ing capacity of 300. 

For training in the scenic aspects of the theatre, there is a 
workshop for the making and painting of scenery located in the 
new Operations Building. 

A wardrobe of some three thousand items, consisting mainly 
of Greek, Elizabethan, Chinese, Japanese, and 18th Century gar- 
ments, is housed in Palmer basement and in Reynolds. 



8 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

HISTORY AND PRESENT STATUS 

HISTORY 

Alabama College was established as the result of a bill intro- 
duced in the State Senate in 1892 by Sol D. Bloch, of Camden. 
The bill was steered through the House by John McQueen, of 
Birmingham, and was passed the following year. On January 1, 
1896, Montevallo was selected as the site of the College because 
of the town's location near the geographical center of the state, 
its healthful surroundings, and a substantial gift of cash and 
property by its citizens. 

The school opened its doors on October 12, 1896, with Cap- 
tain Henry Clay Reynolds, of Montevallo, as president, a faculty 
of six, and a student enrollment of one hundred forty-five. The 
only physical equipment was Reynolds Hall, erected in 1851. 
Reynolds today is one of the stateliest buildings on the Alabama 
College campus. 

Management of the College from the beginning has been 
vested in a Board of Trustees composed of the Governor, who 
is its president, the State Superintendent of Education, and ten 
members appointed by the Governor, one from each of the eight 
Congressional Districts, and two from the State-at-Large. 

During the sixty-eight years since its opening, the College 
has had nine presidents. The first, Captain Henry Clay Reynolds, 
had been a lieutenant in the Confederate States Army, and at the 
time of his election was a merchant and planter. In 1899 he was 
succeeded by Dr. Francis Marion Peterson, Professor of Ancient 
Languages at Southern University, Greensboro (now Birmingham- 
Southern). The third president, Dr. Thomas Waverly Palmer, be- 
fore coming to Montevallo in 1907, had been Dean and Professor 
of Mathematics at the University of Alabama. In 1926 Dr. O. C. 
Carmichael, Dean of the College since 1922, became the fourth 
president. Dr. Arthur Fort Harman, former State Superintendent 
of Education, served the College as its fifth president from 1935 
to September 1, 1947, when he was succeeded by Dr. John Tyler 
Caldwell, its sixth president. On July 1, 1952, Dr. Caldwell was 
succeeded by Dr. F. Edward Lund, former Dean of Florence 
State College, Florence, Alabama. In August 1957, Dr. Howard 
Mitchell Phillips, Sr., Dean of the Graduate School, Emory Uni- 
versity, Atlanta, Georgia, became the eighth president of the Col- 
lege. Dr. Delos P. Culp, President of Livingston State College, 
succeeded Dr. Phillips. On June 1, 1963, Dr. Culp became the 
ninth president of the college. 

In the fall of 1955, President Lund recognized the need for 
the College to enlarge its services to the state and recommended 
to the Trustees that the institution become a coeducational liberal 
arts college, offering standard courses in the Arts and Sciences, 



HISTORY AND PRESENT STATUS 9 

and in the various professional fields in which the College had 
historically pioneered in service. In response to this recommenda- 
tion, which was approved unanimously by the Trustees, Faculty, 
Student Body and Alumnae, the State Legislature on January 17, 
1956, passed the necessary enabling legislation to permit the Col- 
lege to admit qualified male students, and confer appropriate 
degrees upon the satisfactory completion of the required course of 
study. The College thus opened its sixty-first session as a coedu- 
cational liberal arts college, and passed another milestone in its 
historical development. 

PRESENT STATUS 

Alabama College has developed from its beginning as a girls' 
school with a curriculum covering high school subjects, special 
work in commercial courses, normal training, music, and domestic 
arts, to a standard co-educational college of liberal arts and sci- 
ences, granting undergraduate degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bache- 
lor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Science 
and a graduate degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. 

Objectives 
Alabama College endeavors to give students a well-rounded 
general education which will enable them to understand and 
appreciate the background of our civilization and to predict 
the future in terms of that background and the present. In addi- 
tion, the College offers such special preparation as may be needed 
to prepare the student for a business or professional career. In 
doing this, the first two years for all students are devoted pri- 
marily to the broad basic courses in the liberal arts and sciences. 
The last two years emphasize the student's major interests, in 
preparation for the profession or business he desires to follow, 
along with some further work in the arts and sciences. 

Alabama College continues to uphold and strengthen high 
standards of scholarship as it has done in the past. 

Accreditation 
In 1925 the College was admitted to membership in the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, and in 1928 to 
the Association of American Colleges. In 1931 it was approved 
by the American Association of University Women, and in 
the same year the School of Music was accredited by the Na- 
tional Association of Schools of Music. The College was granted 
membership in the American Council on Education and the 
Southern University Conference in 1935, and was placed on the 
approved list of the Association of American Universities in 
1942. It holds memberships in the Association of Alabama Col- 
leges, the National Association of Business Teacher Training In- 
stitutions, the Council on Social Work Education, and the South- 
ern Humanities Conference. 



Historic Reynolds Half, Erected in 1857 





The College's Scenic 28-acre Lake 





Napier Hall — Men's Resident 



Wills Memorial Library — College Tower in Background 



Palmer Hall — Administrative Offices and Auditorium 




10 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS AND REGISTRATION 

PROCEDURES 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Every candidate for admission to Alabama College must have 
a satisfactory citizenship record. The College admits only those 
applicants who, in the opinion of officers responsible for admis- 
sion, will reflect credit upon the College both during enrollment 
and after graduation. The right is reserved to refuse admission to 
those whose physical or mental development would render them 
unable to pursue satisfactorily a course of study leading to a 
degree, to those who lack moral character, and to those whose 
presence on the campus would in any way militate against the 
orderly and consistent pursuit of learning. 

Information will be sought from various sources to aid the 
College in making its decision regarding each applicant. Letters of 
reference will be required and other confidential information will 
be requested. Qualifying examinations may be required at the dis- 
cretion of the Director of Admissions. 

Forms for making application will be supplied by the Ad- 
missions Office upon oral or written request. Freshman applica- 
tions should be submitted as soon as possible after September 15 
of the applicant's senior year in high school. Transfer applications 
should be submitted as soon as the applicant develops an interest 
in attending Alabama College. All applicants must submit appli- 
cations at least ten days before the opening of the semester in 
which they wish to enter, and all papers necessary for an admis- 
sion decision for the applicant involved, must be in the Office 
of the Director of Admissions not later than registration day as 
announced by the College. 

A $20.00 deposit must accompany applications from appli- 
cants desiring residence accommodations, and a $10.00 deposit 
must accompany applications from those who do not require col- 
lege housing. 

Applicants who are otherwise qualified may be admitted on 
the following bases: 

Freshmen 

1. High School Graduates. A freshman applicant must present 
a satisfactory record from an accredited high school snowing 
credit for a minimum of fifteen acceptable units from a four- 
year school, or a minimum of eleven acceptable units from a 
three-year secondary school which required for admission the com- 
pletion of a three-year junior high school program. The units of- 
fered for admission must include three units in English, and not 
more than four of the fifteen from a four-year school nor more 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 11 

than three of the eleven from a three-year school may be in 
vocational subjects. 

Students who plan to enter college should take at least one 
year of algebra and plane geometry in high school. The score 
made on the test in mathematics will determine the course in 
mathematics to which a student will be admitted, and will also 
determine whether or not any student will be admitted to courses 
in the physical sciences without first taking basic mathematics. 

At least two units in the same foreign language must be pre- 
sented when language is offered to fulfill a part of the entrance 
requirements. Students who present two units in a language will 
be tested and placed in a course commensurate with their abili- 
ties. Such students, if placed by test scores or by personal choice 
in a freshman level language course, will receive only one semes- 
ter hour for each freshman level course taken if they continue in 
the same language taken in high school. If a language other than 
that taken in high school is selected by the student, no loss of 
credit occurs when the beginning course is taken. 

It is the responsibility of each applicant to have an of- 
ficial transcript of high school credits presented according to 
instructions given by the Office of Admissions after application 
for admission is submitted. No final admission decision can be 
made until a complete transcript has been received. Meeting 
minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to Alabama 
College. 

2. Alabama College Testing Program. Alabama College re- 
quires satisfactory scores on the test sponsored by the Alabama 
College Testing Program, an affiliate of the American College 
Testing Program, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa. Students desiring ad- 
mission to Alabama College should take this test as early as pos- 
sible, preferably at the November offering, in their senior high 
school year and specify that scores be mailed to the Office of Ad- 
missions, Alabama College, Montevallo, Alabama. 

3. Medical Report. The College requires that a satisfactory 
medical report be submitted to the Office of Admissions on a 
form which will be mailed to each person who applies for ad- 
mission. 

4. Early Admission of Freshmen. Exceedingly able and ma- 
ture students whose school officials, parents and others from whom 
the college may seek information believe they can profit by be- 
ginning their college education a year early may be admitted. 
Minimum requirements include completion of the junior year in 
high school with a grade point average of at least 3.5 (A = 4, 
B = 3, C = 2, D = l, F = 0), achievement of a composite score on 
the American College Test which would place the applicant in 



12 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

the 90th percentile or above on Alabama College norms for en- 
tering freshmen, favorable recommendations from school offi- 
cials and other persons designated by the Director of Admissions, 
and personal interviews. 

Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admis- 
sion under this provision. The Director of Admissions may seek 
any evaluation which may seem appropriate in the case of each 
individual applicant. 

Students desiring to make application under this provision 
should take the American College Test in February or April of 
their junior year, or in June after the completion of their junior 
year. They should get in touch with the Director of Admissions, 
Alabama College, before the end of their junior year, or as early 
as they decide to apply under this plan. 

5. Irregular Admission of Freshmen 

A. Students Who Are Not Graduates of Accredited High 
Schools. Graduates of non-accredited secondary schools may be 
admitted by presenting promising ACT scores and above average 
high school records. 

B. Special Students. High school graduates 20 years of age 
and over who have not attended another college may audit 
courses at Alabama College without satisfying all entrance re- 
quirements. No grades or credit are recorded for an audited 
course. Permission to audit a course shall be subject to the ap- 
proval of the Dean and the instructor, and to space limitations. 

Transfer Students 

A student who wishes to transfer from another institution 
must present an official transcript of his previous record, to- 
gether with a statement of honorable dismissal from that institu- 
tion. The College further reserves the right to require letters of 
recommendation certifying to a satisfactory conduct record for 
all students who transfer from other institutions. 

The following academic regulations apply to students who 
have attended other institutions: 

1. A minimum of an overall C average on all work pre- 
viously attempted must have been attained. 

2. A student who is on scholastic or any other type of pro- 
bation or who has been dropped from another institution cannot 
be admitted. 

3. Students transferring to Alabama College from other col- 
leges may not transfer more than 65 semester hours. Grade point 
averages of transfer students are calculated solely on the basis of 
grades earned at Alabama College. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 13 

4. All credits must be on file and approved before the stu- 
dent ss officially admitted. It is the responsibility of the student 
to see that the credits are transferred. 

RE-ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

Students returning to the College after an absence of four 
or more years are required to conform to the requirements of 
the latest catalog. 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

Students may enter at the beginning of either semester or at 
the beginning of summer school. 

For the first semester of the 1964-1965 session, students will 
begin registering at 8:00 a.m., Monday, September 14, 1964. 

For the second semester, registration will begin at 8:00 a.m., 
Tuesday, January 26, 1965. 

Students must complete their enrollment at the Cashier's Of- 
fice by September 16 for the first semester and January 27 for 
the second semester, or pay a late registration fee of $5.00. 

No student will be permitted to enroll after two weeks of 
the opening of school during a regular session or after the be- 
ginning of classes in the summer session without special permis- 
sion of the Dean of the College. 

IDENTIFICATION CARD 

Any student who enrolls for work at Alabama College is re- 
quired to have an official student Identification Card. Students 
will be furnished information as to the time and place to be 
photographed. Registration is not complete until this has been 
done. 

MOTOR VEHICLE REGISTRATION 

Any member of the student body, staff, or faculty who oper- 
ates a motor vehicle on the Alabama College campus must register 
it and secure a sticker, and must display this sticker in plain view 
on either windshield or rear glass of the vehicle. For students, 
registration is not complete until this has been done. 

FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 

In order to assist freshmen in adjusting to the college en- 
vironment, an orientation program is arranged. On registration 
day, September 14, members of the Freshman Class will be given 
a program which they should follow. This plan will include li- 
brary lectures, special lectures by members of the administration, 
and general ability and diagnostic tests. The Student Government 



14 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Association will give instruction in student regulations and stu- 
dent tradition, and various campus groups will arrange social 
gatherings to afford an opportunity for freshmen to get acquaint- 
ed. 

HOUSING 

Most of the college students reside in residences on the 
campus. All students, with the exception of married students, ivho 
do not live at home with parents or close relatives are required 
to live in a college residence. 

Rooms are assigned in the order in which applications are 
received, and therefore it is important that the applicant return 
the application for admission and $20.00 fee as early as possible 
to insure a room in a college residence. The College authorities 
reserve the right to make changes in assignments of rooms or 
roommates at any time. New students accepted for admission will 
be instructed by the Deans of Students as to room supplies they 
should bring. 

In order for a student to live in a college residence he must 
take at least ten hours of work for credit, six hours or more of 
which must be done in non-vocational subjects, and he must con- 
form to all regulations governing students. 



15 
EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 

COST OF ATTENDANCE 

Because of the contribution of the people of Alabama to 
the support of higher education, the College is able to offer a 
superior instructional program at costs that are, by comparison, 
extremely reasonable. 

Cost Item Session Semester 

Room, 1 board, laundry, 2 and medical charges $540.00 $270.00 

Sales tax on board 11.44 5.72 

College fee 290.00 145.00 

Total $841.44 $420.72 

All semester charges are payable in advance on the first day 
of each semester as follows: 

September 14 — Room, Board, Laundry, 

and Medical and College fee $420.72 

January 26 — Room, Board, Laundry, 

and Medical and College fee $420.72 

Alabama College's system of providing a summary of charges 
presents more accurately the actual charges made to students. 
This fact should be borne in mind when considering cost com- 
parisons with other institutions where varied and special charges 
are made. The rates above are for students who reside in Alabama 
and who attend for the entire semester. It should be noted that 
no additional laboratory, activity, or other special fees are charged 
except for private music lessons as indicated by catalog sections 
dealing with music programs. 

Arrangements may be made prior to registration for install- 
ment payments. The minimum payment at the beginning of a 
semester must cover all fees and one-fourth of other charges. 
Those interested in installment payments should consult the Trea- 
surer by mail or at registration periods. 

Local Students. Students residing in private homes do not pay 
room, board, laundry and medical charges except under the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

(a) Meals. Individual meals may be purchased at the College 
Cafeteria. The Cafeteria cashier will collect for single meals. 

Three meals per day by the semester $210.00 

Noon meal only by the semester 90.00 

(Subject to State Sales Tax) 

1. An additional charge of $15.00 per semester will be made for residents in 
Napier and New residence hall for men. 

2. Limited to 12 pounds per week. There is a charge of 10c per pound for each 
pound in excess of 12 pounds. 






16 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Arrangements may be made to care for these charges on a 
monthly basis at the Business Office. In the event a student stops 
taking meals at the College during the semester, charges will be 
adjusted to individual meal prices from the beginning of the se- 
mester until the time the student notifies the Business Office 
that he is no longer taking meals in the cafeteria. 

(b) Medical Services. Students who do not reside in an Ala- 
bama College residence hall are not entitled to medical services in 
the College Infirmary. However, if such a student should be in- 
jured or become ill on the college campus he may receive emer- 
gency treatment. An appropriate charge will be made for this 
service. 

Out-oj-State Students. Students from other states are charged 
an additional fee of $210.00 per session, payable in installments 
of $105.00 at the beginning of each semester. A student's resi- 
dence is determined by the residence of his parents or guardian. 
Residence within the state must be maintained by the parents or 
guardian for twelve consecutive months before students will be 
considered as Alabama residents. A student who is 21 years of age 
or over must have maintained residence for twelve consecutive 
months in the State of Alabama prior to first enrollment in Ala- 
bama College before he will be considered as an Alabama resi- 
dent. Residence cannot be established while attending school in 
Alabama. The date for determination of whether the student is 
an in-state or out-of-state student is the date of registration at the 
beginning of the semester for which the student has made ap- 
plication. 

Late Registration. No reduction in room, board, and laundry 
will be made for a student who enters the College within three 
weeks after the beginning of the semester. Students may enter 
after the expiration of two weeks of the semester only by spe- 
cial permission of the Dean, and for a limited amount of work. 
They will be charged all fees for the semester and $2.75 per day 
for room, board, and laundry from entrance to the close of the 
semester. A late registration fee of $5.00 is charged. 

Music Fees. The following fees are inclusive of all charges 
for music tuition, use of practice instruments, and theoretical 
studies. The regular fees are based on two half-hour lessons a 
week with the required practice. 

Courses Leading to Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of 
Music Education Degrees 

Session Semester 

All curricula $100.00 $ 50.00 



The College makes no separate charge for laboratory fees, but students are 
held responsible for damage and breakage in laboratories. 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 17 

A special fee of $5.00 a semester is charged in Wind and 
String Pedagogy to cover the cost of maintenance on musical 
instruments. 

Fees for music are not refunded after a student begins les- 
sons in applied music courses. In case of continued illness of 
the student, the lessons missed are made up. 

Music Courses for Majors in Other Departments 

Session Semester 

Applied music, 2 lessons (private) $100.00 $ 50.00 

Applied music, 1 lesson (private) 56.00 28.00 

Applied music, 1 lesson (private without 

practice) 50.00 25.00 

Applied music (class) 24.00 12.00 

Graduation Fee. A graduation fee of $12.50 is charged all 
candidates for graduation, and is payable in the last semester. 

Regulation Gymnasium Suit. A regulation gymnasium suit 
may be purchased when needed at the College Supply Store at 
an approximate cost of $7.00. 

Withdrawal. A student who resigns during any semester or 
summer term and who does not follow the procedure for with- 
drawing as outlined in another section will receive no refund 
of any kind. 

Refunds. A student who withdraws before the completion of 
a semester is charged $2.75 per day for room, board, laundry and 
medical charges from the opening of the semester until the notice 
of withdrawal is filed with the Deans of Students and approved 
by the Dean of the College. In addition, the student is charged 
$10.00 per month, as a room charge, from the time he with- 
draws until the end of the semester. This sum is deducted from 
the total payment for room, board, laundry, and medical charges 
and the remainder is refunded. 

If a student finds it necessary to withdraw at any time up to 
the end of the first two weeks, ninety per cent of the college fee 
will be refunded, but no refund of the fee will be made after 
that date. 

Adjustment in Charges in Teaching Program. Where it is 
necessary for a student in the teacher training program to live 
away from the campus for a nine weeks period, see the Business 
Manager for adjustment in charges. 

Changes in Charges. The charges listed herein may be 
changed on the order of the Board of Trustees, either by way 
of increase or decrease, to be effective at the beginning of any 
semester or summer session, provided, however* that students in 
residence shall be notified at least thirty days in advance of any 
such changes. 



18 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

FINANCIAL AID 

Through various means Alabama College endeavors to finan- 
cially aid students of academic promise and demonstrated finan- 
cial need. Such financial aids as student employment, scholar- 
ships, assistantships and loans make possible a college educa- 
tion to those who otherwise would be unable to attend. 

Student Employment 

A limited number of opportunities exist on campus for stu- 
dents to earn part of their college expenses through some form 
of student employment, such as work in dining halls, library, 
college offices, and academic and maintenance departments. 

To qualify for continued employment, a student must main- 
tain a scholarship average of not less than C, which is a grade 
point average of 1.00, and meet the requirements of good college 
citizenship. A student accepting part-time employment must meet 
the qualifications of the job and adhere to the assigned duties 
exactly as in the case of full-time employees. 

In addition to employment opportunities on the campus, a 
limited number of such opportunities are open to men, especially, 
in the town and surrounding area. 

Scholarships 

The scholarship policy of Alabama College is based on the 
recognition of the scholarly achievements of its students, and is 
designed to attract superior high school graduates, many of whom 
would not otherwise be able to attend college. 

Scholarships are available to students of all classes. They 
are awarded on the basis of academic achievement and standing 
in the college community. Financial need is considered in award- 
ing all scholarships except the Honors Scholarships. 

The Faculty Committee on Scholarships and Awards studies 
the academic records, the recommendations, and other pertinent 
information of all applicants in an effort to allocate the scholar- 
ships in line with this policy. The Committee may require appli- 
cants for scholarships to come to the campus for interviews, 
achievement tests or other types of examination. 

I. Scholarships administered by the Committee on Scholarships 
and Awards 

Alabama College Honors Scholarships — Freshmen — Only 
those students who have scored unusually high on the American 
College Test will be considered for the Honors Scholarships. The 
College will contact those who have scores that indicate scholas- 
tic honors. 

Alabama College Honors Scholarships — Upperclassmen — Each 
year Alabama College awards Honors Scholarships to four fourth 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 19 

year students, five third year students, and six second year stu- 
dents. These upperclass students are awarded scholarships on the 
basis of their scholastic average while attending the College. 

Alabama War Chest Scholarships — The Alabama War Chest 
Scholarships are to be used in assisting veterans of World War II 
and children of veterans of World War II. Applicants must have 
ranked in the upper fifty per cent of their high school or college 
classes in the preceding scholastic year and must maintain such 
rank. A photostatic copy of parent's discharge papers must ac- 
company application. The photostat will be returned immediate- 

In order for entering freshmen to be eligible, they must have 
been in the upper fourth of their graduating class in high school. 
In the case of students who are already enrolled at Alabama Col- 
lege, they must have a C average on the previous year's work, 
and show leadership ability. In order for the scholarship to be 
renewed, students must maintain a C average. 

Elizabeth Baldwin Hill Memorial Scholarship — In I960 the 
Alabama Congress of Parents and Teachers established a scholar- 
ship at Alabama College in memory of the late Mrs. James Fitts 
Hill, for many years a member of the Board of Trustees of this 
institution. The amount of the scholarship is $250, to be awarded 
to a future teacher of junior or senior standing who is selected 
on a need and ability basis. 

Georgia Emma Douglass Scholarship — Matching gifts for 
scholarship purposes of $750 each were contributed by Miss Lila 
Fundaburk and Mr. Ralph B. Douglass. The interest of this sum 
as it accumulates in amounts of not less than $75 will be avail- 
able to a student entering or enrolled in any class of Alabama 
College. 

Kellogg Foundation Scholarships — The W. K. Kellogg Foun- 
dation, Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1943 granted the specific 
amount of $2,000 to Alabama College to be used for scholar- 
ships for students in medical technology. 

Lucy Harper Hall Scholarship — In 1927 the late Mrs. J. B. 
Hall donated $2,500 to establish the Lucy Harper Hall Scholar- 
ship, the income from the sum to be used at Alabama College 
annually for gift scholarships. 

M. V. Joseph Scholarship — This scholarship was founded in 
1935 through the gift of $2,500 to the College by Mrs. Rosalie 
Joseph Leventritt, of Chicago, Illinois, in memory of her father, 
the late M. V. Joseph, a former member of the Board of Trus- 



20 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

tees. The interest on this sum is available for scholarships to 
students throughout their college course. Recipients must main- 
tain satisfactory scholastic standings and exemplary citizenship 
records. Only graduates of Birmingham high schools are eligible. 
They should apply to the College. Appointments are made on 
the recommendation of the Superintendent of Birmingham 
Schools. 

Rizpah Dudley Memorial Scholarship — Miss Rizpah Dudley, 
past supervisor of the laboratory school, left in her will a bequest 
to the College of $2,000 to be used in perpetuity as a scholarship 
fund, the proceeds from the investment to be used as a gift schol- 
arship to worthy students. 

Shelby County Kiwanis Club Scholarships — The Kiwanis Club 
of Shelby County in conjunction with Alabama College awaids 
scholarships annually to outstanding students from Shelby Coun- 
ty High Schools. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of 
leadership ability, civic responsibility, and on outstanding high 
school record. One full scholarship and an undertermined num- 
ber of tuition scholarships will be awarded each year. Recom- 
mendations are made to the Alabama College Scholarship and 
Awards Committee by the high school principals. 

II. Scholarships administered by individual departments at Ala- 
bama College. Applicants should write the departmental 
chairman for information. 

Alabama College Music Scholarship — Since 1946 the College 
has offered gift scholarships to freshmen in the Department of 
Music. The purpose of these scholarships is to recognize students 
who have demonstrated talent in vocal or instrumental music and 
to encourage them in the development of this talent. 

Four scholarships of $100 shall be offered to freshmen each 
year, and the scholarships will be renewable throughout the stu- 
dents' enrollment at Alabama College if superior scholarship 
and commendable citizenship are maintained. 

Edythe Saylor Scholarships — The late Miss Edythe Saylor, 
member of the staff of the department of Health, Physical Edu- 
cation, and Recreation from 1928-1951, bequeathed to the Col- 
lege the proceeds from the sale of her personal possessions. This 
sum has been invested and provides the income used for scholar- 
ships and awards for women majoring in physical education. 
There are two scholarships of $250 each available to entering 
freshman women who have scored high on the American College 
Test and who have a keen interest in becoming a physical edu- 
cation teacher. Application forms may be secured from high 
school principals or physical education teachers. Participants must 
be in the upper fourth of their graduating class. In addition to 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 21 

these scholarships there is one $200 scholarship available to a 
physical education major of Junior standing and a $50 award to 
a Senior. Both of these awards are made upon the basis of schol- 
arship, leadership, aptitude, personality, and citizenship. Recipients 
of these two awards are recommended by the department of 
physical education to the scholarship committee of the College. 

Frances Cater Memorial Scholarship — $100.00 — To be award- 
ed to a talented, worthy young woman. Love of music, native 
ability and desire to learn are basic requirements. Renewable 
when need and worthiness are evident. Donors are Mrs. G. A. 
Carleton and Mrs. B. W. Young, sisters of Frances Cater. 

Hallie Farmer Memorial Scholarship — An annual award of 
$500.00 is made in memory of Dr. Hallie S. Farmer, former chair- 
man of The Department of the Social Sciences at Alabama Col- 
lege. The award is made to a student of junior standing for use 
in the senior year. Recommendations are made to the Scholarship 
and Awards Committee by the chairman of The Department of 
the Social Sciences. 

The Jensen Award — in honor of Ruth Jensen Trumbauer 
(Barnard College 1917) — is given annually to that undergraduate 
who shows the greatest skill in conversing in a foreign language. 
Foreign students are ineligible. The award will be made upon the 
recommendation of the Foreign Languages Department. 

Loveman, Joseph and Loeb Scholarship — Home Economics 
Scholarship — Loveman, Joseph and Loeb, of Birmingham, has pro- 
vided a cash scholarship of $325 for a student above the fresh- 
man year who has completed satisfactory requirements in the 
clothing, textile and art subjects in the Department of Home 
Economics. 

A scholarship of this value will be offered each year to a 
student who meets the necessary requirements during the pre- 
ceding school session. 

Presser Foundation Scholarships — Music Scholarships — The 
Presser Foundation awards each year to Alabama College a grant 
of $350 to be used for scholarships in the Department of Music. 
The awards are made on the basis of merit, preference being 
given those students who expect to become teachers of music. 

III. Scholarships Administered by outside agencies, organizations 
or individuals. 

American Legion Auxiliary Scholarships — The Alabama De- 
partment of the American Legion Auxiliary established at Ala- 
bama College in 1940 one scholarship of $100 per year for 
daughters of World War veterans. In 1950 a second scholarship 
of $100, known as the Molly Austin Memorial, Scholarship, was 
added. These scholarships are restricted to young women who 
are residents of the State. 



22 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

An applicant must submit proof of her father's honorable 
discharge from the armed services, a transcript of her scholastic 
record in high school or college, a health certificate, and testi- 
monials concerning character, worthiness, and need of assistance. 

Application should be made to the State Headquarters of the 
American Legion Auxiliary, 762 South Court Street, Montgomery, 
Alabama. Applications are accepted each year through June 1, 
and students must re-apply annually to be considered for this 
scholarship. 

Birmingham Music Club Scholarship — The Birmingham Mu- 
sic Club established in 1947 a music scholarship at Alabama 
College. At present this organization is offering a $250 scholar- 
ship each year to a student majoring in music at Alabama 
College. 

It is available to a young man or a young woman resident 
of the Birmingham area who is a serious student of music, well 
prepared, and desirous of a musical career. 

For detailed information write to the President of the Bir- 
mingham Music Club, 1914 Fourth Avenue, North, Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Daughters of the American Revolution Scholarship — The Ala- 
bama Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, has estab- 
lished at Alabama College three gift scholarships: the May Adams 
Comer Scholarship of $50, the Minnie S. Mitchell Scholarship of 
$100, and the Elizabeth Clayton Raney Scholarship of $50. These 
awards are made annually to worthy young women who give 
promise of leadership. Preference is given graduates of Kate Dun- 
can Smith DAR School. 

For additional information write Scholarship Chairman, Ala- 
bama College. 

Gorgas Foundation Scholarships — Each year the Gorgas 
Scholarship Foundation, Inc., in cooperation with the Alabama 
Academy of Science and certain educational institutions in the 
State, offers substantial scholarships to winners in the Alabama 
State Science Talent Search. Alabama College is one of the parti- 
cipating schools. Any student who is interested in entering the 
contest should talk to his high school science teacher. 

Linly Heflin Scholarships — The Linly Heflin Unit, of Bir- 
mingham, Alabama, a civic and philanthropic organization spon- 
soring education for young women, offers annually several gift 
scholarships at Alabama College. One of these scholarships hon- 
ors Dr. Minnie L. Steckel, Student Counselor at Alabama Col- 
lege from 1930 until her death in December, 1952. These scholar- 
ships are available to students residing in Alabama, with superior 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 23 

scholastic and exemplary citizenship records. Preference is given 
to students in the Birmingham area. 

For additional information write the Scholarship Chairman, 
Alabama College. 

Philip G. Hartung Memorial Scholarship — In memory of Mr. 
Philip G. Hartung, a scholarship is given annually by his wife to 
an outstanding graduate from Cullman High School. The recipient 
is chosen by the Scholarship Committee of Cullman High School 
on the basis of need, scholarship, community service, and charac- 
ter. 

United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship — The Ala- 
bama Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy has 
established at Alabama College five scholarships known as the 
Virginia Clopton scholarship, the Sallie Jones scholarship, the 
Minnie S. Mitchell scholarship, the Lizzie Crenshaw scholarship, 
and the Mollie Files Crenshaw scholarship. The scholarships are 
$100 in value. 

If a scholarship is held either three or four years, the last 
year of tenure shall be a loan, to be repaid to the United Daugh- 
ters of the Confederacy of Alabama. The loan will bear no in- 
terest the first year, but will bear interest at the rate of five per 
cent each year thereafter that it remains unpaid. 

Applicants must be residents of Alabama and descendants of 
Confederate soldiers. Endorsement by the Alabama Division of 
the United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship Committee 
is required. Detailed information will be supplied upon request 
by the Scholarship Chairman, Alabama College. 

Loans 

I. National Defense Student Loan 

Alabama College participates in the National Defense Stu- 
dent Loan Program, which provides loans under the National De- 
fense Education Act of 1958. These loans are based on an easy 
repayment plan beginning one year after a borrower ceases to 
pursue a full-time course of study at an institution of higher edu- 
cation, with special provisions for students who later enter public 
secondary and elementary teaching and public school administra- 
tive careers. For detailed information and an application blank, 
write Dean of Men, Alabama College. 

II. Loans administered by the Committee on Scholarship and 
Awards 

Alta Patterson Memorial Loan Fund — In memory of Miss 
Alta Patterson, Home Economics Faculty Member, a loan fund 
was established. The loan is available to the amount of $250 a 
year to sophomore, junior and senior students. 



24 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Alumni Association Graduate Loan Fund — The Alumni As- 
sociation maintains a loan fund to be used by graduates of the 
College who may desire financial assistance while pursuing their 
graduate studies. Not more than $300 may be borrowed by a 
student at any given time. The awards are made by the Alumni 
Association Executive Board. 

College Night Loan Fund — This loan was established by the 
Student Government Association from the proceeds of College 
Night. The loan is available to any student, irrespective of class, 
who has shown exemplary citizenship and satisfactory scholastic 
achievement. 

Frances Marie Vardaman Memorial Loan Fund — A revolving 
loan fund of $250 limited to $125 per person. This loan is 
available to senior students only. Loans are without interest and 
must be repaid one year after graduation. The loan was establish- 
ed by Miss Mildred A. Vardaman in memory of her sister, Fran- 
ces Marie Vardaman. 

Janie Brassell and Janilu Brassell — Jordan Memorial Loan 
Fund — This Loan Fund has been established by William R. and 
Jirdie Brassell Jordan in memory of Janie Ward Brassell, an 
alumna of Alabama College and mother of Jirdie Brassell Jordan; 
and Janilu Brassell — Jordan, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam R. and Jirdie Brassell Jordan. The Fund in the amount of 
$500.00 will be administered according to the general policies and 
procedures of the Scholarship Committee of Alabama College. 

Kellogg Foundation Loan Company: The W. K. Kellogg 
Foundation, Battle Creek, Michigan, in 1943 granted Alabama 
College $2,000 to be used as loans for students majoring in Medi- 
cal Technology. Students must have completed the first two years 
of college work with a satisfactory scholastic record and must 
have exemplary citizenship records to be eligible for a loan from 
this fund. 

Louesa J. Keys Loan Fund — A revolving fund of $100 for 
loans to senior students planning to enter the teaching profes- 
sion was established by Louesa J. Keys. The loan must be repaid 
during the first year after graduation. 

Mary Alice Mizell Loan Fund — This loan fund of $150, open 
to senior students, was established by Mary Alice Boyd of the 
Education Department of Alabama College. 

Mary E. McWilliams Loan Fund — Miss Mary E. McWilliams, 
alumna and faculty member of the College, gave the Alabama 
College Alumni Association $1000, the interest of which would 
be loaned each year to a deserving freshman with an outstanding 
high school record. 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 25 

Montgomery Business and Professional Women's Club Loan — 
A $400 revolving loan fund at Alabama College, preference to 
be given to students from Montgomery County who are of the 
junior or senior level. The maximum for any holder is $100 
per year. 

Montgomery Pilot Club Fund — The Pilot Club of Mont- 
gomery has established two loan funds of $300 each to be award- 
ed by the College Committee on Scholarships and Awards. The 
fund is available to sophomore, junior, and senior students, 
though preference must be given women students from Mont- 
gomery County. 

Myrtle Brooke Loan Fund — A loan fund of $250 for majors 
in the field of social work. It is an expression of appreciation 
for the contribution to the development of scientific social work 
by the late Miss Myrtle Brooke. 

Opportunity Loan Fund — Mrs. Maud Prueitt Fennell grant- 
ed the sum of $1,000 for the establishment of the Opportunity 
Loan Fund for the asisistance of juniors and seniors. The maxi- 
mum for any holder is $200 per year. 

III. Loans administered by the individual departments at Alabama 

College. 

Charles Rendell Calkins Loan Fund — Music — A loan fund of 
$150 established in the memory of Charles Rendell Calkins. It is 
available to seniors in the Department of Music. 

Music Council Loan Fund — A loan fund of $150 established 
for students majoring in music. 

IV. Loans administered by outside organizations, clubs and in- 
dividual organizations. 

Alabama Federation of Women's Clubs Loan Fund — The 
Alabama Federation of Women's Club, at its third annual meet- 
ing in 1897 at Anniston, Alabama, began its active work for the 
College by contributing to a loan fund. 

In 1898 the Federation established the Kate Morizette Loan 
Fund, and in 1909 the Conra McConaughy Loan Fund. In 1911 
the Federation received a gift of $100 from Miss Fancilla Roman 
Haley, of Jasper, to establish the Elizabeth Haley Moore Loan 
Fund. In 1916 she increased this fund to $225. Other loan funds 
have been established as memorials to Kate Hagan, Marie Pearce, 
and Minnie Holman Phillips. 

In 1950 an additional fund of $500 was established to be 
known as the Minnie L. Steckel Student Loan Fund. 

All of these loans are not available annually, but each year 
the Federation makes loans totaling several hundred dollars. Loan 



26 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

value to one recipient is limited to $200. Recipients must be Ala- 
bama residents of high character and creditable scholarship. 
They must be qualified for the junior or senior class. 

Alabama club women maintain several other loan funds 
which are subject to similar regulations. They are given by club 
districts, counties, or individual clubs. 

Alabama Library Association Graduate Scholarship Loan — 
The Alabama Library Association has established three loan 
funds for the assistance of graduate students who are interested 
in pursuing a full course of study leading to a degree in Library 
Science. Alabama College graduates are eligible for this assistance. 
The funds are: 

1. The Alabama Library Association Scholarship Loan, in 
the amount of one thousand dollars ($1,000), is avail- 
able to a student who plans to enroll in a fully accredited 
library school in any college or university in the United 
States. 

2. The Thomas M. Owen Scholarship Loan is for three hun- 
dred ($300) dollars, and is made to a student who 
plans to pursue a full course of study leading to a de- 
gree at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. 

3. The Marie B. Owen Scholarship is for one hundred and 
fifty dollars ($150), and is granted to a student who in- 
tends to enter Emory University at Atlanta, Georgia. 

(It is possible for one individual to apply for both the 
Thomas M. Owen and the Marie B. Owen Scholarships for 
study at Emory University.) 

For information, write to Miss Richardena Ramsay, Parke 
Memorial Library, 1814 South 11th Avenue, Birmingham 5, Ala- 
bama. 

Lettie Daffin Perdue Loan Fund — The Woman's Auxiliary 
to the Medical Association of the State of Alabama established 
in 1935 a loan fund for the assistance of Alabama College stu- 
dents. The loan is not to exceed $200.00 for any single scholas- 
tic year. It is open to women students in any class; however, 
preference is given daughters of physicians. 

Linly Heflin Unit Loan Fund — The Linly Heflin Unit, of 
Birmingham, Alabama, a civic and philanthropic organization 
sponsoring education for young women, has certain funds which 
it makes available for educational loans to students at Alabama 
College. The loans are available to students in the State who 
have superior and exemplary citizenship records. 

For additional information write, Chairman, Scholarship 
Committee, Alabama College. 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 27 

V. Private Loans 

Today there are many private agencies making loans avail- 
able to families planning to send their children to college. Such 
a move should be considered since the financial assistance pro- 
gram at Alabama College is limited and the demand for finan- 
cial aid is great. It might be worth while to write several of the 
following agencies to learn of their programs: 

Pickett & Hatcher Educational Fund 
P. O. Box 1238 
Columbus, Georgia 

United Student Aid Funds, Inc. 

Box 72 

Burlingame, California 

Funds for Education, Inc. 
319 Lincoln Street 
Manchester, New Hampshire 

Assistantships 

Specific appointments are available in the library and in 
several departments of the College. These appointments are desig- 
nated as assistantships. The appointments will be made on the 
basis of the recommendations of departmental chairmen. These 
positions are only available to upperclass students. 

Procedure for Application 

All applications submitted for financial assistance must be 
filled out completely and accurately if they are to be considered. 
The processing of these applications will begin about May 1, and 
those students receiving financial assistance will be contacted by 
late July. Due to the tremendous number of applications, those 
applicants who are not awarded assistance will not be contacted. 

An applicant for financial assistance must have been tenta- 
tively admitted to Alabama College before any serious considera- 
tion is given the application. 

To make application for any of the financial aid programs 
administered by the College, write Chairman, Scholarship Com- 
mittee, Alabama College, P.O. Box 38, Montevallo, Alabama. To 
make application for any of the individual scholarships or loans 
administered by the departments of Alabama College, contact the 
appropriate departmental chairman. For consideration for a schol- 
arship or loan administered by an individual or private organiza- 
tion, write to the respective individual or organization. 



28 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

In 1916 the president and faculty of Alabama College en- 
tered into a contract with the students in which they delegated 
to them, insofar as it is possible to do so, the authority to gov- 
ern themselves. Thus began the tradition of Student Govern- 
ment at Alabama College, a tradition of which the College is 
justifiably proud. Under a constitution written by students and 
adopted by the student body, Student Government operates 
through three branches — the executive, vested in the Executive 
Council; the legislative, vested in the Senate; and the judicial, 
vested in the Court. Every student is a member of the Associa- 
tion, and every student has a vote in electing the members of the 
three governing bodies. 

Each year the Student Government Association publishes and 
distributes to students a Student Handbook, which contains the 
Association's Constitution and By-laws and the regulations govern- 
ing student life. Every student is responsible for the information 
contained in the Handbook. It should be read prior to admission. 
Its contents should be completely familiar to every registered 
student. 

Alabama College reserves the right, at any time, to exclude 
students whose conduct is prejudicial to the best interests of the 
college, or whose academic standing is unacceptable. This may 
be done at any time and without the necessity of assigning any 
further reason thereof; in such cases no fees will be refunded 
or remitted, and neither the college nor its officers shall be held 
liable for such action. 

HONOR CODE 

Upon registration at Alabama College a student not only 
automatically becomes an integral part of Student Government 
but also assumes the responsibility of accepting and upholding 
the Honor Code. This code reads: 

A student at Alabama College upholds the honor of the 
College by refraining from every form of dishonesty in 
his college life, and by doing all that is in his power to 
create a spirit of honesty and honor on the campus. 

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL LIFE 

A varied social life on the campus is available to Alabama 
College students. Formal and informal dances and social events 
of many types are held in the college gymnasium, the recreation 
area in Napier Hall, the Tea House, and Main Hall. Teas, recep- 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 29 

tions, luncheons, dinners and other social events are held at the 
above places and at other appropriate places on the campus. 
"Date" parlors are located in each women's residence hall. 

Organized recreational activities are provided for by the De- 
partment of Health, Physical Education and Recreation and the 
Alabama College Recreation Association. This program consists 
of activities ranging from informal recreation activities to or- 
ganized intramural, extramural, and intercollegiate activities for 
men. The activities are conducted at Bibb Graves Hall, McCall 
Swimming Pool, on the sports fields and courts on campus, at 
the lake, the camping area, and at the College's nine-hole golf 
course. 

Orchesis Club is an organization open to students interested 
in creative dance, composition and performance in modern dance. 

Catalina Club is an organization open to students interested 
in advanced synchronized swimming and other aspects of swim- 
ming performance. The club sponsors an annual water show. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Alabamian, the College newspaper, was first published 
in 1923 and is issued bi-monthly during the regular session. 
Copies are delivered to all students and to the staff, the cost being 
covered by the general fees. The subscription rate for others is 
$2.00 per year. 

Montage. This is the yearbook of the College and was first 
published in 1907. Each student receives a copy, the cost of 
which is covered by the general fees. 

The Tower, the college literary magazine, was first published 
in 1932 to stimulate creative writing among the students and to 
"build up in Alabama College a tradition of literary aliveness." 
The subscription rate is fifty cents per copy. 

THE COLLEGE THEATRE 

The College Theatre invites all students to work as actors 
and as technicians on the production of representative world 
dramas. Four plays are produced each year in Palmer Auditorium 
as part of the major program. During the course of four 
years the playbill presents as varied a theatre experience as pos- 
sible by including plays of different periods, countries, styles, 
and types. This program offers the students an opportunity for 
the synthesis of their studies in the various departments of the 
College. As an extension of these departments and as an agency 
for education in the theatre arts, the College > Theatre program 
trains the student culturally and socially. This is the basic reason 
for the existence of the College Theatre. 



30 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The Experimental Theatre is a vital part of the Alabama 
College Theatre program and offers the college community op- 
portunities to participate creatively in theatre activities not 
generally available. The Experimental Theatre, sponsored by the 
Speech Department, presents a series of programs in Reynolds 
Studio Theatre which, although faculty supervised, are student 
directed, acted, produced, and often student written. These pro- 
ductions provide the college with a wide variety of theatre fare 
ranging from original plays, concert readings, creative dramatics 
and adaptations, to well known historical and contemporary 
dramas. Participation in this theatre program is open to all stu- 
dents of Alabama College. 

ALABAMA COLLEGE DEBATERS 

The Alabama College debate squad is open to all students 
interested in public speaking. Previous experience is not a prere- 
quisite for membership. This group represents the college in 
tournaments throughout the South in debate, persuasive and ex- 
temporaneous speaking, and oral-interpretation. In November our 
chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, the national forensics honorary, hosts 
the Central Alabama Novice Tournament for debaters in a six- 
state area. In addition to their tournament schedule, the squad 
appears in public debates on campus and on Alabama Educational 
Television. 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Radio Station WRSD, "The Voice of Alabama College," 
(660 kilocycles) is Alabama College's own campus radio station. 
Located in Reynolds Hall, WRSD has facilities for radio train- 
ing and experience. Studios, control and monitoring equipment, 
tape recorders, transmitter, record and transcription library, micro- 
phones, and remote control equipment provide excellent facilities 
for radio training. 

The station is a full member of the Inter-Collegiate Broad- 
casting system, and has been assigned call letters by the Federal 
Communications Commission. WRSD is staffed and operated ex- 
clusively by students. Students perform the duties of station mana- 
ger, assistant station manager, program director, chief engineer, 
announcers, newscasters, continuity writers, engineers, and other 
performers. 

WRSD not only provides actual working conditions and 
experience, but also provides the entire campus with a well-round- 
ed schedule of radio listening. Faculty and student interviews, 
"on-the-spot" broadcasts, several hours of classical and popular 
music, round table and discussion type programs, and transcribed 
educational shows make WRSD a popular station on the campus. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 31 

Alabama College is a participating member of the Alabama 
Educational TV Network and opportunities are available for 
actual telecasting through the Birmingham studios of this network. 

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 

The Department of Music makes a special effort to attract 
students into the various musical organizations which it sponsors. 
The Chorale (women's voices), the Men's Chorus, and the Wind 
Ensemble are open to all without audition. The College Choir 
(mixed voices) is a more select group and all applicants are 
auditioned. The membership of the Chamber Choir is selected by 
the faculty. The Chamber Orchestra, Opera, and Chamber Music 
groups are open by audition only. All musical organizations 
make several public appearances throughout the year. The College 
Choir makes an annual tour. 

In addition to the various musical organizations to which 
students are invited to belong, the Music Department presents 
many concerts and recitals throughout the year. All students are 
invited to attend — there is no admission charge. 

COLLEGE NIGHT 

The highlight of the student year is College Night. This is 
the greatest all-student tradition at Alabama College. 

College Night is the culmination of four weeks' creative ac- 
tivity by the Purples and Golds, the two sides into which the stu- 
dent body is divided. Student leaders and assistant leaders meet- 
ing the required qualifications are elected by popular vote of 
the student body. Alternately, they choose sides, select their 
writers, costumers, staging crews, composers, and employ all 
the talents of their particular group. 

Each side writes, composes, directs and stages dramatizations 
and songs. An atmosphere of intense rivalry and closest secrecy 
prevails over the campus from the time sides are chosen until 
the decision of the judges is heard. 

This event, which began as a modest observance of Washing- 
ton's Birthday by the four classes, has grown until it now attracts 
to the campus over three thousand visitors annually. It generally 
falls on the Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights in February 
nearest Washington's Birthday. 

CONCERTS, LECTURES AND PLAYS 

Each year distinguished speakers, lecturers, and artists ap- 
pear before the students and faculty in Palmer Auditorium. Many 
of these programs are presentations of the Concert and Lecture 
Series; others are arranged for special occasions of the College 
and of Montevallo civic organizations. These attractions are in 



32 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

addition to the plays, concerts, and lectures by theatre groups, 
music and dance groups, and individuals within the College. 

DANCY LECTURES 

The Dancy Lectures were made possible through a bequest 
of $12,500 by Miss Unity Dandridge Dancy, of Morgan County, 
Alabama, honoring her mother. In her will Miss Dancy stated 
that her gift was to "endow the Departments of English, Lit- 
erature and Expression" at Alabama College. 

This statement of purpose by Miss Dancy has been interpret- 
ed to mean that the Dancy Fund shall be used mainly to extend 
or supplement the services of the English and Speech Depart- 
ments of the College. The income from the endowment is used 
to support a series of lectures. Every second year a scholar-critic 
of recognized authority is invited to present, in a series of lec- 
tures delivered at the College, the results of original research 
and fresh criticism. 

The first series of Dancy Lectures was given at Alabama Col- 
lege in April, 1939, by Dr. Douglas Southall Freeman, dis- 
tinguished editor, biographer and research scholar. Dr. Freeman, 
whose four volume life of R. E. Lee was awarded the Pulitzer 
Prize in 1934, spoke on "The South to Posterity: a Review of 
Southern Historical Literature," (Scribner's, New York). 

Since that time such distinguished scholars, orators and 
critics as Lewis Mumford, Francis Pendleton Gaines, Mitford 
Mathews, Dumas Malone, Louis Wright, John W. Gassner, Char- 
lotte Lee, and Russell Kirk have visted the College and given 
a series of lectures in keeping with the original purpose of Miss 
Dancy's bequest. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Although the College is non-sectarian, its students find on 
the campus and in the Town of Montevallo excellent religious 
influences. In addition to the Student Christian Association, there 
are a number of organized church groups in Montevallo where 
students may find congenial Christian fellowship and opportuni- 
ties for training in religious leadership. Six churches — Baptist, 
Catholic, The Church of Christ, Episcopal, Methodist, and Pres- 
byterian — welcome students to join in their religious life. Stu- 
dents of the College are encouraged to attend the church of 
their choice. 

STUDENT CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

Students at Alabama College are offered many opportunities 
to participate in group activities. Below are listed national and 
local honor societies and special interest groups which are active 
on the campus. 




Intercollegiate athletics include baseball, tennis, 
golf and cross-country. 




Camping Provides Week-end fun 



Home Economics Class 





Graduation 



Modern Swimming Pool — Recreation and Wafer Sports 





Cross-country included in sports program. 



STUDENT LIFE AND ACTIVITIES 33 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Alpha Lambda Delta (Fresh. Scholarship) Omicron Nu (Home Economics) 

Beta Beta Beta (Biology) Pi Delta Epsilon (Journalism) 

Delta Phi Alpha (German) Pi Delta Phi (French) 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education) Pi Kappa Delta (Forensic) 

Kappa Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) Pi Kappa Lambda (Music) 

Kappa Pi (Art) Sigma Alpha Sigma (Secretarial Admin.) 

National Collegiate Players (Dramatics) Zeta Phi Eta (Speech) 

LOCAL HONOR SOCIETIES 

Delta Theta Pi Men's Leadership 

Eta Sigma Phi Scholarship 

Lambda Sigma Pi Senior Women 

Mu Delta Alpha Spanish 

Phi Alpha Mu Music 

INTEREST CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

A Club Intercollegiate Athletics 

Alabama College Debaters Intercollegiate Debating 

Association for Childhood Education Education 

Biology Club Biology 

Business Administration Club Business Administration 

Catalina Club Synchronized Swimming 

Circle K Men's Service 

Orchesis Modern Dance 

Dietetic Club Dietetics 

Future Teachers of America Teachers 

International Relations Club World Affairs 

Ivol Spafford Club Home Economics 

Logos Speech Correction 

Physical Education Club Physical Education 

Psychology Club Psychology 

Radio Council Radio 

Recreation Association Physical Education 

Retail Club Retail Work 

Sociology Club Social Work, Sociology 

Theatre Council Theatre 

There are also opportunities for participation in the follow- 
ing social organizations for those students who meet the mem- 
bership requirements for the group concerned: Students of Alum- 
ni Club, Student Government Association, and the Student Chris- 
tian Association. 

HOLIDAYS 

The College observes each year Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
and Spring holidays. The dates for these holidays for 1964-1965 
may be found in the College Calendar. 

All residences and the cafeteria are closed during these 
holidays. All students must make arrangements to leave the cam- 
pus on the day the holiday period begins. 



34 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

SPECIAL SERVICES 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

Peterson Hall, the campus infirmary with thirty-six beds, is 
maintained exclusively for the care of students residing in resi- 
dence halls in all medical cases. It is deemed best to send surgical 
cases off the campus. A full time medical doctor and three nurses 
have charge of this service. 

The College furnishes each student applying for admission a 
medical form which must be filled out and signed by a local 
physician. This form must be submitted to the College as a part 
of registration procedures. 

During the first weeks of each session the members of the 
medical staff appraise student health examinations and in con- 
junction with the members of the Department of Health, Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation determine appropriate physical 
education activities which the student may elect. 

Members of the faculty are instructed to report to the physi- 
cian students who need advice concerning health. 

FOOD SERVICES 

Food service at Alabama College is provided in a modern 
cafeteria. This service is rendered for students and faculty mem- 
bers who elect to take their meals with the students. The Food 
Service Director and Assistant Food Service Director are directly 
responsible for food services and are trained dietitians. 

TESTING AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 

An active program of vocational testing and counseling 
serves the students of Alabama College. This program is super- 
vised by a Vocational Guidance Committee of the Faculty and 
Administration. 

PLACEMENT BUREAUS 

Alabama College provides two placement services for students 
and former students of the College who wish to be placed in 
either teaching or non-teaching positions. The Teacher Placement 
Bureau, which is located in the Department of Education, serves 
those students seeking teaching positions. The Personnel and 
Placement Bureau, located in Reynolds Hall, serves those stu- 
dents who desire non-teaching positions. These services are not 
confined to recent graduates but are open and free to all former 
students. 

SPEECH CLINIC 

The Department of Speech maintains a clinic for students 
who have such speech disorders as stuttering, lisping, cleft palate 



SPECIAL SERVICES 35 

problems, voice problems, foreign accent, articulatory inaccura- 
cies, etc. Voice recordings are made and individual corrective 
programs are set up. Instructors in all departments are urged to 
advise students with defective speech to avail themselves of the 
services of the clinic. 

The clinic is also available on a residential or out-patient 
plan to any person in the state with defective speech. Inquiries 
may be made for diagnosis by writing the Chairman of the De- 
partment of Speech. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

Almni Newsletter. This is issued at intervals to members of 
the Alumni Association. 

Bulletin. The College issues The Bulletin quarterly. This 
publication contains matters of general and specific interest to 
the citizens of the State, prospective students, and the College 
as a whole. 

News Letter. The News Letter carries announcements of spe- 
cific services of the College, and information of general educa- 
tional interest. 

Weekly Bulletin. This weekly publication serves as a calen- 
dar of campus activities and is circulated only among students 
and faculty. 

Student Handbook. This is published each year by the Stu- 
dent Government Association, and contains the traditions and 
regulations of the College, and is given to all students. 

Student-Faculty Directory. The Directory is published at the 
beginning of each school year and lists students, faculty, and 
staff. Students' names are followed by their class, their home 
address, and their Montevallo address. Office, home address, and 
telephone numbers of the faculty and staff are shown. 

ALUMNI 

The Alumni Association of Alabama College, organized in 
1902, promotes the welfare of the College and the alumni by 
increasing the interest of members in the College and each other. 

Active membership is open to any former student of the 
College with a minimum of one semester's residence credit, on 
receipt of an annual contribution ($5.00 minimum) to the Alum- 
ni Fund. The Alumni Association undertakes a number of worth- 
while projects in the interest of the college. 



36 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The affairs of the Association are managed through the Ex- 
ecutive Board. The Board is composed of four officers, the 
standing committee chairmen, the Faculty-Alumni Committee 
chairman, and the representative from the Alabama College 
Alumni Association council. 

The Association Officers are: Mrs. J. W. Roper (Catherine 
Manning), 110 West Longwood, Huntsville, President; Mrs. W. 
H. Turner (Annie Mae Paulk), Box 87, Union Springs, Vice- 
President; Miss Ethel Harris, Montevallo, Treasurer. 



37 

DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ART 

Associate Professors Allen, Barnes, Turpin; 
Assistant Professor Spicer. 

For a major in art, see curriculum outline on page 83. 

For a minor in art, twenty-one hours are required which must include Art 101, 
102, 321 and 322. Additional courses are selected from courses which meet the needs 
of the student. 

101. Foundations of Art. Staff 

An introduction to the principles of the visual arts. Designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the creative process through problems in line, color, 
form, value and texture. Required of all art majors and minors. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

102. Foundations of Art. Staff 

A continuation of Art 101. Study of structural form, the fundamental 
principles of design and visual organization as a basis for all creative work 
in the visual arts. Emphasis on experimentation in the creative use of 
materials. Required of all art majors and minors. Prerequisite: Art 101. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

201. Drawing. Staff 

An exploration of the principles, techniques and materials of drawing. 
Introduction to drawing media, elementary perspective, and drafting. Em- 
phasis on the creative use of line in pictorial composition. Six studio hours 
per week. Required of all art majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

202. Drawing. Staff 

A study of the figure in pictorial composition. Drawing from the model 
in charcoal, pencil, ink and paint. Emphasis on the finished drawing, in- 
dividual styles and techniques. Study of the sketch as preparation for work 
in other media. Six studio hours per week. Required of all art majors. 
Prerequisite: Art 201. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
220. Lettering, Layout and Advertising Design. Barnes 

Fundamentals of lettering, typography, and commercial layout and de- 
sign. Newspaper, magazine, and advertising layout. Emphasis on studio 
methods. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
280. Introduction to Ceramics Allen 

Designing, building, glazing and firing pieces from clay. Various tech- 
niques and methods of ceramic materials. Six studio hours per week. Prere- 
quisite: Art 101 or instructor's permission. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
300. Introduction to Painting. Barnes, Spicer 

An introduction to painting media, watercolor, gouache, tempera, and 
oils. Emphasis on painting techniques, the development of form and design, 
and the handling of paint. Prerequisite: Art 202. Six studio hours per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
310. Introduction to Sculpture. Allen 

An introduction to sculpture media. Problems of three-dimensional de- 
sign in sculpture; modeling and carving. Six studio hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: Art 202. 

Credit,. 3 hours. 



38 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



320. Introduction to Printmaking. 



341. 

351. 
360. 



Turpin 

Introduction to graphic media. Emphasis on the principles and tech- 
niques of relief, intaglio and planographic methods of printing. Six studio 
hours per week. Prerequsite: Art 101, 102 and 201. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



321. History of Art. 



Turpin 



A survey of the history of art from pre-historic time to the Renaissance. 
Emphasis on the relationship of art to the civilization of the time. Re- 
quired of all art majors and minors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



322. History of Art. 



Turpin 

A survey of the history of art from the Renaissance to the present time. 
The arts studied in relation to their cultural and historical conditions, and 
examined for their impact on contemporary civilization. Required of all art 
majors and minors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



Art Education in the Elementary School. 

The materials and methods of elementary art education. 

Credit, 



Allen 

2 hours. 
Allen 



Art Education in the Secondary School. 

The materials and methods of secondary art education. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
Theory of Art. 

A study in the philosophical basis for creativity, foundations of aesthe- 
tics, criticism and form analysis in the visual arts with analogies from the 
other fine arts. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

Art Education in Elementary and Allen 

Secondary Schools. Credit, 4 hours. 



361. 

370. Advanced Design. 



Staff 



Problems in advanced design in the student's chosen field of concentra- 
tion. Interior design, costume design, commercial design, and display. Em- 
phasis on studio methods and development of finished product. Six studio 
hours per week. Prerequisite: Art 101, 102. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
380. Ceramics. Allen 

Advanced methods and techniques in ceramic materials, the use of 
the potters wheel, engobs and color slips. Also casting, firing, glazing, and 
glaze chemistry. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: Art 280. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400. Painting. Barnes, Spicer 

Painting in oil, encaustic, polymer tempera, and plastic media. Emphasis 
on development of individual styles, attitudes, and techniques and the handling 
of paint. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: Art 300. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
410. Sculpture. Spicer 

Problems of the techniques and materials of sculpture with emphasis 

on the solution to problems of design, fabrication, and placement. Work in 

wood, clay, stone, plaster, and metal. Six studio hours per week. Prere- 
quisite: Art 310. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
420. Printmaking. Turpin 

Advanced study in techniques and design in >, relief, intaglio and piano- 
graphic methods of producing prints. Emphasis on individual approaches to 
graphic materials. Six studio hours per week. Prerequisite: Art 320. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 39 

421. Art of the United States. 

A survey of the history of art from the American Revolution to the 
present time with an emphasis on architecture, sculpture, and painting. The 
arts are studied in relation to their cultural and historical conditions and 
examined for their influence upon contemporary society. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
440. Independent Study and Research. Staff 

Individual study under the supervision of the art faculty. Advanced 
projects in the area of concentration. Four to twelve studio hours per week. 
Prerequisite: One of the following: 202, 370, 380, 400, 410, 420. 

Credit, 2 to 6 hours. 
450. Project Seminar. Staff 

Coordination of advanced, specialized study and final projects. Monthly 
criticism by the art faculty. Required of all senior art majors. 

No credit. 

BIOLOGY 

Professors Turner, Connell; Associate Professor Cotter; 

Assistant Professors Mount, Sledge; 

Instructor Groover. 

For a major in biology and medical technology, see outlines of curricula on 
pages 84 and 85. 

Students minoring in biology must take Biology 101-102 and twelve additional 
hours selected with the approval of the Chairman of the Department. 

Students who elect to take biology to satisfy part of the general education re- 
quirements will take Biology 101-102. This will serve as the prerequisite for addi- 
tional courses that the student may wish to elect in biology. 

101-102. General Biology. Staff 

Designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic biolog- 
ical principles and processes. Emphasis is placed on physiology, ecology, 
heredity, embryology and evolution. Three lectures and one two-hour labora- 
tory period a week. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
200. Plant Physiology. Cotter 

A study of the basic principles of plant physiology. Two lectures and one 
3-hour laboratory period a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
240. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Sledge 

A comparative study of the biology of the vertebrates emphasizing phy- 
logeny, physiology, ecology and anatomy. The laboratory will be devoted to 
the dissection of representatives of certain vertebrate classes. One lecture 
and two 3-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
300. General Bacteriology. Groover 

A study of the taxonomy, morphology, and physiology of bacteria. The 
student is introduced to the techniques necessary for the cultivation, investi- 
gation and characterization of bacterial species. Two lectures and two 2-hour 
laboratory periods a week. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
310. Advanced Bacteriology. Groover 

This course deals with the practical application of bacteriological pro- 
cedures to the study of the relations of microorganisms to soil, water, 
sewage, air, milk, foods, industry, and diseases of man and animals. 
Taught in second semester of odd years. Two lectures and two 2-hour 
laboratory periods a week. 

Credit, 4 hours. 



40 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

330. Vertebrate Embryology. Turner 

A study of the development of the vertebrates with special emphasis on 
the developmental anatomy of the chick and pig. Two lectures and one 
3-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: Biology 240. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. General Physiology. Sledge 

Designed to provide the student with a general knowledge of basic 
physiological processes on both the cellular and organ level and to intro- 
duce him to certain laboratory techniques used in studying these processes. 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
360. Field Zoology. Mount 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the local animal 
life, particularly insects, amphibians and reptiles. In addition to collecting 
and identifying various animals, basic principles of ecology are stressed. 
Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period a week. Taught only during 
second semester of odd years and during each summer session. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
370. Field Botany. Cotter 

This course will include a study of the basic ecology of plant commu- 
nities and the effects of the environment on plant life. Two lectures and one 
3-hour laboratory period a week. Taught only during second semester of 
even years and during each summer session. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
380. Invertebrate Zoology. Sledge 

A survey of the invertebrate animal phyla with emphasis on anatomy, 
physiology and evolution. Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period 
a week. Taught first semester of odd years. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
390. Biology of the Lower Plants. Groover 

A survey of the morphology, taxonomy, evolution, and economic im- 
portance of algae, fungi, mosses, and liverworts. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory period a week. Taught first semester of odd years. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
410. Histology. Turner 

Emphasis is placed upon the microscopic study of tissue and organs. 

The preparation of tissues for miscroscopic study is also discussed. Two 

lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Taught first semester 
of even years. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
420. Parasitology. Turner 

A study of some of the important parasites of man, including protozoa, 
flat worms, round worms, and arthropods. Two lectures and one three- 
hour laboratory period a week. Taught second semester of even years. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
430. Genetics. Mount 

A study of the mechanisms of inheritance. Three lectures a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
440. Evolution. Mount 

A study of the phenomenon of organic evolution — the process and its 
products. Three lectures a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
461. Radiation Biology. Cotter 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the characteristics 
of radiation, methods of detection, and some of the biological applicationa 
of radioisotopes. Two lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period a week. 
Taken only with permission of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 41 

480. Special Problems in Biology. Staff 

This course is designed for the junior or senior student who wishes 
to do an individual research problem under the direction of one of the 
staff members of the department. Prerequisite: Grade point average of 
2.00 or above in all biology courses and permission of the instructor. 

Credit, 3-6 hours. 

490. Seminar in Biology. Staff 

Credit, 1 or 2 hours. 

GEOLOGY 

110. Physical Geology. Connell 

A study of earth processes, including the origin of minerals and rocks, 
formation of mountains, weathering and erosive work of streams, waves, 
ground water, wind, and ice. Laboratory work includes recognition of com- 
mon minerals and rocks and interpretation of topographic maps. Two lec- 
tures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
210. Historical Geology. Connell 

A comprehensive study of earth history throughout the several periods 
of geological time, particularly that of North America. An interpretation of 
the sedimentary and organic history of the earth and the various stages of 
life that existed in the past as revealed by fossil evidence. Laboratory work 
includes the study of fossils and their uses, and the interpretation of ge- 
ologic maps. Prerequisite: Geology 110. Three lectures and one three-hour lab- 
oratory period a week. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
231. Regional Geology. Connell 

A study of the surface geology of the Southern States from Virginia to 
Louisiana inclusive. A comprehensive state by state interpretation of the 
sedimentary, structural, and physiographic history of the South, as well as 
the origin and uses of its economic mineral deposits. Prerequisite: Geology 
210. Three lectures a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
240. Field Geology. Connell 

A field course designed to familiarize the student with the outcropping 
rocks of Shelby and surrounding counties. Regularly scheduled field trips to 
be taken to rock quarries, as well as road and stream cuts, where the 
student will observe and decipher the stratigraphy and structure, as well 
as the topography of the entire geologic section. One lecture and one 
four-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites: Geology 110 and 210. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

451. Earth Science for Teachers. Connell 

An accelerated course in physical geology designed to familiarize the 
practicing teacher of junior and senior high school science with the funda- 
mental earth processes. Laboratory work entails familiarization with the 
common rock-forming minerals and rocks, especially those in Alabama. Of- 
fered summers only. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

452. Earth Science for Teachers. Connell 

An accelerated course in historical geology open to practicing teachers 
of junior and senior high school science. A survey of the geological history 
or North America throughout the span of time. The course is designed to 
interpret the sedimentary, structural, and organic history of the continent 
from the Pre-Cambrian through the Recent. Laboratory work includes the 
study of fossils and their uses, and the interpretation of geologic maps. 
Prerequisite: Geology 451. Offered summer only. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



42 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Associate Professors Dunstan, Morgan, Terry; 
Assistant Professors Greene, Oesterling, Sneed. 

Students majoring in business administration or secretarial administration 
should follow the curricula outlined on pages 86 and 87. 

Students minoring in business administration should complete the following 
courses: B.A. 100, 221-22, 261, 362, 370, and 480. B.A. 490 and Economics 430 
are recommended. A minor in secretarial administration shall consist of 18 to 21 
hours with courses selected with the approval of the chairman of the department. 

For business administration majors B.A. 100 and B.A. 222 are prerequisites 
to all other B.A. courses, except shorthand and typewriting. 

100. Business Principles and Policies, Staff 

An analytical and critical study of business responsibilities, organization, 
and management. The social and ethical responsibilities and the human re- 
lations involved in modern business receive attention. In addition, the follow- 
ing topics are studied: the management process, managerial decision mak- 
ing, basic concepts of management, cost analysis, pricing, control, and or- 
ganization theory. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

111. Beginning Typewriting. Morgan, Oesterling, Sneed 

A course in the principles of touch typewriting. Keyboard mastery; 
social and business letter writing, vertical and horizontal centering; manu- 
script writing, tabulation. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

112. Intermediate Typewriting. Morgan, Oesterling, Sneed 

Speed development is stressed; business letters and forms are written 
in quantity. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

201. Beginning Shorthand. Oesterling, Sneed 

The principles of Gregg shorthand — dictation and transcription. Prere- 
quisite: B. A. Ill and B.A. 112 or the equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

202. Intermediate Shorthand. Oesterling, Sneed 

Rapid dictation and transcription which emphasize speed building. Pre- 
requisite: B.A. 201 and a "C" average in B.A. 112. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
221, 222. Principles of Accounting. Dunstan, Greene, Sneed 

Basic principles plus practical application through the use of individual, 
partnership, and corporation practice sets. Special attention is given to pres- 
ent-day payroll procedures. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory a 
week. Prerequisite: B.A. 100, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
261. Marketing. Dunstan, Morgan 

An examination of those principles and policies which affect the market- 
ing of goods and services at the wholesale, retail, and manufacturing level, 
and a study of the agencies which cooperate in the marketing process. Pre- 
requisite: B.A. 100 and sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



300. Personal Finance. Sneed 

to personal income 
of consumer pur- 

Credit, 2 hours. 



A course for non-business majors giving emphasis to personal income 
and expenditures including investments and financing of consumer pur- 
chases. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 

301. Advanced Shorthand. Sneed 

Rapid dictation and transcription with emphasis on transcription and 
production of mailable copy under typical office conditions. Prerequisite: 
B.A. 202. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

320. Cost Accounting. Greene 

Principles of manufacturing and distribution cost accounting. Emphasis 
upon the determination of unit costs for the manufacturer, service costs, 
departmental costs, types of cost systems, the use of cost accounting data 
in administering a business and the measurement of operating results. Pre- 
requisites: B.A. Majors, B.A. 221,222. Non-business Majors, with the con- 
sent of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

321. Intermediate Accounting. Greene 

This course gives a thorough knowledge of the form and content of the 
financial statements with special emphasis on the practices and procedures 
concerning balance sheet accounts. Various accounting concepts and postu- 
lates are stressed as they pertain to the accounts. Prerequisite: B.A. 222. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. Salesmanship. Morgan 

A minute examination of the successful salesman and his methods; a 
study of the psychology employed by the salesman by the use of individual 
sales projects to develop student initiative and poise. Prerequisite: B.A. 
261 and junior standing or consent ©f instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

351. Income Tax Procedure. Greene 

A course designed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
Federal Income Tax Law as it affects individuals. The various types of 
returns are discussed and emphasis will be placed on the determination of 
income and statutory deductions involved in the determination of net taxable 
income. Prerequisite: B.A. 222. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

352. Advertising. Morgan 

A study of the philosophy, psychology, techniques and strategy of ad- 
vertising to give the student a growing awareness that advertising must be 
viewed as part of the total marketing operation. Prerequisite: B.A. 261 and 
junior standing or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
362. Management, I. Terry 

This is a basic course in general management. The following manage- 
ment principles and techniques, applicable in. all fields of business, are 
emphasized: business objectives, policies, functions, leadership, organiza- 
tion, structure and morale, operative procedures, arid control procedures. 
Prerequisites: Economics 201-202, B.A. 100, B.A. 261, or consent of in- 
structor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
370. Business Writing. Morgan, Sneed 

Psychology of business writing. Examination and analysis of actual 
business letters and student preparation of application, sales, credit and 
other types of letters, original investigations and business reports. Pre- 
requisite: Freshmen English. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400. Secretarial Procedures. Sneed 

Analysis of the activities and responsibilities of the secretary with 
particular emphasis on personal factors and specialized duties, office ma- 
chines, and filing. Related work assignments. Prerequisite: B.A. 112, 202. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



44 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

410. Introduction to Data Processing. Greene 

An introductory course in data processing using punched cards. Problems 
involving card designing, key punching, sorting, tabulating, verifying, inter- 
preting, collating, and preparation of reports. Open to students with senior 
standing only. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
461. Management, II. Terry 

A study of organized personnel work including the scientific manage- 
ment movement, the human relations movement, and their impact on per- 
sonnel administration. Prerequisite: B.A. 362. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

471, 472. Research in Business Administration. 

Dunstan, Greene 

A study of the scientific method of research, followed by supervised 
study and investigation of specific problems in the several areas of 
economics and business administration. A written thesis is required. Pre- 
requisite: senior standing. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
480. Business Law. Morgan 

The law underlying business transactions. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
490. Corporation Finance. Sneed 

A basic course in corporation finance covering organization and promo- 
tion, securities, capital structure, short-term financing, expansion, reorgani- 
zation and liquidation. Prerequisite: B.A. 222. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Kennerly; 
Assistant Professors House, Merijanian, Whaley. 

For a major in chemistry see curriculum outlined on page 88. 

For a minor in chemistry a student will take Chemistry 121-122, 201-202 or 
321-322, and elect six hours with the approval of the Chairman of the Department. 

100. Fundamentals of Chemistry. Whaley 

The basic laws of chemistry are studied and an attempt is made to 
relate these laws and principles to various aspects of everyday living ex- 
perience. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
121-122. General Chemistry. Kennerly, House, Merijanian 

A study of the common elements and their related compounds, along 
with the fundamental chemical laws and theories. Required of all students 
majoring in the biological or physical sciences or mathematics. Two lec- 
tures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Credit, 8 hours. 
201-202. Organic Chemistry. Merijanian 

A study is made of the carbon compounds beginning with the hydro- 
carbons of the paraffin series and continuing with a study of aliphatic and 
aromatic compounds. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a 
week. 

Credit, 8 hours. 
210. Qualitative Analysis. House 

A course in qualitative analysis intended to familarize the student with 
the separation and identification of the common metals and acid radicals. 
One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 45 

250. Introductory Biochemistry. Merijanian 

Chemical constituents and reactions of living organisms are studied. Bio- 
physical and biochemical processes in the plant and animal kingdoms are 
stressed. Three lectures a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
321-322. Quantitative Analysis. Kennedy 

A study of the principles of quantitative procedures as employed by 
the analyst. Gravimetric and Volumetric methods are studied with particu- 
lar emphasis being given to the solution of problems of a quantitative na- 
ture. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
350. Organic Qualitative Analysis. Merijanian 

A variety of unknown organic mixtures and compounds are given the 
student to test his ability to separate and classify the substances. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 201-202. One lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods 
a week. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
360. Organic Preparations. Merijanian 

This is primarily a study of laboratory operations and techniques as ap- 
plied to organic chemistry. Particular emphasis is placed on the synthesis of 
the principal classes of organic compounds. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201-202. 
One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
401-402. Physical Chemistry. House 

A study of the nature of gases, liquids, solids and solutions and the 
laws which govern their behavior. The physical constants of these sub- 
stances are determined in the laboratory. Thermo-chemistry and electro- 
chemistry are discussed briefly. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
450. Instrumental Methods of Analysis. House 

A study of the theory and application of physico-chemical methods of 
analysis. Electroanalyticai, optical, chromotographic and special methods are 
considered. Prerequisite: Chemistry 321-322. Two lectures and one three-hour 
laboratory period a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

EDUCATION 

Professor Gormley; Associate Professors Dunn, 

Fancher, Freeze. 

Education courses are designed for prospective teachers, and only with special 
permission may they be taken as general electives. The candidate for a teaching 
certificate must complete the appropriate teacher-education program with at least 
a C average in all courses required for graduation, in both the major and the 
minor field, and in the required professional courses. Any student, moreover, 
whose personal or moral characteristics are judged unsuitable may be denied ad- 
mission to a teacher-education program or may be refused recommendation for a 
teaching certificate. No student who is on either scholastic or conduct probation 
will be allowed to do student teaching. 

Careful note should be taken of the fact that Alabama teaching certificates 
require 6 hours of biology and 6 hours of physical science (chemistry, physics, 
and geology), and also credits in at least two different social sciences. 

Elementary School Teaching 

The student has a choice of two programs, one leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree and the other to the Bachelor of Science degree, both of which meet the 
requirements for an Alabama Class B Elementary Professional Certificate, enabling 
the holder to teach grades one through six. These programs are fully described 
on page 89. 

During the first half of the semester in which student teaching is done, the 
student must be prepared to spend full time in the public school, either in Mon- 
tevallo or in another school system. 



46 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

High School Teaching 

The prospective secondary school teacher must first decide what high school 
subject he will teach, and this will become his major subject. If his major curric- 
ulum includes particular education courses, he can qualify for an Alabama Class 
B Professional Secondary Certificate by taking the courses indicated for each of 
the four years. If specific education courses are not listed in his major curriculum, 
he should take, as "electives," the following courses: 

Psychology 201 3 hours 

Education 320 3 hours 

Psychology 330 3 hours 

Education (High School Methods) 3 hours 

Education (High School Directed Teaching) 6 hours 

Education 480 3 hours 

Education 490 or 422 3 hours 

The first three courses should be completed before the student's senior year. 
The Methods, Directed Teaching, and 480, and 490 will be taken in the same 
semester of the senior year. During the second half of this semester the student 
must be prepared to spend full time in the public school, either in Montevallo 
or in another school system. 

Elementary-Secondary Teaching 

In the fields of art, counseling and guidance, music, physical education, 
speech and speech correction, an Alabama Class B Professional Elementary- 
Secondary Certificate may be obtained. This certificate permits the holder to work at 
all grade levels in the public schools. The detailed curricula for counseling and 
guidance (see Psychology), music, and speech correction include all the courses 
required for the certificate. Majors in art, physical education, and speech who 
wish to qualify for the elementary-secondary certificate should take, as "electives," 
the following courses: 

Psychology 201 3 hours 

Education 320 3 hours 

Psychology 330 3 hours 

Psychology 380 2 hours 

Education (Methods in Elementary & High School) 4 hours 

Education (Directed Teaching in Elementary Grades) 3 hours 

Education (Directed Teaching in High School) 3 hours 

Education 480 3 hours 

Education 490 or 422 3 hours 

The first four courses should be completed before the student's senior year. The 
Methods, Directed Teaching and 480, and 490 will be taken in the same semester 
of the senior year. During the second half of this semester the student must be 
prepared to spend full time in the public school, either in Montevallo or in another 
school system. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

317. Health Education. Finger 

This course is designed to fulfill recommendations of the United States 
Office of Education and the Alabama State Department of Education regard- 
ing health education in schools. It includes the development of points of 
view for cooperative planning for healthful school environment, health services, 
health instruction, and with cooperation between parents, administrators, 
teachers, and the community. Materials for teachers of health courses are 
considered. The course is required of all students with a major in physical 
education. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

320. Principles of Elementary and High School 

Teaching. Staff 

Three major topics are considered: the nature of the American educa- 
tional enterprise, the work of the teacher, and the "availability and use of 
audio-visual materials. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 47 

Materials and Methods in the Elementary 
School Subjects. 

A series of courses dealing with the selection and organization of in- 
structional material and with teaching methods appropriate to the several 
elementary school subjects. Some observation of teaching is included. Courses 
are offered in the following fields: Language Arts, 342; Social Studies 344; 
Arithmetic, 345; Science 348. 

Credit, 2 hours, except for 342 which is 4 hours. 
Materials and Methods in the High School Subjects. 

A group of courses dealing with the selection and organization of in- 
structional material and with teaching methods appropriate to the several 
high school subjects. Some observation of instruction is included. Courses 
are offered in the following fields: 352, English; 353, Foreign Language; 
354, Social Studies; 355, Mathematics; 358, Science; 360, Secretarial Ad- 
ministration. See the respective departmental listings for similar courses in 
art, health and physical education, home economics, music, and speech. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

Materials and Methods in Certain Subjects Taught in 
Both Elementary and High School. 

A group of courses dealing with the selection and organization of in- 
structional material and methods appropriate to certain subjects taught in 
both elementary and high school. See the following departmental announce- 
ments: Art 361, Health and Physical Education 367, and Speech 368. 

Credit, 4 hours. 

370. Directed Observation in the Elementary 

School. Dunn 

This course, an introduction to directed teaching, includes observation 
and discussion of classroom management and of the teaching of all elemen- 
tary school subjects. Credit, 2 hours. 

400. Audio-Visual Materials. 

Offered summer session only. Credit 3 hours 

422. History of American Education. Gormley 

The history of American education, from colonial beginnings to recent 
happenings is supplemented by brief consideration of the development of 
education in Alabama. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
430. Seminar for Elementary Teachers. Staff 

This course, which should be taken concurrently with Education 440, 
deals with problems that arise from experiences in the Elementary School. 
Usually evaluation and social studies methods and materials are dealt with 
in some detail. 

Credit, 4 hours. 

440. Directed Teaching and Observation in the 

Elementary School. Staff 

The student observes and teaches under the direction of a supervising 
teacher. 

Credit, 4 or 6 hours. 

450. Directed Teaching and Observation in the 

High School. Staff 

The student observes and teaches under the guidance of a supervising 
teacher in either the major or minor field or both. The courses and num- 
bers are as follows: Art 451, English 452, Foreign Languages 453, Social 
Studies 454, Mathematics 455, Music 456, Physical Education 457, Science 
458, Speech 459, Secretarial Administration 460. 

Credit, 6 hours. 



48 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

461. Evaluation in Elementary and Secondary 

Education. Staff 

Major topics include the construction of achievement tests, the selection 
of certain kinds of standardized tests, and some of the more elementary- 
statistical techniques needed for making or choosing tests and for using test 
results. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
469, 479. Clinical Practice. Wright 

(See Speech Correction 469, 479.) 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
All. Introduction to the Exceptional Child. Roe, Wright 

Principles and philosophy of educational provisions for children who, 
because of physical and psychological deviations from the normal, can 
profit best through special education. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

480. Seminar for Secondary Teachers. Staff 

This seminar should be taken concurrently with Directed Teaching. It 
consists of the study of problems that arise from contacts within the high 
school. Special attention is given to the curriculum-, guidance, evaluation, 
and understanding the adolescent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

481. The Elementary School Program. Dunn 

This course is open to a limited number of students who evidence 
qualities of leadership. In it they gain practical experience by participating 
in the programs of nearby county schools. They also visit a variety of 
urban and rural schools in the state. May be taken in lieu of Education 422. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
490. Philosophy of Education. Gormley 

An introduction to the terminology and problems of philosophy is fol- 
lowed by a comparative analysis of several present-day educational phi- 
losophies. Senior standing is desirable. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 



ENGLISH 

Professor Golson; Associate Professors Lott, Meroney, 
Puryear; Instructors Adams, Berry, Blackmon, 

Cobb, Elder. 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

Students who major in English must take 30 hours in English courses num- 
ered 200 or above, including 241-242, 341, 342, 350, 450, and 490. 

Students who minor in English must take 18 hours in English courses num- 
bered 200 or above. 

101-102. Freshman English. Staff 

Practice writing in commonly used forms of composition and reading for 
ideas. Prerequisite to all other courses in English. (H101-102, a special 
course, is open only to nonors students.) 

Credit, 6 hours. 
241, 242. Major British Writers. Staff 

A study of the most important British authors from Chaucer to T. S. 
Eliot. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in literature except by permis- 
sion of the chairman of the department. (A special section, H241-242 will 
be provided for Honors students only.) Required of all English majors. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 49 

310. Literature for Children. Puryear 

Selecting, reading, and evaluating literature for children. Required in 
the elementary curriculum. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
320. World Literature. Lott 

Reading in English of the masterpieces of the world. Lectures, discus- 
sions, reports. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
331. The Novel. Cobb 

Reading and discussions of major novels, with emphasis on novels of 
the twentieth century. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
341, 342. American Literature. Meroney 

A survey of American literature with emphasis on the major nineteenth 
century writers. Required of all English majors. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

350. Advanced Grammar. Puryear 

A study of English grammar and usage, including consideration of the 
traditional approach and modern developments. Required of all English ma- 
jors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

351. Literature of the Bible. Lott 

A study of selected books of the Old and New Testaments. Emphasis is 
placed upon literary form and literature value. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
361, 362. Creative Writing. Cobb 

Guided writing in poetry, short story, essay, play. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 
390. English Drama. Golson 

A survey of English drama from its beginnings through the eighteenth 
century (exclusive of Shakespeare). 

Credit, 3 hours. 

420. Literature and Southern Life. Meroney 

Credit, 3 hours. 

440. The Age of Classicism in England: 1660-1790. Golson 

Credit, 3 hours. 

450. Shakespeare. 

Required of all English majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

451. Modern Poetry. Lott 

A study of major British and American poets of the twentieth century. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

460. Modern Drama. 

European and American drama since 1890, with historical and literary 
backgrounds. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

461. Victorian Literature. Lott 

Studies of major Victorian writers (exclusive of the novel). 

Credit, 3 hours. 



50 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

470. Spenser, Milton, and Their Times. Puryear 

Credit, 3 hours. 

490. Chaucer. Golson 

Some study of all the major works, with detailed attention to selected 
portions. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Assistant Professor Elliott; Instructors Gorgey, Harris, 
Mayfield, Quiroz, Sears, Tolbert. 

MAJOR AND MINOR REQUIREMENTS 

A major and minor are offered in French and Spanish. See curriculum outlined 
on page 82. 

FRENCH 

For a major in French, 24 hours in courses beyond the first year are required, 
including 300, 310, and 351, 352. For a minor in French, 18 hours beyond the first 
year are required, including 351, 352. 

101-102. Elementary French. Staff 

Four class meetings and one laboratory period required per week. 

Credit, 8 hours. 
* 131-132. Elementary French. Credit, 2 hours. 

202-202. Intermediate French. Staff 

One laboratory period required per week. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
300. French Conversation. Staff 

Required of French majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
310. Advanced French Grammar and Composition. Staff 

Required of French majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
351, 352. Survey of French Literature. Staff 

Required of French majors and minors. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

400. French Drama to 1700. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

410. Nineteenth Century French Drama. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

420. Nineteenth Century French Novel. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

430. Twentieth Century French Literature. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

GERMAN 

101-102. Elementary German. Staff 

Four class meetings and one laboratory period required per week. 

Credit, 8 hours. 



*For students with two high school units who demonstrate lack of proficiency to 
qualify for 201-202. Four class meetings and one laboratory per week. 






DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



51 



*131-132. Elementary German. 
201-202. Intermediate German. 

One laboratory period required per week. 

300. German Conversation. 



LATIN 



101-102. Elementary Latin. 

* 131-132. Elementary Latin. 
201-202. Intermediate Latin. 



Credit, 2 hours. 
Staff 

Credit, 6 hours. 

Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

Staff 
Credit, 8 hours. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

Staff 
Credit, 6 hours. 



SPANISH 



For a major in Spanish, 24 hours in courses beyond the first year are required, 
including 300, 310, and 351,352. For a minor in Spanish, 18 hours beyond the first 
year are required, including 351, 352. 

101-102. Elementary Spanish. Staff 

Four class meetings and one laboratory period required per week. 

Credit, 8 hours. 
* 131-132. Elementary Spanish. 



201-202. Intermediate Spanish. 

One laboratory period required per week 

300. Spanish Conversation. 

Required of Spanish majors. 



Credit, 2 hours. 
Staff 

Credit, 6 hours. 
Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 
310. Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition. Staff 

Required of Spanish majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
351, 352. Survey of Spanish Literature. Staff 

Required of Spanish majors and minors. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

361, 362. Survey of Spanish American Literature. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

400. Spanish Drama of the Golden Age. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

410. Nineteenth Century Spanish Drama. Staff 

Credit, 3 hours. 

Staff 
Credit, 3 hours. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



420. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. 
470. The Generation of 1898. 



♦For students with two high school units who demonstrate lack of proficiency to 
qualify for 201-202. Four class meetings and one laboratory per week. 



52 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Professors Palmer, Finger; Associate Professors Anderson, 
Collins, Lightfoot, Myrick; Assistant Professors Crew, Davis. 

The Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation encompasses 
three different areas of education. These areas are closely related but have fea- 
tures and functions which distinguish each from the other. 

The Department, in Health Education, offers courses in personal and commu- 
nity health, first aid, and health education in schools (required of physical edu- 
cation majors). 

The department offers a wide selection of activity courses to meet the general 
education requirements in physical education and special professional courses de- 
signed for the undergraduate major in physical education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY PROGRAM 

The Department offers a variety of activity courses planned to meet the needs 
and interest of all students. Students may select courses in accordance with their 
individual needs and interests. These physical education activity courses are de- 
signed to meet the four-semester requirement in general education. Students with 
a physical disability are assigned to special classes. Activity courses in physical 
education are required of all students in the freshman and sophomore years. 
Juniors and seniors may select courses listed in the catalog as elective courses for 
credit and may audit activity courses with the permission of the Dean and the 
instructor. Each student is required to purchase a regulation gymnasium suit 
available at the College Supply Store at the approximate cost of $7.00. Women 
students should bring a heavy sweater or jacket to wear with the gymnasium suit. 
Men students should wear a regulation warm-up suit available also at the College 
Supply Store. Tennis shoes and basketball shoes are available at the Supply Store. 
Regulation swimming suits are furnished by the College. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Department offers courses leading to the Bachelor's Degree. The profession- 
al curriculum in physical education is designed to prepare the students in basic 
knowledges, skills, understandings, and competencies which will make it possible 
for him to demonstrate, teach, administer, and supervise activities required in 
a sound program of physical education. The curriculum leading to a Bachelor of 
Science degree with a major in physical education is based upon the study of 
natural sciences, social sciences, and health (for requirements see page 90). 
Courses in the humanities are required to insure a broad basic education essential 
to students who desire to hold positions of responsibility in this field. The pro- 
gram is designed to develop a skillful and broadly educated individual, not to 
develop narrow specialists. 

Students majoring in physical education at Alabama College can be qualified 
to fill positions in elementary and secondary schools, American Red Cross, YMCA, 
YWCA, Boy Scouts, and recreation positions in church, community, and industry. 

Regulation gymnasium suits for women physical education majors are avail- 
able at the Supply Store and cost approximately $16.00. Regulation suits for men 
physical education majors are available at the Supply Store and cost approxi- 
mately $12.00. 

For a minor in physical education, eighteen to twenty-four hours are required 
including the following courses: Physical Education 192-392 and Physical Educa- 
tion 361, 362, 367, 370, 380. Students should consult the Chairman of the 
Department before selecting the other courses. 

ACTIVITY COURSES OPEN TO MAJORS AND NON-MAJORS 

The following courses comprise the activity programs and students should take 
beginning, intermediate, or advanced sections according to previous training and 
ability. Beginning and intermediate courses are prerequisites to advanced courses. 

In the activities marked (MW), men and women students may enroll in the 
same classes. Where the activities are marked (M) and (W), the activities are 
open to both men and women but separate classes are held. Activities open only 
to men are marked (M) and those open only to women are marked (W). 

Activities may be elected according to interest, capacity and physical condi- 
tion of the student. Two hours a week, credit, 1 hour each semester. 

Students desiring credit for physical education activities in addition to the 
four semester requirement may enroll in any activity other than those for which 
they have previously received credit. Two hours a week, credit 1 hour each 
semester. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



53 



100 Canoeing (MW) — 
Anderson 

102 Basketball (M) — Davis 

103 Calisthenics (M) — 
Light foot 

104 Soccer (M) — Davis 

105 Volleyball and Soft- 
ball (M) — Davis 

106 Volleyball and Calis- 
thenics (M) — Lightfoot 

107 Track and Field (M) — 
Anderson 

108 Touch Football (M) — 
Davis 

109 Tumbling (M) — Anderson 

111 Softball (M) — Lightfoot 

112 Volleyball (M) — Davis 

120 Casting (MW)— Collins 

122 Beginning Archery 
(MW) — Anderson, My rick 

123 Beginning Badminton 
(MW)— Lightfoot 

125 Folk Dance (MW) — 
Crew 

126 Beginning Golf 
(MW)— Palmer 

127 Beginning Swimming 
(MW) — Anderson, Myrick 
and Staff 

128 Beginning Tennis 
(MW)— Davis 

130 Games and Recreational 
Sports (MW) — Myrick 

135 Beginning Modern 
Dance (MW)— Crew 

136 Intermediate Golf 
(MW)— Finger 

137 Intermediate Swimming I 
(MW)— Anderson 



138 Intermediate Tennis 
(MW)— Finger 

145 Intermediate Modern 
Dance (MW)— Crew 

147 Intermediate Swimming II 
(MW)— Myrick 

148 Advanced Tennis 
(MW)— Finger 

150 Recreational Sports 
(MW)— Staff 

155 Advanced Modern Dance. 
(MW)— Crew 

157 Synchronized Swim- 
ming (MW) — Crew 

165 Beginning Social Dance 
(MW)— Crew 

167 Life Saving (MW) — 
Anderson 

177 Water Safety Instruc- 
tors (MW) — Myrick 

185 Beginning Square Dance 
(MW)— Crew 

195 Intermediate Square 
Dance (MW)— Crew 

202 Basketball (W) — Collins 

203 Calisthenics (W) — 
Myrick 

204 Soccer and Speedball 
(W)— Collins 

205 Volleyball (W) — Myrick 

206 Volleyball and Basket- 
ball (W) — Myrick and 
Collins 

207 Basketball and Softball 
(W)— Collins and Myrick 

208 Softball (W) — Myrick 

209 Tumbling (W)— Myrick 



54 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
HEALTH EDUCATION 

110. Personal and Community Health. Staff 

This course deals with problems of personal and community health, 
and is designed for the students to develop a broad understanding of their 
obligation to themselves and society in matters of health. Two hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

300. First Aid — Prevention and Emergency Care of 

Injuries. Anderson 

Instruction in the various phases of first aid: American Red Cross 
Standard, Advanced and Instructor's First Aid certificates awarded. Special 
emphasis is placed upon the prevention of accidents in the gymnasium, 
swimming pool, playground, school, home and community and on the proper 
first aid treatment of such emergencies when they occur. Credit not ap- 
plicable to four-hour requirement in physical education. Two hours a week. 
(Standard course, 1 hour credit; Standard, Advanced and Instructor's 
course, 2 hour credit.) 

Credit, 1 or 2 hours. 
317. Health Education. Finger 

(See Education 317) Two hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

191, 192. Introduction to Physical Education. Staff 

An introduction to the philosophy of Health, Physical Education and 
the following activities: Team Sports, Tennis, Swimming, and Calisthenics. 
Six hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours first semester; 
3 hours second semester. 

291, 292. Sports, Games, and Dance. Staff 

Games, folk dance, modern dance, team sports, tennis, and swimming. 

Required of all sophomores with a major in Health, Physical Education 

and Recreation. Prerequisites: Physical Education 191, 192. Six hours a 
week. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 
320. Physical Education in Elementary School. Myrick 

A course designed to provide knowledge and appreciation of the total 
physical education program in the elementary school. Basic principles de- 
signed for elementary school teachers in program planning, selection of 
activities and procedures at the elementary school level. Emphasis is given 
to health and safety in the elementary school. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

347. Methods and Materials in Health Education and 

Physical Education in the Elementary School. Myrick 

Two hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

357. Methods and Materials in Health Education and 

Physical Education in the High School. Palmer 

Two hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 55 

367. Methods and Materials in Health Education and Physi- 
cal Education in the Elementary and High School. 

Myrick 

Credit, 4 hours. 



Four hours a week. 






361, 362. Coaching of Team Sports. (M) (W) Staff 

This course deals with coaching methods for the various major sports 
including discussion of strategy, conditioning, schedule making, and other 
coaching problems. Required of all juniors with a major in Health, Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation. Two hours a week with laboratory experi- 
ence in the college classes and intramurals. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
370. Principles of Physical Education. Finger 

A study of fundamental principles designed to help prospective teachers 
develop the modern concept of physical education as an integral part of all 
education. Consideration is given to the scientific backgrounds of the pro- 
fession and an understanding of some of its problems and practices. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

380. Physiology of Exercise. Palmer 

An examination of physiological principles as they apply to vigorous 
muscular activity. Lectures, demonstrations and experiments designed to 
increase understanding of physiological changes which occur during vigorous 
activity and the effects of such changes upon human performance. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

381. Fundamentals of Movement and Kinesiology. Collins 

Discussion of the fundamental movements made by the body in carry- 
ing on the common activities of life. Theory of joint mechanisms and mus- 
cular movements. Application of fundamentals to various sports. Required 
of all juniors with a major in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101-102, 240; Physical Education 291-292. Three hours 
a week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
391, 392. Sports and Games. Staff 

This course includes tennis, archery, social recreation, swimming, tumb- 
ling and calisthenics. Required of all juniors with a major in Health, Phys- 
ical Education and Recreation. Prerequisite: Physical Education 291-292. 
Six hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

400. Problems of the Curriculum in Health and 

Physical Education. Finger 

A study of selected problems in the areas of health and physical edu- 
cation. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
420. Evaluation in Physical Education. Palmer 

The place and purpose of evaluation in Physical Education. Examina- 
tion and description of the tools and techniques necessary in appraising 
the extent to which Physical Education objectives are achieved. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

All. Physical Education for the Physically 

Handicapped. Collins 

The content, organization, and conduct of (1) activities designed for 
individuals with permanent or temporary physical limitations and (2) activ- 
ities designed to prevent and to aid in recovery from athletic injuries. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



56 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

482. Organization and Administration of Health and 

Physical Education. Finger 

Analysis of problems involved in the direction of health and physical 
education programs in elementary and secondary schools. Required of sen- 
iors with a major in Physical Education. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
491, 492. Sports and Dance. Staff 

This course is required of senior majors in Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation who have not met the skill requirements in activities. 

Credit, 1 or 2 hours each semester. 

RECREATION 

140. Techniques in Camping Education. Collins 

The emphasis of this course is placed on the mastery of and experience 
with the specific activities of the camp program such as outdoor cookery, 
camp craft, hand craft, nature lore, overnight trips, camp music, evening 
and rainy day programs, programs for special events, dramatics, and other 
related activities. Credit is not applicable to four-hour requirement in physi- 
cal education. Three hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
350. Techniques in Social Recreation. 

Designed to present materials and develop skills through practice in 
that phase of the recreation program known as social recreation. Members 
of the class receive actual experience in conducting these activities under 
supervision. Activities for special occasions, holidays and home parties are 
planned and conducted for a variety of age groups including the home, 
community and school. Credit not applicable to four-hour requirement in 
physical education. Three hours a week. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
360. Principles of Recreation. Finger 

A study of principles basic to the broad field of recreation with spe- 
cial emphasis on the relationship of recreation to education and on recrea- 
tional leadership in community recreation, club activities, and voluntary 
organizations. Two hours a week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
430, 440. Community Recreation. 

This course is designed to give senior majors in Health, Physical Edu- 
cation and Recreation and minors in Recreation an opportunity to do field 
work in community recreation with groups in neighboring communities. Stu- 
dents meet with committees from the local communities and plan and con- 
duct programs based on the needs and interests of the group. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 57 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Associate Professors Bickham, Larkin, Owsley; Assistant 

Professors Folsom, Healey, Lightsey; Assistant Supervisors 

Blackburn, Coe, Cotney, Dawson, Phillips. 

The Department of Home Economics offers three major curricula (see pages 
91 and 92) which prepare a student to enter vocational home economics educa- 
tion, institution economics, or retail economics. 

The institution economics curriculum prepares for dietetic training in hospitals, 
recognized by the American Dietetic Association, in which the term of training 
varies from nine months to one year. This curriculum also provides training in 
food administration work in colleges, school lunchrooms, commercial cafeterias, 
tearooms and club houses. Supervised experience is provided through the College 
food department and the public school lunchrooms. 

The retail economics curriculum offers training for those interested in depart- 
ment store opportunities, costume design, interior decoration, and distributive edu- 
cation. The field of retailing includes work in buying and selling merchandise; ad- 
vertising and display; the placing and training of personnel; and work in control 
and other non-selling departments. This curriculum offers courses that give the 
necessary background for this work and also provides supervised experience in 
leading department stores in Birmingham, Atlanta and Dallas. Through individual 
conferences, each student is guided in selecting the subjects which best fit her 
needs and her interests so that she is prepared to enter the phase of work in which 
she wishes to participate. 

Majors in art and secretarial administration may minor in retail economics by 
taking a minimum of eighteen hours in their junior and senior years. 

The vocational home economics education curriculum prepares students for 
teaching home economics in the secondary schools of Alabama. Completion of this 
curriculum qualifies a student for a Class B Secondary Professional Certificate. 

In addition to class work, students are guided by home economics faculty 
members in planning and evaluating homemaking experiences which they carry out 
in their own homes. These experiences are designed to supplement and broaden the 
students' class experiences. 

A minor in general home economics may be had, provided the following re- 
quirements are met: foods, four hours; clothing, four hours; house, three hours; 
child development, three hours; home management, two hours; electives in home 
economics, two hours. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

460. Problems in Home Economics. Staff 

An individual problem, selected by the student with approval of the 
Chairman of the Department, is worked out with guidance and supervision 
of an assigned staff member. Hours to be arranged. 

Credit, 1 to 4 hours. 

THE FAMILY 

200. Health of the Family. Lightsey 

A study of public and preventive health measures as affecting family 
health; prevention of accidents in the home; home care of the sick; preser- 
vation of wholesome mental attitudes. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
-)r 230. Managing the Family Income. Lightsey 

A study of the relationships and adjustments in family living with 
special emphasis on the influence of relations in the family on individual 
members. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



58 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

391. Guidance of the Young Child. Bickham 

This course gives the student basic information for understanding the 
interaction of the child and his family with emphasis on forces influencing 
the relationship. The principles of guidance of the young child are applied 
to the home and nursery school situation. The student is given an opportu- 
nity to observe, interpret, and guide the behavior of the child in the home 
and nursery school. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

392. Child Development. Bickham 

A study of the development from infancy to school age, with emphasis 
on the factors affecting the pattern. The nursery school laboratory gives the 
student an opportunity to observe, interpret, and guide the behavior and de- 
velopment of the pre-school child. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
402. Family Living. 

Deals with certain psychological and philosophical aspects of family 
life, including the impact of the family on the personality of its members; 
skills and techniques for effective inter-personal relations; and the relation 
of family to the community. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 

THE HOUSE AND ITS ADMINISTRATION 

310. Home Furnishings. Owsley 

Basic consideration in cleaning and arranging home furnishings, includ- 
ing furniture, floor covering, linens, silver, dinnerware, and glassware. 
Laboratory problems in making household furnishings. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
320. The House and Its Equipment. Lightsey 

Basic consideration in selection of a house, including the planning of 
adequate storage spaces and working centers. The selection and care of 
household equipment. Laboratory problems in the renovation of furniture. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
430. Home Management. Lightsey 

A study of the best use of family resources of time, money, and energy. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
440. House Residence. Lightsey 

Residence in the home management house including meal planning and 
preparation; schedule of household organization; and informal entertaining. 

Credit, 4 hours, 
CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 
150. Introduction to Clothing. Owsley 

An introduction to clothing selection as to line and color. Study of in- 
telligent buying of ready-to-wear so that the best use is obtained by the 
consumer. Also an introduction to construction technique within the range 
of the individual student. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
250. Textiles. Owsley 

The study of textile fabrics, their use, texture, and durability. This in- 
cludes the study of natural and man-made fibers, yarn construction, weave, 
finish and dyeing. Required of all home economics and retail economics 
majors. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 59 

350. Clothing Construction and Fitting. Owsley 

Fitting and pattern alteration and pattern construction are taught through 
the making of a suit or coat. Wool and rayon construction are taught to 
develop standards in construction skills and costume designing. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 150. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
352. Personal Problems in Clothing. Owsley 

A non-technical course in clothing open to students not majoring in 
home economics. A brief study of the textile fibers, their physical charac- 
teristics, dyeing and finishing as they affect selection and care. A study 
of color, proportion and line in relation to the individual. A study of per- 
sonal clothing problems. Construction of two garments. No prerequisite. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
360. Laboratory Experience in Selling. 

A course open to juniors who wish to gain experience in a department 
store. Sixteen Saturdays and vacation days will be spent working in a Bir- 
mingham department store subject to the approval of the store and the 
Department of Home Economics. 

Credit, 1 hour. 

451. Retail Merchandising. 

Study of retailing with special emphasis on department store organiza- 
tion and policies. Emphasis is placed upon the study of merchandising and 
customers. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

452. Advanced Clothing Design. Owsley 

Construction of a tight-fitted lining as a foundation for modeling with- 
out a commercial pattern. Development of design in cotton and rayon 
through the technique of drafting, flat pattern designing, and draping. Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 350. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
461. Supervised Experience in Department Stores. 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 360. 

Credit, 5 hours. 

FOODS AND NUTRITION 

170. Introduction to Foods. Folsom 

Principles of food preparation and selection with introduction to the 
planning of meals and nutrition. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
272. Food and Its Preparation. Folsom 

A non-technical course open to students not majoring in home economics. 
A study of standard methods of cookery; individual nutrition requirements; 
selection of food in relation to needs and cost; planning, preparing and 
serving simple meals. No prerequisite. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
300. Feeding the Family. 

A study of the nutritional needs of individual members of the family; 
planning adequate meals; purchasing food. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
370. Food Preparation and Service. Folsom 

A study of the methods of food preparation and menu planning, stress- 
ing food selection, organization of work; purchase and cost of food; and 
table service. Prerequisite: Home Economics 170. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



60 ALABAMA COLLEGE 



372. Quantity Cookery. Folsom 

This course includes the serving of special meals such as dinners, school 
lunches, teas, parties, and banquets, and choice of appropriate decoration 
and entertainment for the various occasions. Emphasis on organization and 
cost of large quantity preparation and service. Prerequisite: Home Economics 
370. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

380. Nutrition and Dietetics. Folsom 

A study of food requirements, nutritive value of food and the choice 
and use of food for the maintenance and advancement of positive health 
and vitality. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

381. Institution Administration. Folsom 

A study of the organization of administrative work in hospitals, resi- 
dence halls, cafeterias, and other institutional groups. Institutional philoso- 
phy, personnel policies, job analysis, records and cost accounting for insti- 
tutions. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

382. Advanced Institution Administration. Folsom 

A study of physical equipment, time schedules, quantity buying, and 
menu planning for specific institution groups. Includes laboratory work. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
470. Investigation in Cookery. Folsom 

Study of factors affecting standard products, including ingredients, pro- 
portions, methods, temperatures, utensils and appliances. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
480. Readings in Nutrition. 

Reports of current nutritional research. 

Credit, 1 hour. 
482. Advanced Nutrition and Diet Therapy. Folsom 

A study of dietary modifications necessary in certain special and ab- 
normal cases. An average of C in Home Economics is required for enroll- 
ment in the course. Prerequisites: Home Economics 380; senior standing in 
home economics. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

390. Methods of Teaching Home Economics in 

High School. Larkin 

A study of the basic philosophy of homemaking and its relation to 
general and vocational education; desirable characteristics and competen- 
cies of the homemaking teacher; techniques of guiding high school students 
in problem solving experiences that contribute to their total development 
as individuals and family members. Opportunities are provided for directed 
observation in high school homemaking classes, and for study of methods 
and materials of instruction. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
490. Supervised Teaching in Home Economics. Larkin 

Supervised teaching and observation in vocational home economics classes 
and participation in guiding pupils in carrying out directed home experi- 
ences that are integrated with class work. Each student teacher has guided 
experience with the homemaking teacher's responsibilities in the total "home- 
making program. This course is closely integrated with Home Economics 
390, 491. 

Credit, 6 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 61 

491. Vocational Education in Home Economics. Larkin 

A study of the organization and administration of the over-all voca- 
tional program, its function in the school community, and relation to the 
State Department of Education. Emphasis is placed on techniques of teach- 
er-student planning, evaluation of learning experiences and ways of secur- 
ing parent participation in judging student progress. This course is required 
of all majors in vocational home economics and is closely integrated with 
Home Economics 490 in order to provide contact with the high school home- 
making program throughout the senior year. 

Credit, 4 hours. 

MUSIC 

Professor Davis; Associate Professors Lumby, Stewart, 

Tolbert; Assistant Professors Cowan, Middaugh, 

Pritchett, Strom; Instructors Behrendt, 

Benejam, Moeck, Thomas. 

ADMISSION 

The general requirements for admission to the Department of Music are the 
same as the requirements for admission to the College. Students are accepted con- 
ditionally in music and are not given permanent ranking as music majors until 
they have proven to the satisfaction of the faculty that they can progress success- 
fully to the various degrees of advancement. All music majors will be given an 
audition in their primary performing medium as soon as possible in the fall. Those 
whom the faculty believe to be deficient will be required to take applied music 
without credit until the deficiency is removed. 

Advanced standing in music from an accredited institution will be accepted 
conditionally at the time of entrance and final credit will be extended after the 
work in residence proves acceptable. 

Elective courses in music may be taken by students who are majoring in other 
fields. Work at any degree of advancement in applied music is possible. 

DEGREES 

Three degrees may be earned in music. The Bachelor of Music Degree provides 
an emphasis upon organ, piano, voice, string or wind instruments, or composition. 
The Bachelor of Music Education Degree is designed for those who plan to teach in 
the public schools or teach in private studios. The Bachelor of Music Education 
Degree earns a state teaching certificate. The Bachelor of Arts Degree provides 
more emphasis on the liberal arts than the Bachelor of Music or the Bachelor of 
Music Education Degrees. See pages 82, 94-96 for outlines of curricula. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Department of Music is a member of the National Association of Schools 
of Music, and its curricula are organized in conformity with the requirements of 
the Association. 

APPLIED MUSIC 

Piano 101,102, 201,202 301, 302, 401, 402 

Organ 103, 104, 203, 204, 303, 304, 403, 404 

Voice 105, 106, 205, 206, 305, 306, 405, 406 

Wind Instruments 107, 108, 207, 208, 307, 308, 407, 408 

String Instruments 109, 110, 209, 210, 309, 310, 409, 410 Staff 

One or two half-hour lessons per week. One hour of practice daily is 
required for each hour of credit. 



Credit, 1 to 4 hours each semester. 



62 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Choir 131, 132, 231, 232, 331, 332, 431, 432 
Chorale 133, 134, 233, 234, 333, 334, 433, 434 
Orchestra 135, 136, 235, 236, 335, 336, 435, 436 
Chamber Music 137, 138, 237, 238, 337, 338, 437, 438 
Opera 139, 140, 239, 240, 339, 340, 439, 440 

Wind Ensemble 143, 144, 243, 244, 343, 344, 443, 444 Staff 

Credit, or 1 hour each semester. 

BASIC MUSIC 

111-112. Fundamentals of Music. Strom 

An effort to correlate the ear, fingers, and mind as they deal with the 
fundamentals of music. The writing, hearing, and playing of the integration 
of rhythm and phrase in simple tonality. Analysis, transposition and im- 
provisation at the keyboard. 

Credit, 8 hours. 
211-212. Fundamentals of Music. Strom 

Sight singing, ear training, keyboard harmony, creative writing stress- 
ing melody and harmonization, tonality and modulation, altered and aug- 
mented chords, improvisation, foreign tones, beginning of contrapuntal 
writing. Prerequisite: 111-112. 

Credit, 8 hours. 

320. Form and Analysis. Davis 

A study of the structure of music through aural and visual analysis of 
the more common musical forms. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

321, 322. Style, Design, and Creative Writing. Strom 

Analysis of structure of music in various schools of writing, beginning 
with the contrapuntal. Composition in the smaller forms. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
341, 342. Counterpoint. Strom 

A study of strict counterpoint in two, three, and four parts. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
421, 422. Composition. Benejam 

Analysis of music of the more contemporary schools of writing. Com- 
position in larger forms. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
441, 442. Orchestration. Stewart 

A study of instrumentation including history, ranges, and tonal charac- 
teristics of instruments. Elementary scoring. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
491 , 492. Conducting. Stewart 

A study of baton technique, instrumental and choral rehearsal techniques. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
LITERATURE OF MUSIC 
121, 122. Introduction to Music Literature. Davis 

A course designed for the non-music major who has little or no music 
training. The purpose is the preparation for more intelligent music listening. 
Correlation with musical activity on the campus will be made. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

151, 152. Music Literature. Cowan 

A course designed for the music major and minor. An introduction to 
perceptive listening, including a study of the various forms of music from 
the Baroque period through the contemporary. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
351, 352. Music Literature. Davis 

A survey of the history of music. Prerequisite: Music 121, 122, or 
151, 152. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
420. A History of American Music. Stewart 

This course deals with the several stages of development from the 
Puritan psalm singers to the present, with special references to European 
and other influences. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
451, 452. Music Literature. Davis 

A study of 20th Century Music. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

CHURCH MUSIC 

371. Liturgy. Lumby 

A study of the historical and musical aspects of Judeo-Christian traditions. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

372. Hymnology. Lumby 

A study of Christian hjmnic literature. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
All, All. The Church Service. Lumby 

Training in service playing for organists. Emphasis on improvisation, 
transposition, modulation, open score reading. Materials and methods rele- 
vant to directing a church music program. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

MUSIC FOR THE VOCALIST 

261, 262. Diction. Middaugh 

Italian, French, and German diction, including a minimum of grammar 
and a maximum of vocabulary taken from song literature. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

COURSES FOR THE TEACHER 

216, 226. String Pedagogy. Bene jam 

A study of the basic principles of string instruments and their tech- 
niques. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
316, 326. Woodwind Pedagogy. Stewart 

A study of basic principles and techniques of woodwind instrument per- 
formance; selection and care of woodwind instruments; methods and materials. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

?>A6. Teaching of Music in the Elementary 

School. Pritchett 

A course designed for the music education major to prepare the stu- 
dent to teach or supervise music in the elementary school. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



64 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

356. Teaching of Music in the High School. Pritchett 

A course designed to prepare the music education major to teach or 
supervise music in the secondary school. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
361, 362. Vocal Pedagogy. Tolbert 

A study of the principles of teaching voice, vocal terminology and 
anatomy, and a survey of teaching procedures. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
566. Piano Pedagogy. Thomas 

A study of methods and materials of piano teaching. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
381, 382. Brasswind Pedagogy. Moeck 

A study of basic principles and techniques of brasswind instrument per- 
formance; selection and care of brasswind instruments; methods and materials. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
400. School Music for the Elementary Teacher. Stewart 

A study to assist the non-musically trained elementary teacher to meet 
the needs of the class in music. Experience in singing and reading music, 
general appreciation on the adult level, as well as that of the child. A 
study of materials and procedures. 

Credit, 4 hours. 

446. Directed Teaching of Music at the 

Elementary School Level. Pritchett 

Credit, 4 hours. 

456. Directed Teaching of Music at the 

Secondary School Level. Pritchett 

Credit, 4 or 8 hours. 

476. Music Education Seminar. Pritchett 

A post-internship designed to afford an opportunity for thorough discus- 
sion of problems arising from the intern teaching experience, and for a sur- 
vey of related literature. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Professor Weaver 

A student may minor in philosophy by taking a minimum of fifteen hours in 
philosophy and three additional hours in a related subject approved by the Dean 
of the College and the Department Chairman. 

A minor in religion may be obtained by taking twelve hours in religion, 
Philosophy 250, and an additional three-hour course which meets the approval of 
the Dean of the College and the Department Chairman. 

PHILOSOPHY 

200. Introduction to Philosophy. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the field of 
philosophy. Some of the language of philosophy, issues, problems, and points 
of view are dealt with. 

Credit, 3 hours. 






DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

210. Introduction to Logic. 

Primarily a treatment of traditional deductive and inductive reasoning. 
Some attention is given to semantics and common evasions of the law of 
rationality. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
220. Introduction to Ethics. 

A study is made of representative ethical theories of classical and mod- 
ern times. Emphasis is placed upon the application of these theories to con- 
temporary problems of moral philosophy. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

250. Philosophy of Religion. 

A study is made of the nature of religion and some of its manifesta- 
tions. Some problems of religion are discussed. Consideration is given to 
evidence for a religious world view. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
300. History of Early European Philosophy. 

The student is introduced to ancient and medieval philosophy through a 
study of the systems evolved in these periods and through the reading of 
selections from the works of the principal philosophers. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
310. History of Modern Philosophy. 

A study of the thought of outstanding individuals since the medieval 
period together with selected readings from the works of these philosophers. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
320. Aesthetics. 

An analysis of the nature of beauty and the aesthetic experience. 
Classical theories of beauty will be considered. Consideration will also be 
given to the relation of art to other human interests. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400, American Philosophical and Religious Thought. 

A historical survey of the development of philosophy in America. The 
thought of selected individuals who have been outstanding in this develop- 
ment will be studied. In some instances attention will be given to a 
European background, especially with regard to the establishment of poli- 
tical institutions. Along with this survey of philosophy, consideration will 
be given to the development of religious ideas. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

RELIGION 

251. The Prophets. 

A study of the development of religious ideas in the Old Testament. 
Some historical background is given but the chief treatment is with the 
message of the Prophets. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

252. The Letters of Paul. 

A study of some of what Paul said in his writings; the order of his 
writings; the conditions under which his letters were written; to whom they 
were written. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

261. Christian Ethics. 

Attention is given to an evaluation of human conduct from a particular- 
ly Christian point of view. Effort is made to understand what Christian 
teaching is with regard to moral problems and to relate this teaching to 
other points of view as well as to contemporary personal and social issues. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

262. Comparative Religion. 

A study is made of some of the major religions of the world. Attention 
is given to their background, practices and teaching. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



66 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

PHYSICS AND MATHEMATICS 

Professor McMillan; Associate Professors Guitart, 

Hernandez; Assistant Professors Blackmon, Cardone, 

Shirley; Instructors Baker, Suttle. 

For a major in mathematics see outline of curriculum on page 93. A minor 
in mathematics should include the following courses: Mathematics *160 or 140 
and 150, 261, 262, plus electives selected from the remaining mathematics of- 
ferings to complete the required eighteen hours. A major in mathematics should 
include the courses specified above plus Mathematics 370 and a sufficient num- 
ber of electives to complete at least twenty seven hours of mathematics. Mathe- 
matics majors should include Physics 201, 202, or Physics 241, 242 in their cur- 
riculum. Students who plan to teach mathematics in the secondary school are 
urged to take Mathematics 360 if they do not have a satisfactory knowledge of 
geometry. 

130. Introductory College Mathematics. Staff 

A first course in college mathematics for students who do not have a 
satisfactory knowledge of secondary school mathematics. Unless exempted by 
special examination, this course is prerequisite for all other courses in the 
department. Topics include elementary properties of triangles, quadrilaterals 
and circles, the arithmetic of real numbers, exponents and logarithms, the 
algebra of polynomials, rational expressions, powers of algebraic expres- 
sions, linear and quadratic equations. Five class periods per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
140. College Algebra. Staff 

Topics in algebra including quadratics, the binomial theorem, progres- 
sions, ratio and proportion, variations, determinants, probability, inequali- 
ties, and mathematical induction. Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 130 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
150. Plane Trigonometry. Staff 

A study of the functions of an angle, the solution of right and oblique 
triangles, radian measure, trigonometric equations, and graphs of functions. 
Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 140 or its equiva- 
lent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
160. College Algebra and Trigonometry. Staff 

A unified course in the materials of college algebra and trigonometry. 
Emphasis is placed on the unification of the concepts of function and cor- 
respondence between geometrical and numerical relations. Five class periods 
per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 130 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 5 hours. 
200. Fundamentals of Mathematics. Staff 

A course for both mathematics and science majors and students major- 
ing in other areas. Topics include number systems, inequalities, and the 
basic ideas of coordinate systems. Three class periods per week. Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 130 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
251. Statistics. Staff 

A first course in statistical methods dealing with such topics as meas- 
ures of central tendency, graphic representations, simple work with fre- 
quency distributions, use of tables of normal distribution in simple prob- 
lems, and practical applications. Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 130 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



♦Unless exempted by examination, students will be expected to take Math 160 (or 
Math 140, 150). 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

261, 262. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. Staff 

A unified course in the material of analytic geometry and calculus. 
Topics include plane curves, functions and limits, derivatives, differentials, 
indefinite integrals, definite integrals, conies, transcendental functions, po- 
lar coordinates, parametric equations, curvature, and methods of integra- 
tion. Five class periods per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 160 or its 
equivalent. 

Credit, 5 hours each semester. 
360. College Geometry. Hernandez 

An introduction to the ideas and methods of geometry needed for ad- 
vanced study and for teaching plane geometry. Topics in Euclidean and 
non-Euclidean geometry. Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 130 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
370. Intermediate Calculus. Guitart 

A further study of calculus including applications of definite integrals, 
approximate integration, improper integrals, indeterminate forms, series 
partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. Three class periods per week. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 262 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
380. Vector Analysis. McMillan 

A study of vector analysis including the algebra of vectors, differentia- 
tion of vectors, scalar and vector fields, vector operators, the gradient, di- 
vergence, and curl of a vector, vector integration, line, surface, and volume 
integrals, vector relations in various coordinate systems, Stokes' Theorem, 
Divergence Theorem, Green's Theorem, and applications. Three class periods 
per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 370 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
441, 442. Mathematics for the Sciences. McMillan 

A course designed to aid the student in outlining a logical method of 
attack in the solution of problems in the sciences. Stress will be placed on 
the scientific, physical, and mathematical concepts involved in problem 
solving. Prerequisite: Mathematics 150 or its equivalent. Three class periods 
per week. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
450. Introduction to Modern Algebra. Staff 

A study of elementary number theory, solutions of equations of higher 
degree, determinants, matrices, linear systems, polynomials, groups, rings, 
and fields. Three class periods per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 262 or 
its equivalent. Credit, 3 hoUTS. 

452. Differential Equations. Guitart 

A study of the solutions of ordinary differential equations with special 
attention given to applications in geometry and physics. Three class periods 
per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 370 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
460. Advanced Calculus. Staff 

A study of some of the more advanced topics of the calculus such as 
functions, sequences, limits, continuity, functions of several variables, arcs 
and curves, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, series, uniform conver- 
gence and limits, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: Mathematics 370 



or its equivalent. 



Credit, 3 hours. 



470. Complex Variables. Staff 

An introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable in- 
cluding: complex numbers, differentiation, elementary functions, mappings, 
integration, series expansions, the theory of residues and applications. Three 
class periods per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 370 or its equivalent. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



68 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

480. Topology. Cardone 

A course in the ordinary topology designed for mathematics majors and 
minors. Among the general topics studied are included the theory of sets, 
metric spaces, topological spaces, connectedness and compactness. Three class 
periods: per week. Admission by consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

PHYSICS 

100. Introductory Physics. Blackmon, Suttle 

An introductory course dealing with the basic laws and principles of 
mechanics, heat, sound, and electricity, and some of their practical appli- 
cations. The phenomological development of the science is emphasized with 
a minimum of mathematical analysis. This course, together with Chemistry 
100, satisfies the physical science requirement for non-science students. Two 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
201, 202. College Physics. McMillan, Blackmon 

A course in general physics covering mechanics, heat, sound, light, 
electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. Primarily for science ma- 
jors and pre-medical and pre-dental students. Three lectures and one two- 
hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 150 or its equiva- 
lent. 

Credit, 4 hours each semester. 
241, 242. Technical Physics. McMillan 

This course permits a more rigorous study of the topics found in COL- 
LEGE PHYSICS. Emphasis is placed on mathematical analyses and the 
solution of problems related to physics and engineering. Primarily for phy- 
sics and mathematics majors and basic engineering students. Four lectures 
and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
262 (or concurrently). 

Credit, 5 hours each semester. 
300. Intermediate Mechanics. McMillan 

An intermediate physics course devoted to a rigorous study of the 
statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. A knowledge of intro- 
ductory mechanics and the use of vectors will be assumed. Emphasis will 
be placed on the general analysis of problems and the use of dimensions. 
Three class periods per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
320. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism, McMillan 

An intermediate physics course devoted to a rigorous study of direct 
and alternating current circuits and networks, and electro-magnetic theory; 
and the electronic nature of matter. Three lectures and one three-hour lab- 
oratory period per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 370. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
340. Electronics. McMillan 

An introductory course in electronics including a study of thermionic 
emission, the behavior of vacuum tubes and their circuits. A knowledge 
of introductory electricity and the use of electrical measuring instruments 
are assumed. Three lecture periods and one three-hour laboratory period 
per week. Prerequisite: Mathematics 262. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
BASIC ENGINEERING 
150. Engineering Problems. Suttle 

A course designed to train the student in logical analysis and orderly 
procedures in the solutions of problems. The slide rule, logarithms, graphs, 
and tables are used to solve elementary problems in engineering and physics. 
Two class periods per week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 






DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

161, 162. Engineering Drawing. Suttle 

This course deals with the care and use of drawing instruments, instru- 
ment exercises, lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projections, 
drawing to scale, detail and assembly drawing, tracing and reading blue 
prints. Two three-hour periods per week. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
170. Descriptive Geometry. Suttle 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of points, lines 
and planes; single-curved surfaces, tangent lines and planes; intersection of 
surfaces; and surface developments. Two three-hour periods per week. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

211. Statics. McMillan, Suttle 

A course in applied mechanics including a study of composition and 
resolution of forces, force systems and torques, equilibrium of particles 
and rigid bodies, free-body diagrams. Problems involving friction, 
centroids, moments of inertia. Prerequisite: Physics 241. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

212. Dynamics. McMillan, Suttle 

A course in applied mechanics including a study of kinematics and the 
kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Problems involving the use of New- 
ton's Laws of motion, work-energy, and impulse-momentum relationships. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 211. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Vickery, McGurk; Associate Professor Broxton. 

For a major in psychology see outlines of curricula on pages 99 and 100. 

Students with a minor in this department will take Psychology 201-202, or its 
equivalent, Psychology 301-302, and choose the remainder of the eighteen hours 
under the guidance of the staff. Those preparing to teach are required to have 
a minor of twenty-four hours. 

201, 202. General Psychology. Staff 

The first semester deals with psychology as a science; its methods of 
study; the physical, neural and biological background necessary to the study 
and interpretation of human behavior; the motivation of behavior; indi- 
vidual and group differences and how they are determined. The second se- 
mester is concerned with personality development, learning processes, think- 
ing, memory, problems in attending and perceiving; application of psychol- 
ogy to everyday living experiences. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
300. Educational Psychology. 

This course includes a study of the general process of growth, problems 
of health, interests and incentives, social psychology of childhood and early 
adolescence, problems of emotional stress and discipline, the individual child, 
the development of intellectual efficiency and learning. For students pre- 
paring to teach in elementary grades. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
301-302. Experimental Psychology. Vickery 

A study of laboratory techniques and methods with emphasis on the 
sensory processes and motor phenomena, for the first semester; and on 
problems of memory, learning, perception, and thought during the second 
semester. The principles of elementary statistics necessary to the compila- 
tion and interpretation of data are included in this course. Prerequisite: 
General Psychology. 

Credit, 4 hours. 



70 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

330. Educational Psychology. 

This course deals with the areas of psychology directly related to ele- 
mentary and high school teaching; growth and development, theories of 
learning, economy in learning; motivation of behavior; growth and develop- 
ment of intelligence; emotional problems affecting the learning process; 
measurement of ability, achievement and aptitudes. Prerequisite: General 
Psychology. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. Applied Psychology. Broxton 

The psychology of dealing with people. An understanding of the indi- 
vidual's fundamental wants. A consideration of the factors upon which the 
quality of human adjustments depend. Psychology as applied to the pro- 
fessions of teaching, law, medicine, art; the parent-child relationship, the 
employer-employee relationship. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
350. Adolescent Psychology. 

Genetic background, survey of child development with emphasis on the 
pre-adolescent and adolescent periods, problems of social and educational 
adjustments, vocational guidance and mental hygiene as related to the 
adolescent boy and girl. Recommended for students who expect to become 
scout leaders, to conduct social activities in high school, to act as advisers 
to high school students, or to teach in high school. Prerequisite: General 
Psychology. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
360. General Testing. Broxton 

A survey of tests in common use, including performance tests, group 
tests of achievement, intelligence, personality, vocational interests, mechani- 
cal and motor tests, measurement of attitudes, interpretation of norms and 
scores. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
370. Intelligence Testing. Broxton 

Demonstration and practice in using the Revised Stanford-Binet tests; 
general clinical practices; interpretation of scores; handling of cases; form 
of report of clinical examinations and recommendations. Prerequisite: Gen- 
eral Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
380. Child Psychology. 

This course applies the general psychological principles to the growth 
and development of the young child. Emphasis is placed on the following 
topics: the significance of infancy and early childhood; origins of child be- 
havior; development of mental functions; emotional behavior; motivation 
during childhood; social development of young children; prediction, guid- 
ance and control of child behavior. Observation in nursery school, kinder- 
garten or elementary school is required. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
410. Abnormal Psychology. Vickery 

Types of personaltiy and their relation to abnormalities; amnesias; 
sleep; dreams; hypnosis; hallucinations; multiple personalities; neuroses and 
psychoses; principles of mental hygiene. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
420. Social Psychology. Broxton 

A psychological study of the individual in the social situation. Empha- 
sis is upon the development of attitudes, group thinking, sources of con- 
flict, effects of competition and cooperation, analysis and evaluation of 
propaganda techniques and other forces which affect individuals in groups. 
The group discussion method is used. Prerequisite: General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 






DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

430. Mental Hygiene. Vickery 

Problems of mental health with emphasis on the period of childhood 
and adolescence, conditioning and inhibition, sleep, fatigue, and psycho- 
neuroses, symptoms and treatment of social maladjustments. Prerequisite: 
General Psychology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

441. Counseling and Interviewing. Vickery 

Practice and theories underlying present day methods in psychological 
counseling and interviewing, especially in relation to children with person- 
ality difficulties. Some attention will also be given to vocational counseling 
and the adjustment of exceptional children into the school program. Prere- 
quisite: Consent of instructor. 

Credit, 2 hours. 

442. Practicum in Testing. Vickery 

Supervised experience in diagnostic evaluation, with particular empha- 
sis on problems usually found in children's school adjustment. Considerable 
contact with exceptional children and evaluation of their actual difficulties 
will be required. Prerequisite: Psychology 360 and 370, or consent of in- 
structor. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
451. Psychology of the Mentally Retarded Child. Vickery 

This course deals with children who cannot compete successfully with 
other children of their age; the possible causes involved; the measurement 
of the degree of their retardation; types of mentally retarded children; 
probable prognosis and treatment in school situations. Prerequisites: Psy- 
chology 380 or equivalent and consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
460. Statistics in the Social Sciences. Broxton 

Obtaining statistical data, tabulations, frequency distributions; appli- 
cation of statistical measures of central tendency, variability, reliability 
and correlation. Compilation and interpretation of norms. Forms of stan- 
dard scores, comparison of data, graphs. 

Credit, 2 hours. 
470. Psychology of Personality. Broxton 

This course includes a study of the psychological organization of adult 
personality with emphasis upon individuality rather than upon generalized 
human nature. A study of the organic basis of personality, factors involved 
in the development of integrated personality, and personality variables and 
their measurement are included in the course. Prerequisite: General Psy- 
chology. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Professors Thomas, Griffith; Associate Professors Flynn, 

Whatley; Assistant Professors Gorgey, Jackson, J., 

Jackson, S., Newton, Niven, Triplett. 

The following majors are possible in the social science division: Economics, 
History, Political Science, Social Sciences, and Sociology. 

Students may minor in the following fields: Economics, History, Political 
Science, Social Sciences, and Sociology. 

ECONOMICS 

A major in Economics shall consist of: (1) Economics 201-202; (2) electives 
totaling twenty-one hours in economics. Economics 250 is not open to majors or 
minors. 

A minor in Economics shall consist of: (1) Economics 201-202; (2) twelve 
hours elected from Economics courses. 



72 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

201-202. Economic Principles and Problems. Flynn 

A course outlined to fit the needs of students who wish to major or 
minor in the social sciences. Particular stress is placed upon the under- 
standing of basic economic principles, structure, and functioning and their 
application to economic problem areas. Particular emphasis is placed upon 
the impact of the machine upon American economic life, industrial and agri- 
cultural trends, oligopoly, the business cycle, international trade, and the 
increased participation of government in the distribution process. This course 
is basic for majors in Business Administration, Retail Economics, and 
other social sciences. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
250. General Principles of Economics. Flynn 

A condensed introductory course designed to assist laymen in under- 
standing the structure and functioning of our economic system. Particular 
emphasis is placed upon economic principles, problems, and alternative 
policies. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
320. Economic Development of the United States. Flynn 

A study tracing the economic development of the United States from a 
simple, largely self sufficient, agrarian society to a place of world leader- 
ship in industry, trade, and finance. A non-technical course open to all stu- 
dents, with consent of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
330. Economic Fluctuations. Flynn 

A study of periodic fluctuations in economic activity, their types, na- 
ture, theories as to causes, and consequences, and an analysis of proposed 
methods for controlling inflation and/or depressions. Prerequisite: Economics 
201-202. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. Economic Geography. 

(See Geography 340.) 

Credit, 3 hours. 
351. Public Finance. Staff 

A basic course of the principles of taxation, tax practices, public ex- 
penditure and public borrowing for all levels of American government. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
360. Intermediate Economic Analysis. 

This course is an advanced examination of the economic principles un- 
derlying value and distribution. Attention is also given to the application of 
these principles to problems of analysis. Because of its intensive, advanced 
approach, the course is open only to juniors and seniors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
370. Labor Problems. 

A brief background treatment of the European labor movement with 
the major emphasis centered upon a survey of the American labor scene, 
including wages, unemployment, labor legislation, union organizations and 
agencies of industrial peace. The labor problems of the South receive particu- 
lar attention. Prerequisite: Economics 201-202 or consent of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400. Development of Economic Thought. Flynn 

This course traces the development of economic theory giving special 
emphasis to the emergent schools of economic thought. The ideas and the 
writings of such men as Smith, Hicardo, Marx, Jevons, Marshall, Clark, 
Veblen, Mitchell, Schumpeter, Keynes and Galbraith will be studied. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 73 

430. Money and Banking. 

A basic course of the principles of money and banking including the 
creation, expansion, and contraction of money. Also an introduction to 
commercial banking and the Federal Reserve System. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
440. Comparative Economic Systems. Flynn 

A study of capitalism, socialism, and communism both in theory 
and in deviations from theory as these economic systems have been put 
into practice in the United States, Britain, and the Soviet Union. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
GEOGRAPHY 
331. Elements of Geography. Jackson 

A study of the elements of geography, including climates, land forms, 
biotic resources, soil types and minerals. Required of students studying for 
a Bachelor's degree with training in elementary education. Elective for all 
others. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. Economic Geography. Jackson 

A study of the influence of geography on the commercial and economic 
development of the important nations of the world. Open to juniors and 
seniors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
432. Geography of North America. Jackson 

A study of the regional geography of North America with emphasis on 
land use as related to human activity. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
HISTORY 

A major in History shall consist of: (1) History 101-102; History 211-212; 

(2) two consecutive courses in European History; (3) twelve hours credit in elective 
courses in History; (4) six hours in elective courses in Economics, Political Sci- 
ence, Geography, or Sociology. 

A minor in History shall consist of: (1) History 101-102; (2) History 211-212; 

(3) six hours credit in elective courses in History, three of which must be Euro- 
pean History; (4) three hours credit in elective courses in Economics, Political 
Science, Geography, or Sociology. 

101-102. History of Civilization. Staff 

A survey of social, cultural, political, economic, and religious develop- 
ment from the earliest civilization to the present. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
210. History of the United States. Staff 

A condensed survey course in the history of the United States espe- 
cially provided for basic engineering students. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
211-212. History of the United States. Griffith 

A survey of the history of the United States from colonial times to the 
present. Required of history majors and minors. Prerequisite: History 101- 
102. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
351. Medieval European History. 

Beginning with the fall of the Roman Empire in the West, 476 A.D. 
this course traces the narrative of events and the development of social, 
economic, and religious institutions to the period of the Reformation. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



74 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

352. Modern European History. 

This course is a continuation of History 351. It develops the period 
referred to as the Renaissance, and proceeds to the Protestant Revolution, 
and subsequent wars. The later period, including the French Revolution and 
the Napoleonic era, is covered. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

361. History of Europe from 1814 to 1914. 

This course traces the development of nationalities in Europe following 
the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, the growth of democracy in 
government, and the political and economic progress of the nations of 
Western Europe and the Balkans. A background for the First World War 
is provided. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

362. History of Europe from 1914 to 
World War II. 

An effort is made to present the course of events during World War I, 
and more particularly the problems growing out of the war, attempts at 
settlement, and failure. As much time as possible will be given to a study 
of the impact of these events on other areas of the world. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

370. The Frontier in American History. Griffith 

This course traces the westward expansion of the United States from 
the Atlantic seaboard to the Pacific. Attention is given to the history and 
frontier upon American ideals and institutions. Prerequisite: History 211-212, 
or History 210, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

371, 372. History of Latin America. 

It is the purpose of this course to acquaint the students with the 
growth and development of the various Latin American republics. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 
391. Diplomatic History of the United States. 

This course deals with the foundations of American diplomacy and with 
America's expanding role in international affairs. Prerequisite: History 211- 
212, or History 210, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400. History of Russia. 

A history of the Russian people from their origins up to the present, 
with specific emphasis on the period from the Communist Revolution of 1917. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
441, 442. History of England. 

A survey of English history from the beginning to the present. Special 
stress will be laid on legal and constitutional developments, economic growth, 
and cultural contributions. During the second semester, the political and 
economic interests overseas will be traced and recent political and economic 
trends analyzed. 

Credit, 3 hours each semester. 

451. History of the Near East. 

A study of the political, economic, and cultural history of the Near 
East with special emphasis on the period from the Ottoman Empire to 
the present. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

452. History of the Far East. 

A study of political, economic, and cultural history in the Far East, with 
emphasis upon the role of China, India, and Japan in the modern world. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 75 

470. American Colonial History. Griffith 

This course deals with the European background of American coloni- 
zation, the development of the colonies politically, socially and economic- 
ally, and the factors underlying the American Revolution. Offered alternate 
years. Prerequisite: History 211-212 or History 210, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
472. History of Alabama. Griffith 

A survey course. Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: History 
211-212, or History 210, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

481. Recent History of the United States. Griffith 

A survey of the history of the United States since 1898 with special 
emphasis on the social and economic problems of the period. Open to all 
students in the junior and senior years. Prerequisite: History 211-212, or 
History 210, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

482. History of the South. Griffith 

A course tracing the economic, social and political developments of the 
South from colonial times, with special emphasis on the period from 1830 
to 1876, and its influence on the nation. Open to students with a major 
in history in the junior and senior years and to other students who have 
the approval of the chairman of the department. Offered alternate years. 
Prerequisite: History 211-212, or History 210, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
490. Directed Reading and Independent Study. 

This is a course involving the investigation of assigned subjects and 
utilizing the techniques of supervised reading and independent study. It 
is open to advanced students, with the consent of the instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

A major in Political Science shall consist of (1) Political Science 200 and 
251; (2) eighteen hours in Political Science electives; (3) six hours elective credit 
in Economics, Geography, History, or Sociology. 

A minor in Political Science shall consist of (1) Political Science 200 and 
251; (2) twelve hours elective credit in Political Science. 

200. American Government. Thomas 

The object of this course is to acquaint the student with the origins, 
constitutional background, and development of our national government. The 
machinery and practical working of the government is stressed, and the 
problems of government both national and local are considered. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
251. State Government. Thomas 

A study of the forms of government as they exist in the different states 
of the United States, with particular inquiry as to the place of the states 
with reference to both national and local governments. Problems posed by 
the growing complexities of the present period are considered with emphasis 
on the states of the individuals in the course. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
310. Principles of Public Administration. Thomas 

A study of administrative structure and organization, together with a 
study of methods of control. Prerequisite: Political Science 200 or 251. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



320. Political Theory. Thomas 

k. study of politica 

Credit, 3 hours 



Introduction of the study of political philosophy. A study of political 
ideas from ancient times to the present. 



76 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

330. Political Parties. Thomas 

Introduction to the study of politics, elections, and public opinion. 
Covers the organization, operations, and role of American political parties 
and the administration of elections in the United States. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. International Organization. Gorgey 

A course dealing specifically with the mechanics of international organi- 
zation. Attention is given to the organization and role of the United Na- 
tions and reference is made to its predecessor, the League of Nations. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400. Constitutional Law. Thomas 

This course is designed to be an introduction to the study of the prin- 
ciples of constitutional law. Attention is given to the interpretation of the 
law by the courts, and the effects on our system of government, both state 
and national. Cases are studied. Prerequisite: Political Science 200. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
410. Comparative Government. Gorgey 

A study of the government of major foreign nations. Attention is given 
to the distinctive features of their political system and social institutions. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
420. Government and Politics of the Soviet Union. Gorgey 

A survey of Russian internal developments from about 1900 to the 
present, including an analysis of Marxism and Leninism and emphasizing 
the organization and functioning of the Soviet government, the Communist 
party, and trends in Soviet policy. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
492. International Relations. Gorgey 

A course in the mechanics of international organization and world poli- 
tics. The foreign policies of the major powers are studied with special em- 
phasis on the United States and the Soviet Union. The role of the United 
Nations in the contemporary world is discussed. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

A student may have a composite major in the social sciences by completing 
thirty hours for a major within the Department of the Social Sciences with at least 
eighteen hours in one subject matter field. At least eighteen hours of this work 
must be at the junior and senior level. Students desiring teaching certificates must 
take History 101-102 and six hours of American History as a part of this major. 

Students are permitted to elect a minor in the social sciences only if a major 
is taken in one of the related subject matter fields or advance approval is secured 
from the Chairman of the Department. For such a minor twenty-four hours will be 
required, at least twelve hours of which must be in junior and senior courses. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Majors in sociology should take Sociology 231-232, 331, 342, and fifteen addi- 
tional hours selected in conference with the Chairman of the Social Science De- 
partment. These majors will be expected to include at least one year of political 
science, preferably 200 and 251. 

Majors in sociology planning to enter the social work field should see outline 
of curriculum on page 101. 

Students who wish to take a minor in general sociology will be expected to 
take ^Sociology 231-232 and at least twelve additional hours approved by the Chair- 
man of the Social Science Department. Those desiring a minor in sociology with pre- 
professional training in social work should take Sociology 121, 122, and at least 
twelve additional hours approved by the Chairman of the Department. 






DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

121, 122. The Field of Social Service. Niven 

A broad introductory course for those going into social work as well 
as for teachers, ministers, lawyers, nurses, and religious workers interested 
in the philosophy and principles of the social services. Emphasis is on the 
organization, aims, scope, and methods of treatment provided by social 
agencies. Field trips are made to private and public social agencies. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 
231-232. Introductory Sociology. Newton 

An introduction to the study of society. The course considers various 
sociological concepts and phenomena, such as group behavior, the culture 
patterns of primitive and modern society and the trends and problems in 
world population. The influence of science and technology on society, the 
nature of social institutions and the problems of social change and inter- 
action will be discussed. 

Credit, 6 hours. 
331. Marriage and the Family. Whatley 

A study of the modern American family, its problems and functions. 
This is followed by a study of the practical problems of courtship and 
marriage with emphasis upon the importance of personal relationships in 
marital adjustment. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

341. Problems of Juvenile Delinquency. Whatley 

A study of causative factors involved in socially approved and anti- 
social behavior of juvenile offenders. The emphasis is on prevention of 
juvenile delinquency, modern methods of treatment, institutional care, juve- 
nile court and detention home organization and operation. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

342. The Southern Region. Whatley 

Treatment of urban and rural aspects of the South, emphasizing the 
natural and human resources in order to develop an appreciation and un- 
derstanding of the culture of the region. Particular attention is given to 
causal factors in recent economic, social, and political changes in the region. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
362. Introduction to Public Welfare. Whatley 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the history, organiza- 
tion, and functions of public welfare, and including information about so- 
cial security and the laws governing public assistance administration at 
both state and federal levels. Open to all students in the junior and senior 
years. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
All. Elements of Social Work. Niven 

This course is designed as a comprehensive study of certain modern so- 
cial problems and of the several methods used by agencies and institutions 
rendering social services in relation to these problems. An attempt is made to 
correlate the content of this course with that of related disciplines in the so- 
cial sciences. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
461. The Community. Whatley 

A study of the community centering around resources available and 
needed for social services. Emphasis on trends in community planning and 
the relation of such groups as teachers, social workers, and lay persons 
to community life. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



78 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

462. Social Problems of Child Welfare. Whatley 

A course dealing with the special needs of dependent, neglected, and 
delinquent children with emphasis on the types of agencies which have been 
established to deal with child welfare problems. Open to juniors and seniors 
with consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

471, 472. Introduction to Field Work. Niven 

A special work unit is maintained by Alabama College in cooperation 
with the Shelby County Welfare Department in which students work under 
faculty-agency supervision in rendering services to selected cases. Driver's 
license required. Two semesters. 

Credit, 2 hours each semester. 

SPEECH 

Professor Wright; Associate Professors Chichester, Roe, 

Trumbauer; Assistant Professor Harbour; 

Instructor Graham. 

For a major in speech see outlines on pages 102 and 103. 

A minor requires 18 hours in speech selected with the approval of the Chair- 
man of the Department. 

The following courses may be used in fulfillment of the speech option for 
general education requirements: 120, 140, 150, 230, and 240. 

BASES OF SPEECH 

240. Voice and Diction. Staff 

Training for improvement in use of the speaking voice. Attention fo- 
cused on range, flexibility, clarity of articulation, standards of pronuncia- 
tion. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 
320. Psychology of Speech. Wright 

A consideration of the psychological aspects of verbal behavior as a 
means of communication. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
340. Introduction to Phonetics. Staff 

Study of the International Phonetic Alphabet as applied to American 
speech. Required of speech correction majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
440. Speech for the Classroom Teacher. 

Roe, Trumbauer, Wright 

Personal speech training for the teacher, and methods of improving 
and developing the speech of the student in the classroom. Class lectures, 
collateral readings, and talks and readings by members of the class. Spe- 
cial attention to developmental patterns of speech and language. Prerequisite: 
Speech 140 or 150 or 240 or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

472. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech. Wright 

A study of the anatomy, physiology, and physics of voice production 
with a survey of experimental work. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

RHETORIC AND PUBLIC ADDRESS 

140. Introductory Principles of Public Speaking. Staff 

Special emphasis upon subject matter, purpose) audience, occasion, and 
types of speeches. Three hours required of speech majors. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 79 

230. Group Discussion. Graham 

A study of the foundations of discussion and debate as methods of 
dealing with public questions. Participation in classroom discussion and de- 
bate is included. Prerequisite: Speech 140 or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

231, 232; 331, 332; 431, 432. Debate Squad. Graham 

Preparation of individual cases on the current debate proposition plus 
participation in inter-squad and intercollegiate debates. Students electing this 
course are expected to represent the College in off-campus forensic con- 
tests. Open to all students. Prerequisite if credit desired: Speech 230 or 
consent of the instructor. 

Credit, 1 hour each. 
452. Advanced Public Speaking. Graham 

A survey of the history and theory of public address with a study of 
speech composition and platform techniques for the public speaking situation. 
Prerequisite: Speech 140 or consent of instructor. 



Credit, 3 hours. 



SPEECH CORRECTION 



371. Introduction to Speech Correction. Roe, Wright 

An introductory consideration of the disorders of speech, of develop- 
mental norms of speech and language, and deviations therefrom. The course 
is designed to meet the needs of the public school teacher, social worker, 
and personnel worker, as well as those of the beginning speech correctionist. 
Required of speech correction majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

372. Speech Pathology. Roe, Wright 

An intermediate study of the disorders of speech. Required of speech 
correction majors. Prerequisite: Speech 371. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
381. Stuttering: Theories and Therapies. Roe, Wright 

An investigation of research in areas indicated. Prerequisite: Speech 371. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
410. Introduction to Audiology. Roe, Wright 

Introduction to audiology and overview of the discipline of audiology 
with an introductory investigation of the physics of sound, anatomy and 
physiology of the hearing mechanism, theories of hearing, and selected 
audiometric techniques. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
All. Hearing Rehabilitation. Roe, Wright 

A study of the principles and techniques of rehabilitation of hard of 
hearing children and adults. The course includes auditory training, speech 
reading, and hearing conservation. Required of speech correction majors. 
Prerequisites: Speech 371, 372, 410. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
481. Advanced Speech Pathology. Roe, Wright 

An advanced study of speech disorders with special consideration of 
the problems of differential diagnosis. Prerequisite: Speech 371, 372. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
SPEECH EDUCATION 
359. The Teaching of Speech in High School. Wright 

Discussion and evaluation of methods for teaching speech in hig^h school, 
units of work on the various phases including lesson plans. 

Credit, 2 hours. 



80 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

369. The Teaching of Speech in Elementary and 

High School. Wright 

Credit, 4 hours. 

389. Speech Correction Methods. Roe, Wright 

A professional course in the methods of diagnosis, therapy, and related 
counseling in the area of speech rehabilitation for elementary, secondary, 
and adult levels. Required of speech correction majors. Prerequisite: Speech 
371 and 372. Listed under Education also. 

Credit, 4 hours. 
469, 479. Clinical Practice. Roe, Wright 

Employment of diagnostic procedures, carrying out speech therapy, con- 
ferences with supervisor, preparing records. Provision is made for experi- 
ence with children of school age and adults in a wide range of speech 
therapy. This experience centers chiefly in the public school. (469 with 
elementary grade children; 479 with high school students and adults.) 
Two hundred clock hours are required as a minimum standard for certifi- 
cation by the American Speech and Hearing Association. Prerequisite: 
Speech 371 and 372. 

Credit, 2 to 6 hours. 
INTERPRETATION 

150. Introduction to Oral Interpretation. 

Trumbauer 

Development of adequate responsiveness to the meaning of literature, 
and of the power to read orally in order to communicate this appreciation 
to others. Open to all students. Required of all speech majors. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
251, 252. Oral Interpretation of Literature. Harbour 

A study of the creative aspects of oral interpretation, character studies, 
adaptations. Program building; study of interpretation of selected prose and 
poetry. 

Credit, 2 or 3 hours each semester. 
THEATRE 

120. Introduction to Theatre. Harbour 

Introductory survey of drama and the art and craft of theatre. Required 
of general speech majors. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period 
per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

351. Creative Dramatics. Trumbauer 

Discussion and application of techniques of story telling and creative 
dramatics with special attention to meeting needs of various age levels. 
Open to juniors and seniors or with consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

352. Theatre and Drama History. Chichester 

A survey of the history of the theatre and the development of the drama 
of our western civilization from the fifth century, B.C., in Greece to the 
present. Prerequisite: Speech 120, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
400. The Theatre Workshop. Staff 

The theatre workshop is planned to cover any phase of theatre art, such 
as acting, playwriting, designing, staging, lighting, costuming, make-up, 
history, research, or any combination of these. Participation in such activi- 
ties does not insure credit until satisfactory completion of such work as 
shall merit credit at the discretion of the director of the activities. 

Credit, 1-3 hours. 



DEPARTMENTS AND COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 81 

450. Stage Scenery and Lighting. Chichester 

A study of principles, techniques, and materials involved in construction, 
scene painting and stage lighting. Prerequisite: Speech 120 or consent of in- 
structor. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
460. Stage Design. Chichester 

Theory and practice in designing for the stage. Problems in scenic design 
involving the sketch, model and working drawing. Prerequisite: Speech 450 
or consent of instructor. One lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods 
per week. 

Credit, 3 hours. 
470. Play Directing. Chichester 

The principles of play directing including techniques for solving problems 
in selecting, casting, rehearsal and performance. Prerequisites: Speech 120, 
450, 460, or consent of instructor. 

Credit, 3 hours. 

160. Orientation in Field of Radio and 

Television. Chichester 

A general background course covering technical fundamentals of broad- 
casting, history of industry, program types and standards, systems of 
broadcasting, station organization, listener demands, opportunities, etc. If 
elected by general speech majors, elect in sophomore year. 

Credit, 3 hours. 



82 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

LIBERAL ARTS 

OR 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Advisers 

English Professor Lott 

French, German, Spanish Professor Elliott 

History, Economics, Political Science, Sociology, 

Social Science Professor Thomas 

Music Professor Stewart 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Foreign Language 101 4 Foreign Language 102 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Science or Mathematics* 3 Science or Mathematics* 3 

Art, Music, or Speech 3 Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 Foreign Language 202 3 

Science or Mathematics* 3 Science or Mathematics* 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Psychology or Philosophy 3 Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Major Subject 3 Major Subject 3 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Electives** 10 Electives** 10 

16 16 

SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Major Subject 3 Major Subject 3 

Electives 13 Electives 13 

16 16 

*Six hours from each of two fields to be chosen from the following: Bi- 
ology 101-102; Mathematics 130, 140 or 140, 150; Chemistry 100 and Physics 
100 or Geology 110 or Chemistry 121-122. 

Secondary Education. For a teaching certificate, six hours of biological and 
six hours of physical science are required, and in the sophomore year the six 
hours of social science elective must be in sociology, economics, political sci- 
ence, or geography. 

**For other requirements for the Class B Secondary Professional certificate, 
see page 46. 

The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 



83 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 
ART 

Associate Professor Turpin, Adviser 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Art 101 3 

English 101 3 

Foreign Language 101 4 

History 101 3 

Science or Mathematics* 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Art 102 3 

English 102 3 

Foreign Language 102 4 

History 102 3 

Science or Mathematics* 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Art 201 3 

English 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Science or Mathematics* 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 



Art 202 3 

English 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Science or Mathematics* 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Art 321 3 

Art Elective 3 

Minor Subject 3 

Psychology 201 or Philosophy 3 

Electives 4 



Second Semester 



Art 322 3 

Art Elective 3 

Minor Subject 3 

Music or Speech 3 

Electives 4 



16 



16 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Art Electives 6 

Minor Subject or Electives 3 

Electives 7 



16 



Second Semester 



Art Electives 6 

Minor Subject or Electives 3 

Electives 7 



16 



*Six hours from each of two fields to be chosen from the following: Bi- 
ology 101-102; Mathematics 130, 140 or 140, 150; Chemistry 100 and Physics 
100 or Geology 110 or Chemistry 121-122. For a teaching certificate, six hours 
of biological and six hours of physical science are required, and the six hours 
of social science elective in the sophomore year must be in a social science 
other than history. 

This curriculum presents the student the opportunity of concentrating in 
one of the following phases of art: painting, design, sculpture, graphics, art 
history, or art education. For education courses required for a Class B Elemen- 
tary-Secondary teaching certificate see page 46. 

The minor should be chosen with the approval of the Chairman of the 
Art Department. 



The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 



84 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
BIOLOGY 



Professor Turner, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Art 2 Speech 2 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15 15 
SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 240 4 Biology 200 3 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

English 3 English 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Elective 2 Elective 3 

17 17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 300 4 Biology 330 3 

Biology 380 or 390 3 Biology 360 or 370 3 

Physics 201 4 Physics 202 4 

Psychology 201 3 Electives* 7 

Electives* 2 

17 17 

SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 430 3 Biology Elective 3 

Electives 13 Electives 13 

16 16 

A minor may be taken in any department with the approval of the de- 
partmental chairman. 

Any student who anticipates the possibility of graduate study should take 
two years of a foreign language. French or German is preferred. 

♦Students wishing to qualify for a teaching certificate should see the re- 
quirements for the Class B Secondary Professional certificate on page 46. 

The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 

GENERAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

Designed primarily for those preparing to teach. For such a major, one 
must have a minimum of 12 hours in biology, 14 hours in chemistry, and 12 
hours in physics. Mathematics 140, 150 are required. For information concern- 
ing a minor see page 112. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 85 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

BIOLOGY 

FOR PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICAL TECHNICIANS 

Professor Turner, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Art 2 Speech 2 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15 15 
SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 240 4 Biology 200 3 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

English 3 English 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Electives 2 Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 300 4 Biology Elective 4 

Biology 380 or 390 3 Biology 330 3 

Physics 201 4 Physics 202 4 

Chemistry Elective 3 Chemistry Elective 3 

Psychology 201 3 Electives 3 

17 17 

SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 410 4 Biology 420 3 

Biology 430 3 Electives 13 

Electives 6 

Chemistry Elective 3 

16 16 



86 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Associate Professor Morgan, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101- 3 English 102 3 

History 101 •-.. 3 History 102 ^ „ 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

Sciencef 3 Science* 3 

Business Administration 100' 3 Art, Music, or Speech 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

Economics 201 3 Economics 202 3 

Business Administration 221 3 Business Administration 222 3 

Mathematics 25T or Mathematics 251 or 

science elective** 3 science elective** 3 

Psychology, Philosophy, or Business Administration 261 3 

Religion .' 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical' Education 1 

16 16 
JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Business Administration 370 3 Business Administration 362 3 

Business Administration 3 Business Administration 3 

Economics 360 3 Political Science 251 or 400 3 

Political Science 200 3 Electives 8 

Electives 5 

17 17 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Business Administration 3 Business Administration 480 3 

Electives 13 Business Administration 6 

Electives 7 

16 16 

The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 

*See page 113 for the requirements for the several degrees. One year's 
work (a minimum of six hours) in either the biological or the physical sci- 
ences is required. 

** Another mathematics course or a science elective may be substituted 
for Mathematics 251 with consent of counselor. See page 113. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 87 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Associate Professor Morgan, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Chemistry 100* 3 Physics 100* 3 

Mathematics 130 or 140 3 Business Administration 100 3 

Business Administration 112 3 Art, Music, or Speech** 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

Business Administration 201*** 3 Business Administration 202*** 3 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

Psychology 201 3 Economics 202 3 

Economics 201 3 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 Electives 3 

16 16 
JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester - 

Business Administration 221 3 Business Administration 222 3 

Business Administration 301 3 Minor Subject 3 

Business Administration 370 3 Electives 11 

Minor Subject 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Electives 2 

17 17 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Business Administration 400 3 Business Administration 3 

Business Administration Elective.... 3 Business Administration 3 

Electives 10 Electives 10 

16 16 



♦Chemistry 121-122 may be taken instead of Chemistry 100 and Physics 
100, and is recommended for those preparing to become medical secretaries. 

**For those students who have to take both B.A. Ill and 112, the Art, 
Music, or Speech would be postponed to the second semester of the sophomore 
year in lieu of the three-hour elective shown there. 

If a teaching certificate is desired upon graduation, see education require- 
ments for the Class B Secondary Professional Certificate listed on page 46, 

Students who minor in secretarial administration and who wish a teach- 
ing certificate must have a minimum of eight hours in shorthand and type- 
writing and six hours of accounting as part of the minor. 

***In order to earn credit for B.A. 201, a student must successfully com- 
plete B.A. 202. No student shall be permitted to receive a degree in Secre- 
tarial Administration unless at least one semester of shorthand has been taken. 



88 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
CHEMISTRY 



Professor Kennedy, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

Art, Music, Speech 3 Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 201 4 Chemistry 202 4 

Chemistry 210 3 English 242 3 

English 241 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Psychology, Philosophy, Religion .... 3 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 321 3 Chemistry 322 3 

Physics 201 4 Physics 202 4 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Electives 5 Electives 5 

15 15 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 401 3 Chemistry 402 3 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Electives 10 Electives 10 

16 16 

If a teaching certificate is desired upon graduation, see education require- 
ments for the Class B Secondary Professional Certificate listed on page 46. 
These education courses should be taken in the junior and senior years as 
part of the electives. Social science electives in the sophomore year must be in 
sociology, economics, geography, or political science. 

GENERAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

Designed primarily for those preparing to teach. For such a major, one 
must have a minimum of 12 hours in biology, 14 hours in chemistry, and 12 
hours in physics. Mathematics 140, 150 are required. For information concerning 
a minor see page 112. 

Students intending to go to graduate school should take foreign language. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 



39 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Associate Professor Dunn, Adviser 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



English 101 3 

History 101 3 

Chemistry 100 or Biology 101 3 

Art 101 2 or 3 

Mathematics 130, 140, or 200 .... 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 



English 102 3 

History 102 3 

Physics 100 or Biology 102 3 

Speech or Elective 3 

Health 110 or Electives 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



English 3 

History 211 3 

Biology 101 or Chemistry 100 3 

Electives 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 



English 3 

History 212 3 

Biology 102 or Physics 100 3 

Mathematics or Science or Elective ?> 

Physical Education 1 

Electives 3 



16 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Education 320 3 

Education 345 2 

Geography 331 3 

Social Science* 3 

Psychology 300 2 

English 310 3 

Elective 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Education 342 4 

Psychology 380 2 

Geography 432 3 

Social Science* 3 

Physical Education 320 3 

Electives or Art 341 2 



17 



First Semester 



SENIOR 



Education 430 4 

Education 440** 6 

Education 490** 2 

Speech 440*** 3 



15 



Second Semester 



School Music 400 4 

Education 422 or 481 2 

Art 341 or electives 2 

Electives 9 



17 



*To be selected from economics, political science, or sociology. 
** First nine weeks for entire day. 
***Second nine weeks. 

For the Bachelor of Arts Degree: Fourteen hours of a foreign language are 
required, and should be taken in the freshman and sophomore years, with 
fourteen hours listed above in those years deferred until later. A major of 
twenty-four hours should be earned in a field leading to the A.B. degree. Only 
twelve hours of science are required. 

For the Bachelor of Science Degree: Eighteen hours of science and/or 
mathematics are required for this degree, with the foreign language being 
optional. 

History 472 (Alabama History) is recommended for both degrees, and may 
be substituted for Geography 432. 

Upon graduation the student is qualified for the Class B Elementary Pro- 
fessional Certificate. 



90 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND RECREATION 

Professor Palmer, Adviser 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Biology 101 3 

English 101 3 

History 101 3 

Physical Education 191 2 

Health Education 110 2 

Art, Music, or Speech 3 

16 



Second Semester 



Biology 102 3 

English 102 3 

History 102 3 

Physical Education 192 3 

Electives 4 



16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Biology 240 4 

Chemistry 100 3 

English 3 

Social Science Elective* 3 

Physical Education 291 2 

Electives 2 



17 



Second Semester 



Psychology 201 3 

English 3 

Physics 100 3 

Social Science Elective* 3 

Physical Education 292 2 

Electives 3 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Physical Education 361 3 

Physical Education 370 3 

Physical Education 391 2 

Physical Education 381 3 

Education 320 3 

Electives 2 



16 



Second Semester 



Physical Education 362 3 

Physical Education 380 3 

Physical Education 392 2 

Physical Education 472 2 

Psychology 330 3 

Electives 3 



16 



SENIOR 

First Semester 

Education 317 2 Electives 

Physical Education 420 2 

Physical Education 482 2 

Electives 10 



Second Semester 



.16 



16 



16 



Minor should be chosen in consultation with departmental adviser. 

*To be chosen from economics, geography, political science, or sociology. 

If a teaching certificate is desired upon graduation, see education require- 
ments for the Class B Elementary-Secondary Professional certificate or the 
Class B Secondary Professional listed on page 46. 



The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 



91 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
HOME ECONOMICS 

Associate Professor Larkin, Adviser 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Art 101 2 

Chemistry 100* or Biology 101 3 

English 101 3 

History 101 3 

Home Economics 150 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 



Art 102 :. 2 

Physics 100* or Biology 102 3 

English 102 3 

History 102 3 

Home Economics 170 4 

Physical Education 1 



16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



Biology 101 or Chemistry 100 3 

English 3 

Home Economics 310 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Social Science Elective** 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 



Biology 102 or Physics 100 3 

English 3 

Home Economics 320 3 

Home Economics 200 2 

Home Economics 250 2 

Social Science Elective** 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 



VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Home Economics 350 3 

Home Economics 380 3 

Home Economics 390 3 

Home Economics 391 3 

Psychology Elective 3 

Electives 2 



17 



Second Semester 



Home Economics 370 3 

Home Economics 392 3 

Education 320 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Electives 4 



16 



SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Home Economics 490 6 Home Economics 402 3 

Home Economics 440 4 Electives 13 

Home Economcs 491 4 

Education 490 2 

16 16 



The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 

♦Chemistry 121-122 is required for students majoring in Institution Eco- 
nomics. 

Biology 340 required for students majoring in Institution Economics. 

**In the Vocational Education curriculum, the social science must be 
chosen from economics, geography, political science, or sociology. Retail Home 
Economics majors may select any of the Social Sciences other than Economics 
which is required in the junior year. 



92 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 
RETAIL ECONOMICS 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Economics 201 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Business Administration 100 3 

Home Economics 360 1 

Home Economics 391 3 

Home Economics Electives 4 



17 



Second Semester 



Economics 202 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Business Administration 3 

Home Economics Elective 3 

Electives 5 



17 



SENIOR 

First Semester 

Home Economics 451 3 Electives 

Home Economics 461 5 

Home Economics Elective 2 

Art 4 

14 



Second Semester 



.17 



17 



HOME ECONOMICS IN BUSINESS 

Appropriate courses in Business Administration and Home Economics may 
be substituted for Home Economics 451 and 461. 

INSTITUTION ECONOMICS 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Chemistry 201 4 

Home Economics 370 3 

Home Economics 381 3 

Home Economics 390 3 

Electives 4 



17 



Second Semester 



Chemistry 202 4 

Business Administration 3 

Home Economics 380 3 

Psychology 330 3 

Education 320 3 



16 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Home Economics 382 3 

Home Economics 430 2 

Home Economics 440 4 

Home Economics 470 3 

Electives 4 



16 



Second Semester 



Home Economics 482 3 

Home Economics 391 or 392 3 

Home Economics 372 3 

Home Economics 460 2 

Home Economics 480 1 

Electives 4 



16 



The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 93 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
MATHEMATICS 

Professor McMillan, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Mathematics 160* 5 Mathematics 261 5 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 
SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

Mathematics 262 5 Social Science Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Art, Music, or Speech 3 

Psychology 201 or Philosophy 3 Electives 6 

Electives 2 Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 1 

17 16 
JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Mathematics 370 3 Mathematics 3 

Physics 201 or 241 4 or 5 Physics 202 or 242 4 or 5 

Electives 9 or 10 Electives 8 or 9 

17 16 

SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Mathematics 3 Mathematics 3 

Electives 13 Electives 13 

16 16 

*At the discretion of the mathematics department, a student may elect 
to take the following sequence of courses in mathematics in the freshman and 
sophomore years: 140, 150, 261, 262. 

If a teaching certificate is desired upon graduation, see education require- 
ments for the Class B Secondary Professional Certificate listed on page 46. 

The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 

Specific programs in mathematics are available for students interested in 
teaching, applied mathematics, and preparation for graduate programs in mathe- 
matics. 



94 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

Associate Professor Stewart, Adviser 

Performance and Composition 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Applied Music, Secondary 4 Applied Music 4 

Music 111 4 Music 112 4 

Music 151 3 Music 152 3 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

15 15 
SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Applied Music 4 Applied Music 4 

Music 211 4 Music 212 4 

Foreign Language 101 4 Foreign Language 102 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 
JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Applied Music 4 Applied Music 4 

Music 361 2 Music 362 2 

Music 351 3 Music 352 3 

Music Electives 2 Music Electives 2 

English 241 3 English 242 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 Foreign Language 202 3 

17 17 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Applied Music 4 Applied Music 4 

Music 421 2 Music 422 2 

Music Electives** 8 Music Electives** 8 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

17 17 

Senior Recital Required. 

** Voice major to take additional 6 hours in foreign languages. Composi- 
tion major to take additional 16 hours in theory. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 



95 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Associate Professor Stewart, Adviser 

General Music 
Elementary and Secondary 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



English 101 3 

Biology 101 3 

Music 111 4 

Music 151 3 

Applied Music Primary* 2 

Applied Music Secondary* 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 102 3 

Biology 102 3 

Music 112 4 

Music 152 3 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



English 241 3 

History 101 3 

Physics 100 3 

Music 211 4 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 242 3 

History 102 3 

Chemistry 100 3 

Music 212 4 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Psychology 201 3 

Music 261 2 

Music 361 2 

Music 351 3 

Music 491 2 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 



15 



Second Semester 



Psychology 202 3 

Music 262 2 

Social Science Elective 3 

Music 352 3 

Education 320 3 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 



17 



First Semester 



SENIOR 



Second Semester 



Education 346 2 

Education 356 2 

Education 446, 456 8 

Education 490 3 

Applied Music Primary 1 



16 



Social Science Elective 3 

Applied Music Primary** 3 

Education 476 3 

Music Electives 5 



14 



♦Applied Music Primary and Secondary may be Keyboard and Voice, or Voice 
and Keyboard. 

** Students are encouraged to present full or partial recitals. 



96 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

Associate Professor Stewart, Adviser 

Instrumental Major 
Secondary 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



Biology 101 3 

English 101 3 

Music 111 4 

Music 151 3 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



Biology 102 3 

English 102 3 

Music 112 4 

Music 152 3 

Applied Music Primary 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 

Physical Education 1 

17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



English 241 3 

History 101 3 

Physics 100 3 

Music 211 4 

Music 216 2 

Applied Music Primary 1 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 242 3 

History 102 3 

Chemistry 100 3 

Music 212 4 

Music 226 2 

Applied Music Primary 1 

Physical Education 1 

17 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Psychology 201 3 

Music 316 2 

Music 381 2 

Music 351 3 

Music 491 2 

Applied Music Primary 1 

Applied Music Secondary* 1 

Social Science Elective 3 



17 



Second Semester 



Psychology 202 3 

Music 326 2 

Music 382 2 

Music 352 3 

Education 320 3 

Applied Music Primary 1 

Applied Music Secondary 1 



15 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Education 356 2 

Education 456 8 

Education 490 3 

Applied Music Primary 1 



14 



Second Semester 



Social Sicence Elective 3 

Applied Music Primary** 2 

Applied Music Secondary 1 

Education 476 3 

Music Electives 7 



16 



Major to be String, Wind or Percussion. Minor to be from a family other 
than the major. Freshman minor to be Keyboard until or unless proficiency 
examination is passed. 

♦String Instrument required. 

** Students are encouraged to present full or partial recitals. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 97 

BASIC PREPARATION FOR PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

Alabama College undertakes to prepare students to pursue 
professional work in the fields of their major interests. In the va- 
rious professional fields the College offers courses of study de- 
signed to prepare the student for further work in the profes- 
sional school of his choice. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
BASIC TO MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY 

Professor Kennedy, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Foreign Language 101 4 Foreign Language 102 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

17 17 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

Chemistry 201 4 Chemistry 202 4 

English 3 English 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 Foreign Language 202 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 321 3 Chemistry 322 3 

Philosophy or Psychology 3 Chemistry 210 3 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Art, Music, or Speech 3 Electives 5 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

Electives 2 

15 15 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 240 4 Biology 330 ..: 3 

Physics 201 4 Physics 202 4 

Minor Subject or Elective 3 Minor Subject or Elective 3 

Electives * 5 Electives 6 

16 16 

PREPARATION FOR LAW SCHOOL 

Professor Thomas, Adviser 

No particular major is generally prescribed for admission to 
a law school. Students should follow the liberal arts program 
outlined on page 82 and choose their major field of interest 
with provisions for some work in economics, accounting, statis- 
tics, sociology, and political science. It is recommended that the 
student consult with his adviser before choosing a major. 



98 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BASIC ENGINEERING 

Professor McMillan, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Mathematics 261 5 Mathematics 262 5 

Engineering 161 2 Engineering 162 2 

Engineering 150 2 Speech 140 3 

Physics 241 5 Physics 242 5 

Physical Education :. 1 

18 18 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

Engineering 170 2 Engineering 212 3 

Engineering 211 3 English Literature 3 

History 210 or Economics 250 3 History 210 or Economics 250 3 

Mathematics 370 3 Elective or 

Physical Education 1 Mathematics 452 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 17 

Students may enter the above Basic Engineering program only if they 
qualify for admission to Mathematics 261. 

Students who do not qualify for admission to Mathematics 261 are re- 
quired to complete a minimum of 5 credit hours of introductory college mathe- 
matics. This may be accomplished in summer school prior to the freshman 
year or it may be incorporated in the following program: 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Chemistry 121 4 Chemistry 122 4 

Engineering 161 2 Engineering 162 2 

Mathematics 160 5 Mathematics 261 , 5 

Engineering 150 2 Speech 3 

Physical Education 1 

17 17 
SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

Mathematics 262 5 Mathematics 370 3 

Physics 241 5 Physics 242 5 

History 210 or Economics 250 3 Economics 250 or History 210 3 

Engineering 170 2 English 3 

Physical Education 1 Engineering 211 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 18 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 99 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Vickery, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

French or German 101 4 French or German 102 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

17 17 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

French or German 201 3 French or German 202 3 

Psychology 201 3 Psychology 202 3 

Mathematics 251 3 Art, Music, or Speech 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 
JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Psychology 301 2 Psychology 302 2 

Psychology Electives 5 Psychology Electives 5 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Electives 7 Electives 7 

17 17 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Psychology Electives 6 Psychology Electives 4 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Electives 6 Electives 8 

15 15 



100 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
PSYCHOLOGY (COUNSELING AND GUIDANCE) 

Professor Vickery, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Biology 101 3 Biology 102 3 

Mathematics 140 3 Mathematics 150 3 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Speech, Music or Art 3 Chemistry 100 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

Mathematics 251 3 Physics 100 3 

Psychology 201 3 Psychology 202 3 

Sociology 231 3 Sociology 232 3 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Psychology 301 2 Psychology 302 2 

Psychology 380 2 Psychology 350 or 451 3 

Psychology 410 2 Psychology 360 or 370 2 

Psychology 420 or 470 2 Psychology 430 2 

Minor Subject 3 Education 320 3 

Electives 5 Minor Subject 3 

Electives 2 

16 17 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Psychology 441 2 Psychology 442 2 

Education 342 4 Psychology Elective 3 

Education (H.S. Meth.) 3 Minor Subject 6 

Education 440 3 Electives 5 

Education (Dir. Teach. H.S.) 3 

Education 490 2 

17 16 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 101 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

SOCIOLOGY 

(Pre-professional social work sequence) 

Professor Thomas, Adviser 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 101 3 English 102 3 

Foreign Language 101 4 Foreign Language 102 4 

History 101 3 History 102 3 

Chemistry 100* 3 Physics 100 3 

Sociology 121 2 Sociology 122 2 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester Second Semester 

English 3 English 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 Foreign Language 202 3 

Biology 101* 3 Biology 102 3 

Psychology 201 3 Psychology 202 3 

Sociology 231 3 Sociology 232 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

16 16 
JUNIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Speech 3 Sociology 362 3 

Economics 201 3 Sociology 342 3 

Mathematics 251 3 Economics 202 3 

Political Science 200 3 Political Science 251 3 

Minor Subject 3 Minor Subject 3 

Electives 2 Electives 2 

17 17 
SENIOR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Sociology 421 3 Sociology 462 3 

Sociology 461 3 Sociology 472 2 

Sociology 471 2 Sociology 331 3 

Home Economics 391 3 Electives 8 

Electives 5 

16 16 

♦Mathematics 130 and 140 or 150 may be taken instead of six hours of 
science. 

The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 

See page 76 for requirements for a major in general sociology. 



102 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 
SPEECH 

Professor Wright, Adviser 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



English 101 3 

Foreign Language 101 4 

History 101 3 

Chemistry 100 3 

Speech 140 or 150 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



Second Semester 



English 102 3 

Foreign Language 102 4 

History 102 3 

Physics 100 3 

Speech 150 or 140 3 

Physical Education 1 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



English 3 

Foreign Language 201 3 

Biology 101 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Speech 340 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



Second Semester 



English 3 

Foreign Language 202 3 

Biology 102 3 

Social Science Elective 3 

Speech 120 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Speech 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Minor Subject 3 

Electives 7 



16 



Second Semester 



Speech 6 

Psychology 430 2 

Minor Subject 3 

Electives 5 



16 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Speech 3 

Electives 13 



16 



Speech 6 

Electives 10 



16 



If a teaching certificate is desired upon graduation, see education require- 
ments for the Class B Elementary-Secondary certificate listed on page 46. The 
social science elective in the sophomore year should be chosen from economics, 
geography, political science, or sociology. 



The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 



DEGREES AND CURRICULA 



103 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
SPEECH CORRECTION 

Professor Wright, Adviser 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



English 101 3 

History 101 3 

Chemistry 100 3 

Speech 150 3 

Physical Education 1 

Electives 3 



16 



Second Semester 



English 102 3 

History 102 3 

Physics 100 3 

Speech 240 3 

Physical Education 1 

Electives 3 



16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester 



English 3 

Biology 101 3 

Social Science Elective* 3 

Speech 340 3 

Psychology 201 3 

Physical Education 1 



16 



Second Semester 



English 3 

Biology 102 3 

Social Science Elective* 3 

Speech 320 3 

Electives y 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 



First Semester 



JUNIOR 



Speech 371 3 

Speech 472 3 

Education 320 3 

Psychology 380 2 

Biology 240 4 

Electives 2 



17 



Second Semester 



Speech 372 3 

Speech 410 3 

Psychology 360 2 

Psychology 430 2 

Biology 330 3 

Electives 4 



17 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



Speech 381 3 

Education 389 4 

Education 469 3 

Education 490 2 

Electives 4 



Second Semester 



Speech 471 3 

Speech 481 3 

Education 479 3 

Education 471 3 

Electives 4 



16 



16 



Upon completion of this curriculum the student is qualified for the Class 
B Elementary-Secondary Professional certificate. 

The free electives must be taken in courses other than the major. 

* Should be chosen from economics, geography, political science, or sociology. 



104 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 

SEMESTER SYSTEM 

The semester system, based on the division of the academic 
year into two semesters of approximately eighteen weeks each 
and a summer school of ten weeks, is used. Resident study during 
any two semesters or three summer schools is equivalent to one 
academic year. 

UNIT OF CREDIT 

The unit of credit is the semester hour, each representing 
one hour of recitation with two hours of preparation a week for 
a period of approximately eighteen weeks. As a rule, two hours 
of laboratory work count as one hour of class work. 

COURSE NUMBERS 

When the numbers of a course are separated by a hyphen, 
the work of both semesters must be completed before any credit 
will be granted for the course. When the numbers are separated 
by a comma, credit will be granted for either semester's work 
completed. 

Freshman courses extending through both semesters are num- 
bered 101-2, 111-2, 121-2, 131-2, and 141-2. One semester courses 
are numbered 151, 152; 161, 162; 171, 172; 181, 182, and 191, 
192. One-semester courses repeated during the year are numbered 
100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180, and 190. 

Sophomore, junior and senior courses extending through the 
year are numbered 201 to 242, 301 to 342, and 401 to 442, re- 
spectively. One-semester courses are numbered 251 to 292, 351 
to 392, and 451 to 492, respectively. Those courses repeated du- 
ring the year are numbered in multiples of ten as follows: sopho- 
more courses from 200 to 290; junior courses from 300 to 390; 
senior courses from 400 to 490. 

The first number represents the class and the last number the 
semester, with the exception that courses numbered in multiples 
of ten may be offered either the first or second semester. 

The College reserves the right to withdraw any course of- 
fered when the enrollment in the course is less than ten. The 
decision in all cases will be made by the Dean of the College. 

COURSE LOAD 

The regular amount of work for a student is sixteen hours a 
semester. Except in unusual cases, no student is allowed to take 
more than seventeen hours of work unless he has an average of 
B for the previous semester, the consent of the College Physician, 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 105 

the Chairman of the Department in which he is a major, and the 
Dean. 

AUDIT 

Students who have an average of C or better may be allowed 
to audit one course, provided they have the approval of the Dean 
of the College, the Chairman of their major department and the 
teacher of the course. The charge for auditing a course is $5.00 
per semester when the credit hours involved exceed the normal 
course load. 

CHANGES IN COURSES 

All changes in a course of study must be approved by the 
Dean, and are not allowed after the second week from the begin- 
ning of classes. Courses may be dropped or added without cost 
the first week after the beginning of classes. A charge of $2.00 
will be made for each change made during the second week, un- 
less such change is initiated by the College itself. Students who 
drop a course after this time will receive a grade of F in the 
course. Exceptions may be made on recommendation of the Col- 
lege Physician or the chairman of the department in which the 
student is majoring. Any student who attends a class which is not 
listed on the Registrar's card and without the permission of the 
Dean will receive no credit for such work, and a student who 
drops a course without approval of the Dean will receive an F on 
the course at the end of the semester. Students who wish to 
change their major or minor field, once these have been selected, 
must have the written approval of the Dean before any change 
is made. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each change. 

COURSES REPEATED 

A student who has failed a course may repeat the course for 
credit, but in computing the grade point average both courses 
will count as work attempted. 

A course may be repeated one time to improve the student's 
grade. Although no additional credit will be allowed, the grade 
points will be counted; and the hours will count as work at- 
tempted in computing the grade point average. 

GRADES AND RECORDS 
Grades 

Final grades for each semester are recorded and preserved. 
Reports are submitted to students and to their parents or guar- 
dians at mid-semester and at the close of the semester. These 
grades represent the teacher's estimate of recitation, laboratory 
work, written work and final examinations. The grades are indi- 
cated as follows: A — Excellent; B — Good; C — Average; D — Pass- 



106 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

ing; E — Condition; F — Failure; I — Incomplete; S — Satisfactory; 
U — Unsatisfactory. 

The passing grade is D, but juniors and seniors electing 
freshman and sophomore subjects must make C. 

A course on which a grade of F is received must be repeated 
in class. In order to receive credit for a course in which a grade 
of E is received, the student must take the condition examination 
the next semester in which he is in residence, on the date indi- 
cated in the College calendar. The only grades that can be earned 
through a condition examination are the grades of D or F. In 
order to receive credit for a course in which a grade of I is re- 
ceived, the student must complete the work during the next se- 
mester. If he is not in residence the following semester the work 
must be completed within a twelve-month period. 

In order to earn grade points in a course where a grade of 
D has been made, a student may repeat the course one time. No 
additional credit may be earned where such course is repeated. 

Grade Points 

Credits and grade points are earned and recorded on the 
following basis: 

Grade Grade Points Per Hour 

A 3 

B 2 

C 1 

D 

E 

F 

I 

Honors 

A student who completes the work for a degree with as many 
as 2.50 grade points for each hour attempted is graduated with 
highest honors and this is cited with the degree. 

A student who completes the work for a degree with as many 
as 2.00 grade points for each hour attempted is graduated with 
honors and this is cited with the degree. Honors awarded to 
transfer students will be based upon grades earned at Alabama 
College. 

Transcript of Record 

Graduates and other former students who have met their fi- 
nancial obligations to the College may secure transcripts of their 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 107 

records from the Registrar. Each will be furnished one complete 
transcript free, but a charge of $1.00 will be made for each ad- 
ditional copy. 

CONDITION EXAMINATIONS 

Condition examinations will be given on the dates specified 
in the College Calendar. Applications for these examinations must 
be in the office of the Dean not less than five days prior to the 
date of the examination. A charge of $3.00 per examination will 
be made, and a receipt from the Business Office will be required 
for admission to the examination. 

FAILURE TO TAKE FINAL EXAMINATION 

If a student is unable to take his final examinations because 
of illness or other reasons acceptable to the Dean, he must take 
them the following semester. Otherwise a grade of F will be en- 
tered for each course. If he is not in residence the following 
semester the examination must be taken within a twelve-month 
period. A charge of $3.00 per examination will be made with a 
maximum charge of $10.00, and a receipt from the Business Of- 
fice will be required for admission to the examination. 

SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS 
Scholastic Probation 

A first year student must pass one-half of the hours attempt- 
ed and earn 6 grade points each semester or be placed on scholas- 
tic probation the following semester. 

A second year student must pass at least 10 hours and earn 
10 grade points each semester or be placed on scholastic proba- 
tion the following semester. 

A third or fourth year student must pass at least 12 hours 
and earn 12 grade points each semester or be placed on scholas- 
tic probation the following semester. 

Candidates for the degree who fail to meet scholastic stand- 
ards for their class in their last semester must remain in resi- 
dence one additional semester, carrying a normal load on which 
they must meet the standards of their class. 

An irregular student taking 6 semester hours, or less, must 
make a C average for each semester or have an overall C average, 
or be placed on probation. 

Students who have an average of C or better for all work 
done at the College, including the semester in which they fail 
to meet the minimum requirements, may, at the discretion of the 
Dean, be warned instead of being placed on probation. 



108 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

A semester of the regular session or a full summer session 
may be used to lift scholastic probation. 

Scholastic Suspension 

A first year student must pass at least 6 hours each semester 
in order to continue in attendance the following semester, and 
must pass at least 16 hours during the first year and earn 12 
grade points to continue in attendance the following semester. 

A second, third, or fourth year student must pass at least 6 
hours each semester in order to continue in attendance the fol- 
lowing semester. 

A student who has been placed on scholastic probation and 
who at the end of that semester or summer school has not earned 
the hours and grade points required for his class as indicated 
under Scholastic Probation, will be placed on Scholastic Suspen- 
sion. This may be removed by attending a full summer school, or 
if the student elects not to attend the summer school, he will be 
ineligible to continue in attendance until after one semester of 
the regular session has elapsed. 

A student who is on Scholastic Suspension is automatically 
placed on probation the first semester or summer school after 
he re-enters. 

A minimum of 12 hours must be carried in order for a stu- 
dent to remove scholastic probation. When the student takes 
fewer than 12 semester hours he continues on scholastic probation 
for the next semester he is in attendance. He will be permitted to 
carry fewer than 12 hours for one semester only without special 
permssion from the Dean of the College. 

At the end of the semester, any student placed on probation 
shall receive notice from the Dean, and names of all students 
placed on probation shall be sent to Administrative Officers, 
Faculty, and the President of the Student Government. Students' 
parents shall also be notified by the Dean when their sons and 
daughters are placed on scholastic probation or suspension. 

Permanent Scholastic Suspension 

A student who is suspended the first time for failure to 
meet scholastic standards may re-enter under conditions given 
above, but a student who is suspended the second time or placed 
on scholastic probation the third time is not permitted to re-enter. 

Credit shall be allowed for work done in residence with an 
acceptable grade in any other accredited institution during the 
period of scholastic suspension. No credit shall be given for cor- 
respondence or extension courses during the period. 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 109 

ELIGIBILITY TO REPRESENT COLLEGE 

Students who are on scholastic or social probation are not 
eligible to represent the college in athletic or public perform- 
ances. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE 

A student who resigns during any semester or summer term 
will submit his resignation in person or in writing to the appro- 
priate Dean of Students, giving the reason therefor. A with- 
drawal form will be filled out by the appropriate Dean. This 
withdrawal form, together with the Identification Card and meal 
ticket, must be approved by the Dean of the College. All ac- 
counts must be settled before any allowable refund is made. In 
the absence of a formal resignation in conformity with the fore- 
going requirements, no refund of any kind will be approved; the 
courses in which the student is enrolled will be recorded as fail- 
ures, and his record will show that he is not in good standing. 

ABSENCE REGULATIONS 

All Freshman and Sophomore students at Alabama College 
are under class absence regulations. Two types of class absences 
are recognized — unauthorized and authorized. The regulations 
apply only to unauthorized absences. 

Authorized absences are: 

1. Illness 

(a) Infirmary 

(b) Statement from family physician approved by the 
Director of Health Services (College Physician). 

2. Serious illness or death in the student's immediate family. 

3. Making a trip considered as a part of the instructional 
program of the College and which requires absence from 
class. 

4. Participation in activities directly sponsored by and in the 
interest of the College. 

Upon the accumulation of jive unauthorized absences in a 
single course during the semester, any student will be automatic- 
ally dropped from the course with a grade of F. The Dean of 
the College will inform the student, the instructor, and the 
parents of the action. 

Should a student accumulate a total of twelve unauthorized 
or unexcused absences in any combination of courses, he will be 
subject to suspension from the College. In the event of suspension 
the student will receive F's in all courses. 



110 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Any student on academic probation will be automatically 
dropped from a course with a grade of F upon the accumulation 
of three unauthorized absences during a semester. Upon the ac- 
cumulation of a total of eight unauthorized absences in any com- 
bination of courses, any student on academic probation will be 
subject to suspension from the college. In the event of suspension 
the student will receive F's in all courses. 

Juniors and Seniors (except those on scholastic probation) 
are exempt from the regulations above. These students make 
their own decisions regarding class attendance accepting the re- 
sponsibility that is necessarily involved, and realizing that all 
students are responsible for all work missed by absence from class. 

Juniors or Seniors who miss more than one-sixth of the class 
recitations in a course, even though some or all may be authorized 
absences, must secure the approval of the Dean to take final ex- 
aminations in such courses. Failure to satisfactorily account for 
such absences will bar the student from the examination and a 
grade of F will be recorded. 

Absences before and after a holiday. All unauthorized ab- 
sences on the day before and the day following holiday periods 
will be counted as double absences in computing the total num- 
ber of unauthorized absences as established under the above regu- 
lations. 

CONVOCATIONS 

Special convocations have been set up in the year's calendar 
by the President of the College. Convocations are an integral 
part of the College's total program and attendance is expected 
on the part of students, faculty, and staff. One semester hour will 
be added to hours required for graduation for each three un- 
authorized absences from convocation when a student is required 
to attend. 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 111 

DEGREES OFFERED 

Alabama College offers four undergraduate degrees, the 
Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Mu- 
sic Education and the Bachelor of Music. The College also issues 
a graduate degree, the Master of Arts in Teaching. 

Bachelor of Arts degrees will be awarded only in the fol- 
lowing major fields: Art, Economics, Elementary Education, Eng- 
lish, Foreign Language, History, Music, Political Science, Psy- 
chology, Social Science, Sociology, Speech. 

Bachelor of Science degrees will be awarded only in the fol- 
lowing major fields: Biology, Chemistry, Elementary Education, 
Mathematics, Physics, Physical Education, Speech Correction, Busi- 
ness Administration, Secretarial Administration, Home Economics. 
Psychology (Counseling and Guidance). 

Bachelor of Music Education degrees are awarded to those 
students who have both a major and a minor in music and who 
have completed the education and psychology requirements for 
a teaching certificate. 

The Bachelor of Music degree is awarded those majoring in 
music who do not take the pre-professional courses required of 
those who prepare to teach. 

MAJOR AND MINOR 

The major and minor fields should be chosen by the end of 
the sophomore year. 

The requirements for major and minor subjects are as fol- 
lows: 

(a) A major in an academic subject consists of from twenty- 
four to thirty-six hours. 

(b) A minor is composed of from eighteen to twenty-four 
hours. 

(c) Courses for the major and minor must be selected with 
the advice of the chairman in the major department and 
with the approval of the Dean. 

(d) The free electives must be taken in courses other than 
the major. 

INTER-DEPARTMENT MINORS 

It is possible to complete inter-department minors in Child 
Care and General Science at Alabama College. 

Child Care. This minor is designed to meet the needs of 
social workers who desire additional preparation in the field of 
child care and guidance. Students with this training are prepared 
for work in child-caring institutions and in day-care centers. 






112 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

The following courses are required for a minor, and the 
description of each course will be found under departmental 
announcements : 

Speech 351 or English 310, Home Economics 392 or Psy- 
chology 380, Home Economics 391, and Psychology 350. 

Electives may be selected from the following courses to com- 
plete the eighteen hours: Art 341; Physical Education 291, 292; 
Music 121-122; Physical Education 140; Psychology 451; Psychol- 
ogy 470; and such other subjects approved by the Chairman of 
the Social Science Department. 

General Science. A minor in general science shall be made 
up of two semesters of biology, two semesters of chemistry, and 
two semesters of physics. 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 



113 



REQUIREMENTS IN GENERAL EDUCATION FOR THE 

SEVERAL DEGREES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

I. The requirements in general education for the Bachelor of 
Arts and the Bachelor of Science Degrees are as follows: 

A. English composition and literature — 6 semester hours 

B. English electives — 6 semester hours 

C. Biology, physical science, or mathematics. Six hours from 
each of two of these — 12 semester hours.* 

D. World civilization and culture — 6 semester hours 

E. Electives from American history, economics, geography, 
sociology, political science — 6 semester hours 

F. Electives from art, music, or speech — 3 semester hours 

G. Electives from philosophy, psychology or religion — 3 
semester hours. 

H. Physical education activities — 4 semester hours 

II. Additional requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree: 
A. French, Spanish, German or Latin — 6-14 semester hours 
from one of these three. 

III. Additional requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree: 
A. Mathematics, chemistry, physics, or biology — 6 semester 

hours. 

IV. Bachelor of Arts degrees will be awarded only in the follow- 
ing major fields: Art, Economics, Elementary Education, 
English, Foreign Language, History, Political Science, Psy- 
chology, Social Science, Sociology, Speech. 

V. Bachelor of Science degrees will be awarded only in the fol- 
lowing major fields: Biology, Chemistry, Elementary Edu- 
cation, Mathematics, Physics, Physical Education, Speech Cor- 
rection, Business Administration, Secretarial Administration, 
Home Economics, Psychology (Counseling and Guidance). 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC EDUCATION 

The requirements in general education for the Bachelor of 
Music Education degree are the same as the general education 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree except that six hours 
of psychology are required instead of three hours and no foreign 
language is required. 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

The requirements in general education for the Bachelor of 
Music degree are the same as the general education requirements 
for the Bachelor of Arts degree except that science and mathe- 
matics are not required, and only eight hours of a foreign lan- 
uage are required instead of fourteen hours. 

♦Three semester hours of the physical science requirement must be taken in 
either chemistry or physics. 



114 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

1. An applicant for a degree must have credit for a minimum 
of 130 semester hours of work distributed according to curricu- 
lum requirements, 130 grade points, and a residence of not less 
than 130 weeks. These minima must be attained in all three 
areas — semester hours, grade points, and weeks of residence 1 . 

2. No regular student shall be permitted to spend more than 
ten semesters, or the equivalent in summer schools, in completing 
the work for a degree at Alabama College, unless unusual cir- 
cumstances such as bona fide change of major attend the case. 
In all cases the approval of the Dean of the College is required. 

3. Students transferring to Alabama College from other col- 
leges may receive up to, but not more than, 65 semester hours 
credit toward satisfaction of degree requirements. Grade point 
averages of transfer students are calculated solely on the basis 
of grades earned at Alabama College. Transfer students must 
meet the requirements referred to in paragraph one above. 

4. Not more than thirty semester hours of extension and/or 
correspondence credit may be applied toward a degree. 

5. The last six hours of the major and the minor subjects 
must be completed at Alabama College, and the final semester 
of work must be spent in full time residence at Alabama College. 

6. Candidates for degrees must earn at least one grade point 
for each hour required for the major and minor. 

7. Students who fail to earn the requisite number of grade 
points by the time they complete the courses specified for the 
degree may take sufficient additional work to earn the required 
number of grade points, but such courses must be approved by 
the Dean and the Chairman of the Department, and subject to 
the limitations in number 2 above. 

8. Candidates for the degree who fail to meet scholastic 
standards for their class in their last semester must remain in 
residence one additional semester, carrying a normal load on 
which they must meet the standards of their class. 

9. On the recommendation of the College Physician and with 
the approval of the Dean, students may substitute credits earned 



1. The number of weeks of residence will correspond with the number of 
hours attempted, with the exception that a maximum of 17 weeks will be 
counted for a semester of work, regardless of the number of excess hours at- 
tempted, and a maximum of six weeks (5 or 6 hours) for a summer term, 
regardless of the excess hours attempted. Whether the student is doing full or 
part-time work, on the campus or off-campus, this relationship of credit hours 
to number of weeks will prevail. 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 115 

in other courses to meet deficiencies in physical education ac- 
tivities. 

10. The responsibility for meeting the requirements for a 
degree rests with the student. 

11. A formal application for a degree must be filed in the 
Registrar's office before the beginning of the last semester and 
preferably one year in advance of the date on which the degree 
is to be conferred. 

12. No degree will be conferred upon any student nor will 
any other evidence of graduation be provided until all financial 
obligations to the College, including the diploma fee, have been 
met. 

13. The work of both semesters of a course in which a hy- 
phen separates the course numbers must be completed before 
credit will be granted for that course. 

14. Each student is required to take the aptitude and area 
tests of the Graduate Record Examinations before graduation. 

15. Acceleration. 

(a) Students, except those majoring in physical educa- 
tion or music, have an opportunity to earn the 
Bachelor's degree in three years by attending three 
regular sessions and three summer schools. Those 
majoring in physical education or music should at- 
tend four regular sessions. 

(b) A student who wants to follow this accelerated pro- 
gram and be graduated in the spring should enter 
college at the opening of a summer school. Students 
entering in September and attending three regular 
sessions and three full summer schools should ex- 
pect to be graduated at the end of a summer school. 

16. Graduation from Alabama College is not automatic upon 
fulfilling the quantitative requirements for a degree in a specified 
curriculum. Every student upon whom a degree is conferred must 
have a satisfactory conduct record, and, unless excused in writing 
by the Dean of the College, must attend all graduation exercises. 

17. No department may require for its major hours in ex- 
cess of 36 or those now in effect. No student may increase the 
hours in the major, or minor of 24 hours, from his elective hours 
except upon the approval of the Dean of the College, who will 
grant such additional hours only when the student establishes a 
good and sufficient reason for such addition. Any hours taken 
in excess of the 24-36 hours in the major or of the 18-24 hours 



116 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

in the minor without the approval of the Dean will be counted 
in excess of the 130 hours required for a degree. 

18. Each curriculum for the first four semesters shall have 
not less than three hours electives each semester to permit stu- 
dents to select special interests if they so choose. However, not 
more than 12 semester hours may be earned toward a major du- 
ring the freshman and sophomore years combined, except where 
the faculty has granted special approval. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

In order to secure teachers' certificates on graduation, the 
major and minor subjects must be those which have been ap- 
proved by the State Department of Education for certification. 
In addition to the major and minor approved subjects, a student 
must have a minimum of 14-18 hours in education and 6-10 hours 
in psychology, or 24 hours in both, for the secondary certificate; 
and 20-24 hours in education and 6-10 hours in psychology, or 
30 hours in both, for the elementary certificate. 

Students at Alabama College must not exceed the hours in 
education and psychology as outlined above except by the ap- 
proval of the Dean. 

Students desiring teachers' certificates should check require- 
ments with the Registrar during the junior year. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS 

During the summer of 1955, Alabama College initiated a 
graduate program for elementary teachers. Since that time the 
program has been enlarged to include training for secondary 
teaching, and training for counseling and guidance. The graduate 
program leads to the Master of Arts Degree in Teaching. 

The program requires thirty-three semester hours of work 
which can be earned in three full summer sessions. During the 
regular session certain courses carrying graduate credit are given 
in the late afternoon or night for the convenience of teachers 
within commuting distance. By attending late afternoon or night 
classes and earning twelve semester hours of credit and twelve 
weeks of residence, a student may complete requirements for the 
master's degree within two full summer sessions. A student must 
have a C+ average on undergraduate work and/or must make 
a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Examinations in 
order to be eligible for the graduate program. 

For particulars about the graduate program write to the Di- 
rector of the Summer School or to the Dean of the College ask- 
ing for a bulletin dealing with the graduate division. 



ADMINISTRATION OF THE CURRICULA 



117 



EUROPEAN SEMINAR 

In the summers of 1959, 1961, and 1963, Alabama College 
conducted a European Seminar in which students from Alabama 
College and other colleges studied abroad. The students followed 
a course of studies with lectures and tours set up in cooperation 
with the Netherlands Office for Foreign Student Relations, and 
supervised by a Director appointed by the President upon the rec- 
ommendation of the European Seminar Faculty Committee. The 
Seminar covered a period of seven weeks, and permitted the stu- 
dent to study and gain some knowledge of England, France, and 
the Netherlands. Students earned credit in art, music, or the 
social sciences. Plans are being made to continue the Seminar. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

In the fall of 1959, Alabama College initiated a voluntary 
honors program to provide for the superior student intellectual 
opportunities for study and research not available in the regu- 
lar curriculum. 

The major incentive for honors work is the student's own 
desire to obtain a broader and deeper understanding of the 
areas of knowledge studied. 

Students interested in this program should inquire for par- 
ticulars to the Chairman of the Honors Committee. 



118 



ALABAMA COLLEGE 



DIRECTORY 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

His Excellency, George C. Wallace, Governor of Alabama, 

President, ex-officio 



Austin R. Meadows, State 


Superintendent 


of Education, ex- 


■officio 
Term 


Name 


Address 


District 


Expires 


Mrs. N. J. Bell, Jr. 


Montgomery 


Second 


1971 


Mr. W. Van Gilbert 


Athens 


Eighth 


1971 


Dr. J. L. Hardwick 


Talladega 


Fourth 


1967 


Mr. Joe L. Jennings 


West Point, G; 


i. State-at-Large 


1971 


Judge Roy Mayhall 


Jasper 


Seventh 


1967 


Mrs. E. N. Merriwether 


Theodore 


First 


1967 


Mrs. Marvin Rains 


Fort Payne 


Fifth 


1971 


Mrs. Isaac Riley 


Ozark 


Third 


1975 


Mr. Alton E. Schermer 


Fairhope 


State-at-Large 


1975 


Mr. James M. Tingle 


Birmingham 


Ninth 


1975 


Mr. Wales W. Wallace, Jr. 


Columbiana 


Sixth 


1975 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Wales W. Wallace Jr., Chairman 

James M. Tingle, Vice-Chairman 

J. L. Hardwick 

Mrs. E. N. Merriwether 

Mrs. Isaac Riley 



DIRECTORY 119 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Delos P. Culp, B.S., M.S., Ed.D President 

John B. Walters, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of the College 

Adelaide P. Paty, B.S Dean of Women 

James R. Wilkinson, B.S., M.E Dean of Men 

Lee Barclay, B.S., M.A Business Manager and Treasurer 

L. C. Parnell, M.D Director, Student Health Services 

Chrystine G. Edwards Supervisor of Food Services 

Bessie M. Elliott Assistant Treasurer 

Aubrey C. Folsom... .Director of Operations and Planning Engineer 

Virginia Hendrick Registrar 

Laura Frances Mathison, B.S Alumi Director 

Leslie Kermit Mathison, B.S., M.S 

Director of Admissions and Recruitment 

Ralph Sears, B.S., M.A Director of Public Relations 

Robert Somers, B.A., M.A Director of Libraries 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY EMERITI 

M. L. Orr, Sr., Ph.D Dean of the College 

Lois A. Ackerley, Ph.D Professor of Home Economics 

Lelah Brownfield, M.A Professor of Business Administration 

Mary Decker, M.S Professor of Chemistry 

Josephine Eddy, M.A Associate Professor of Home Economics 

Katherine Farrah Associate Professor of Music 

Laura Hadley, M.S Associate Professor of Education 

and Assistant Director of Extension 

Rosa Lee Jackson, Ph.D Professor of Mathematics 

H. D. LeBaron, M.A Professor of Music 

Lorraine Pierson, Ph.D Professor of Foreign Languages 

Abi Russell, A.B., M.S Director of Libraries 

Elizabeth Stockton, M.A Associate Professor of 

Foreign Languages 

W. H. Trumbauer, Ph.D Professor of Dramatic Literature 

and Director of College Theatre 

Lillian K. Ward, A.B Assistant Professor of English 

M. Ziolkowski Professor of Music 



120 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

THE FACULTY 

ACADEMIC FACULTY— THE COLLEGE 

Culp, Delos Poe, 

President. 

B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Walters, John Bennett, Jr., 
Dean of the College. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Adams, Marla Jane, 
Instructor of English. 

B.A., King College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Allen, Martha, 

Associate Professor of Art. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Anderson, Floyd, 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., George Peabody College. 

Baker, Jennie R., 

Instructor of Mathematics. 

B.S., Eastern State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Barnes, Virginia W., 
Associate Professor of Art. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.A., Columbia University. 
BEHRENDT, GERALDINE KULLMAN,f 

Instructor of Music. 

B.M., Cleveland Institute of Music. 

Benejam, Luis,f 

Instructor of Alusic. 

B.A., Royal Conservatory of Barcelona; M.M., University of Alabama. 

Berry, Sara Lou, 

Instructor of English. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.A., University of Florida. 

Bickham, Ethel, 

Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., M.S., Ohio State University. 

Blackmon, Charlotte D., 

Instructor of English. 

A.B., Alabama College. 

Blackmon, Fred C, 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

B.S., University of Michigan; M.Ed., Alabama College. 



tPart Time 



DIRECTORY 121 

Broxton, June A., 

Associate Professor of Psychology. 

B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Peabody College; Ph.D., University of 
Kentucky. 

Cardone, Joseph M., 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

B. S., Birmingham-Southern; M.S., Auburn University. 

Chichester, W. T., 

Associate Professor of Speech. 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Cobb, William, 

Instructor of English. 

B.A., Livingston State College; M.A., Vanderbilt University. 

Collins, Miriam, 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Connell, James F. L., 

Professor of Biology and Geology. 

B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

Cotter, David James, 

Associate Professor of Biology. 

B.S., A.B., M.S., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Cowan, Robert H., 

Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.S., M.S., Juilliard School of Music; D.M.A., Eastman School of Music. 

Crew, Jeanette, 

Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
A.B., Judson College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Davis, Leon G., 

Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 

B.S., Troy State College; M.Ed., Auburn University. 

Davis, Maxine Couch, 
Professor of Music. 

B.M., Alabama College; M.Mus., Eastman School of Music; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Michigan; Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Dunn, Minnie, 

Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Columbia University. 

Dunstan, Mary F., 

Associate Professor of Business Administration. 

A.B., Florida State University; M.S., New York University. 

Elder, Owen C, 
Instructor of English. 

B.A., M.A., Bowling Green State University. 



122 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Elliott, Patricia Ann, 

Acting Chairman, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., Catawba College; MA., University of North Carolina. 

Fancher, B. Eugene, 

Associate Professor of Education. 

B.A., Southwestern State College; M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Oklahoma. 

Finger, Bernice, 

Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. 

A.B., Huntingdon College; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

Flynn, Murray C, 

Associate Professor of Economics. 

A.B., University of Kansas; M.A., University of Texas. 

Folsom, Florence S., 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women; Certificate in Dietetics, Vander- 
bilt University Hospital. 

Freeze, Chester R., 

Associate Professor of Education. 

B.S., Marion College; M.Ed., University of South Dakota; D.Ed., University 
of Alabama. 

Golson, Eva, 

Professor of English. 

A.B., Huntingdon College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
GORGEY, LASZLO, 

Assistant Professor of Social Sciences. 

B.A., Hungarian Royal Military Academy; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Gorgey, Paula, 

Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., Hungarian Royal Teacher's College for Girls. 

Gormley, Charles L., 

Chairman, Professor of Education. 

A.B., Fresno State College; Ed.D., Stanford University. 

Graham, Jeanne, 

Instructor of Speech, Director of Forensics. 

B.A., Memphis State University; M.A., Florida State University. 

Greene, William F., 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration, 

B.S., Middle Tennessee State College, M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Griffith, Lucille, 
Professor of History. 

A.B., Belhaven College; M.A., Tulane University; Ph.D., Brown University. 

Groover, Robert Don, 

Instructor of Biology. 

B.S., M.S., University of Alabama. 

Guitart, Miguel A., 

Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

B.S., Institute of Santiago de Cuba; Ph.D., University of Havana. 



DIRECTORY 123 

Harbour, Charles C, 

Assistant Professor of Speech. 

A.B., University of Mississippi; M.A., University of Texas. 

Harris, Robert James, 

Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

B.A, Carroll College; B.S., M.A., University of Alabama. 

Healey, Betty W., 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., University of Georgia; M.A., New York University. 

Hernandez, Angela, 

Associate Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

B.S., Institute of Vedada; Doctor of Physical Sciences, University of 
Havana. 

House, Henry P., 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A.B., M.A., Indiana University. 

Jackson, Jesse J., 

Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., University of Tampa; M.A., Florida State University. 

Jackson, Shirley F., 

Assistant Professor of History. 

B.S., M.A., Florida State University. 
KENNERLY, W. J., 

Chairman, Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Clemson College; M.S., Emory University. 

Larkin, Mary, 

Acting Chairman, Residennt Teacher Trainer in Home 
Economics Education. 

B.S., Alabama College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Lightfoot, Frank, 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

B.S., M.A., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Lightsey, Sara Nell, 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

B.S., Alabama College; M.S., University of Alabama. 

Lott, John Bertrand, 

Chairman, Associate Professor of English. 

B.A., Millsaps College; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Lumby, Betty Louise, 

Associate Professor of Music. 

B.Mus., Detroit Institute of Music and Art; B.Mus., University of Detroit; 
M.Mus., University of Michigan; D.S.M., Union Theological Seminary of 
New York. 

Mayfield, Milton Ray, 

Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; M.A., University of Alabama. 



124 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

McGurk, Frank C. J., 
Professor of Psychology. 

B.S., M.A., Unversity of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Catholic University of 
America. 

McMillan, Daniel R., 

Chairman, Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S., Emory University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Merijanian, Aris, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Kansas State University; M.A., Southwest Texas State; Ph.D., Texas 
Agricultural and Mechanical College. 

Meroney, Eloise, 

Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., University of Alabama; M.A., Columbia University. 
MlDDAUGH, BENNIE, 

Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., North Texas State University; M. M., Michigan State University. 

Moeck, Walter,! 
Instructor of Music. 

B.M. Eastman School of Music; M.A., State University of Iowa; Fellow 
FIAL. 

Morgan, Sara Ruth, 

Acting Chairman, Associate Professor of Business Administration. 

B.S., Asheville College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Mount, Robert Hughes, 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Myrick, Geneva, 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

B.S., Alabama College; M.A., George Peabody College. 

Newton, Wesley P., 

Assistant Professor of History. 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., University of Alabama. 

Niven, Jeanette, 

Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.S., Tulane University. 

Oesterling, Marie Ann, 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration. 

B.S., Howard College; M.A., University of Alabama. 

Owsley, Mabel, 

Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

B.F.A., University of Alabama; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Palmer, Chester, 

Chairman, Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation. 

B.S., Rice Institute; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 



IPart Time 



DIRECTORY 125 

Pritchett, Theodore M., 

Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern College; M.M.Ed., Florida State University. 

Puryear, Sarah, 

Associate Professor of English. 

A.B., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Peabody College. 

Quiroz, Anthony J., 

Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

B.A., Notre Dame Seminary; M.A., Louisiana State University. 

Roe, Vivian I., 

Associate Professor of Speech and Director of Speech Clinic. 

B.A., State University of Iowa; M.A., M.S., Indiana University. 

Rotenberry, Julia, 

Assistant Librarian. 

A.B., Alabama College; B.S. in L.S., University of North Carolina. 

Sears, Marcia,! 

Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., University of Nebraska. 

Shirley, A. Neal, 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

B.S., Alabama College; M.A., Louisiana State University. 

Sledge, Eugene B., 

Assistant Professor of Biology. 

B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Sneed, Kate C, 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Somers, Robert B., 
Director of Libraries. 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Florida State University. 

Spicer, John H., 

Assistant Professor of Art. 

B.S., Kansas State College; B.F.A., M.A., University of Wichita. 

Stewart, John Walter, 

Chairman, Associate Professor of Music. 

B.M.E., M.M.E., Louisiana State University; Ed.D., Florida State University. 

Strom, Ina L., 

Assistant Professor of Music. 

B.M., Northwestern University. 

Suttle, John F., 

Instructor of Basic Engineering. 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Terry, Allen L., 

Associate Professor of Business Administration. 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Alabama. 



tPart Time 



126 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

Thomas, Barbara,! 
Instructor of Music. 

B.M., M.M., Birmingham-Southern College. 

Thomas, James D., 

Chairman, Department of Social Sciences; Professor of 

Political Science. 

B.S., M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.A., University of Alabama; 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Tipton, Mary Frances, 
General Assistant, Library. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.S., Florida State University. 

Tolbert, Bruce, 

Associate Professor of Music. 

B.A., M.F.A., Ohio University. 

Tolbert, Carolyn B.,f 

Instructor of Foreign Languages. 

A.B., University of North Carolina. 

Triplett, Reuben A., 

Assistant Professor of History. 

B.A., M.A., Mississippi State University. 

Trumbauer, Willilee R., 

Associate Professor of Speech. 

A.B., Alabama College; M.A., Vanderbilt University. 

Turner, Henry F., 

Chairman, Professor of Biology. 

B.S., M.S., Auburn University; Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Turpin, Thomas D., 

Chairman, Associate Professor of Art. 

A.B., M.F.A., Indiana University. 
VlCKERY, KATHERINE, 

Chairman, Professor of Psychology. 

A.B., North Georgia College; M.A., Ph.D., Peabody College; D.Sc. Alabama 
College. 

Weaver, Irvin W., 

Chairman, Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

B.A., B.D., Emory University; Ph.D., Boston University Graduate School. 

Whaley, Beulah, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

B.S., Birmingham-Southern; M.S., Alabama College. 

Whatley, Mary H., 

Associate Professor of Sociology. 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.S., University of North Carolina. 

Williams, Jimmie Nell, 

Assistant Librarian. 

B.S., Florence State College; M.A., George Peabody College. 

Wright, Laura, 

Chairman, Professor of Speech. 

B.A., College of St. Teresa; M.A., Marquette University; Ph.D., University 
of Wisconsin. 

tPart Time 



DIRECTORY 127 

OTHER OFFICERS AND STAFF MEMBERS 

Anderson, Lee, Technical-Clerical Assistant, Library 

Blackmon, Edna, Secretary to Dean of Women 

Blake, Edwin J., A.B., Supervisor, Faculty-Student Services 

Broadhead, Peggie, Technical Assistant, Typist 

Brown, Virginia, Secretary, Public Relations 

Cain, Dewey, House Director, Main Hall 

Chichester, Carolyn W., Technical-Clerical Assistant, Library 

Cobb, Betty E., B.S., Social Director and Assistant to Dean of Women 

Corbett, Ellen, Technical-Clerical Assistant, Library 

Culp, Clara Sue, Clerical Assistant, Business Office 

Davis, Phyllis, Technical Assistant, Registrar's Office 

Doyle, Mildred, Nurse 

Egerton, Mary McCoy, House Director, Main Hall 

Gleason, Mary T., M.A., Assistant Director, Speech and 

Hearing Clinic. 
Gooden, Barbara B., House Director, Hanson Hall 
Harris, Betty Joan, Clerical Assistant and Secretary to Registrar 
Harris, Mildred W., Technical Assistant, Psychology Department 
Hood, E. P., M.S., Men's Counselor and House Director, Napier Hall 
Hood, Mary, Manager of the Supply Store 
Houston, Eva D., Registered Nurse 
Huffstutler, Steve, A.B., Director of the News Bureau 
Jeter, Lena N., B.S., Secretary to the Dean 
Knowles, Linda L., A.B., Secretary to the Dean of Men 
Lazenby, Doris, Registered Nurse 
Lewis, Nora S., House Director, Tutwiler Hall 
Lovelady, Faye, Secretary, Alumni Office 
May, Mrs. Wert, Housemother, Speech and Hearing Clink 
Miller, Corinne, Typist, Student-Faculty Services 
Murphy, Mary J., Secretary, Director of Admissions and Recruitment 
Nichols, Alma, Bookkeeper 

Nix, Palma L., Assistant Supervisor, Food Services 
Price, Eunice H., Nurse 
Ratliff, Ruth M., Secretary to the President 
Turpin, Suzanne, Secretary, Biology Department 
Warnke, Minnie B., Cashier 
Weston, Essie, Technical Assistant, Registrar's Office 



128 ALABAMA COLLEGE 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Advanced Study Opportunities: Weaver, Irvin W., Chairman; Grif- 
fith, Lucille B.; Merij anian, Aris; Mount, Robert H. 

Advisory Committee to College Classes: To be elected by classes. 
Elected individuals to serve four years. 

Advisory Committee to President: Terms expire 1964: Davis, Max- 
ine; McMillan, D. R.; Weaver, Irvin. Terms expire 1965: Pal- 
mer, Chester; Sneed, Kate. 

Alumni: Sneed, Kate C, Chairman; Blackmon, Charlotte D.; Davis, 
Maxine C; Hendrick, Virginia; Lightsey, Sara Nell; Mathison, 
Laura F.; Meroney, Eloise; Myrick, Geneva; Rotenberry, Julia 
W.; Shirley, A. Neal; Whaley, Beulah H. 

Athletics: McMillan, D. R., Chairman; Anderson, Floyd V.; Black- 
mon, Fred C; Hood, E. P. (Robin); Jackson, Jesse J.; Palmer, 
Chester L.; Parnell, Leighton C; Turpin, Thomas D. 

College Night: Trumbauer, Willilee R., Chairman; Berry, Sara Lou; 
Chichester, W. T.; Folsom, Aubrey C; Graham, Jeanne F.; Huff- 
stutler, Stephen T.; Lightfoot, Frank K.; Morgan, Sarah P.; 
Spicer, John H.; Stewart, John W. 

Concert and Lectures: Sears, Ralph W., Chairman; Adams, Maria Jane; 
Chichester, W. T., Vice Chairman; Connell, James F. L.; Lumby, 
Betty Louise; McGurk, Frank C. J. 

Curriculum and Educational Policies: (Chairman to be elected). El- 
liott, Patricia Ann (acting chm.); Gormley, Charles L.; Kennedy, 
W. J.; Larkin, Mary M. (acting chm.); Lott, John B.; McMillan, 
D. R.; Morgan, Sarah P. (acting chm.); Palmer, Chester L.; 
Somers, Robert B.; Stewart, John B.; Thomas, James D.; Turner, 
Henry F.; Turpin, Thomas D.; Vickery, Katherine; Walters, 
John B., Jr.; Weaver, Irvin; Wright, Laura F. 

Dancy Lectures: Golson, Eva O., Chairman; Puryear, Sarah F.; 
Wright, Laura F. 

Graduate Study: Gormley, Charles L., Chairman; Cotter, David J.; 
Lott, John B.; Thomas, James D.; Walters, John B., Jr. (ex 
officio). 

Historical Records: Griffith, Lucille B., Chairman; Dunn, Minnie; 
Hendrick, Virginia; Larkin, Mary M.; Meroney, Eloise; Somers, 
Robert B. 



DIRECTORY 129 

Honors Day: Finger, Bernice R., Chairman; Barnes, Virginia W.; 
Bickham, Ethel L.; Cardone, Joseph M.; Flynn, Murray C; 
Guitart, Miguel A.; Oesterling, Marie Ann; Whaley, Beulah H. 

Honors Program of Study: Vickery, Katherine, Chairman; Cardone, 
Joseph M.; Griffith, Lucille B.; Lott, John B.; Mount, Robert 
H.; Walters, John B., Jr.; Wright, Laura F. 

Library: Cotter, David J., Chairman; Barclay, Lee A. (ex officio); 
Golson, Eva O.; Myrick, Geneva; Somers, Robert B.; Suttle, John 
F.; Tripplett, Reuben A. 

Publications: Huffstutler, Stephen F., Chairman; Adams, Maria Jane; 
Davis, Maxine C; Fancher, B. E.; Sledge, Eugene B.; Turpin, 
Thomas D. 

Scholarships and Awards: Wilkinson, James R., Chairman; Finger, 
Bernice R.; Morgan, Sarah P.; Paty, Adelaide P.; Stewart, John 
W. 

Social: Cobb, Betty E., Chairman; Allen, Martha; Bickham, Ethel L.; 
Crew, M. Jeanette; Dunn, Minnie; Edwards, Chrystine G.; Fol- 
som, Aubrey C; Folsom, Florence S.; Hernandez, Angela; Lar- 
kin, Mary M.; Owsley, Mabel M. 

Student Government Advisory: Collins, Miriam, Chairman; Fancher, 
B. E.; Owsley, Mabel M.; Paty, Adelaide P. (ex officio); Roe, 
Vivian I.; Shirley, A. Neal; Walters, John B., Jr. (ex officio); 
Whatley, Mary H.; Wilkinson, James R. (ex officio). 

Student Organizations: Blackmon, Fred C, Chairman; Anderson, Floyd 
V.; Paty, Adelaide P. (ex officio); Sears, Ralph W.; Tolbert, 
W. Bruce; Tripplett, Reuben A.; Walters, John B., Jr. (ex of- 
ficio); Whaley, Beulah H.; Wilkinson, James R. (ex officio). 

Vocational Guidance: Broxton, June A., Chairman; Gormley, Charles 
L.; Larkin, Mary M.; Oesterling, Marie Ann; Puryear, Sarah F.; 
Roe, Vivian I.; Stewart, John W.; Suttle, John F.; Whatley, Mary 
H. 



130 

DISTRICT SUPERVISORS OF HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Blackburn, Alice E., 

B.S., Alabama College; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Coe, Betty Jean, 

B.S., Auburn University; M.S., University of Alabama. 

Cotney, Evelyn, 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Dawson, Mattie Sue, 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., Iowa State College. 

Phillips, Ruby, 

B.S., M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
OFFICE STAFF OF HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

Erwin, Sara Lacey Porter, Lula 

Gardner, Frances Reid Wilson, Gulmer 



INDEX 



Absence Regulations, 109-110 

Acceleration, 115 

Accreditation, 9 

ACT, 11 

Administration, Officers of, 119 

Administration of the Curricula, 104 

Admission of Students and Registra- 
tion Procedures, 10-14 

Alumni Association, 35-36 

Anna Irvin Hall, 4 

Applications — 

For Admission, 10 

For Aid, 27 

For Condition Exams, 107 

For Degrees, 114 

Art, Announcements, 37-39 
Curriculum, 83 

Assistantships, 27 

Athletic Field, 5 

Audit, 105 

Automobiles, Registration, 13 

Basic Courses, 97 

Dentistry, 97 

Engineering, 68-69, 98 

Law, 97 

Medicine, 97 
Bibb Graves Hall, 1 
Bioloey, Announcements, 39-41 

Curricula, 84-85 
Bloch Hall, 1 
Board Room, 5 
Board of Trustees, 118 
Boarding Students, 15 
Buildings, 1-7 
Business Administration, 

Announcements. 42-44 

Curricula, 86-87 

Cafeteria, 4 
Calendar, vi 
Calkins Hall, 1 
Camp House, 5 
Campus 
Diagram, v 

Main, 1 
Certification, Teacher, 45, 46, 116 
Changes in Courses, 105 
Charges, Changes in, 17 
Chemistry, Announcements, 44-45 

Curriculum, 88 
Clubs, Organizations, 32-33 
College Calendar, vii 
College Night, 31 
Comer Hall, 1 
Commencement, vi, 114 
Concerts, Lectures and Plays, 31 
Condition Examinations, 107 
Conduct, 28 

Convocation Attendance, 110 
Cost of Attendance, 15-17 
Counseling and Guidance 

Curriculum, 100 
Course Load. 104 
Course Numbers, 104 
Courses Repeated, 105 
Credit Hour Requirements for 

Graduation, 113 
Curricula, 82-103 

Dancy Lectures, 32 
Debaters, 30 

Degrees and Curricula, 111 
Departments and Courses of 

Instruction, 37-81 
Directory, 118-129 
Drama, 29-30 



Economics, 71-73, 82 

Education Announcements, 45-48 

Electives, 111 

Curricula, 82, 89 
Elementary Education, 89 
Eligibility to Represent College, 109 
Emeriti, 119 
Employment, 18 
Engineering, Basic, 

Announcements, 68 

Curriculum, 98 
English Announcements, 48-50, 82 
Entrance Requirements, 10-14, 113 
European Seminar, 117 
Examinations, Admission by, 12 
Examinations, Condition, 107 
Examinations, Failure to Take 

Final, 107 
Exclusion, Statement of, 28 
Expenses, 15-17 

Faculty Club House, 5 

Faculty, Officers, and Staff, 119-127 

Faculty Committees, 128-129 

Faculty Housing, 5 

Fees, 15-17 

Financial Aid, 18-27 

Fire Protection, 5 

Food Services, 34 

Foreign Language Announcements, 

50-51, 82 
Freshman Orientation, 13-14 

General Education Requirements, 113 

Geography, 73 

Geology, 1, 41 

Golf Course, 5 

Government, Student, 28 

Grade Points, 106 

Grades, 106 

Grades and Records, 105-106 

Graduate Program for Teachers, 116 

Graduation Fee, 17 

Graduation Requirements, 114-116 

Gymnasium Suit, 17 

Health Services, 34 

Health, Physical Education and 

Recreation, 

Announcements, 52-56 

Curriculum, 90 
Historical Statement, 8 
History, 73-75, 82 
History and Present Status, 8-9 
Holidays, 33 
Home Economics, 

Announcements, 57-61 

Curricula, 91-92 
Honor Code, 28 
Honors Program, 117 
Honor Societies, 33 
Honors, 106 

Hours, Unit of Credit, 104 
Housing, 14 
Identification Card, 13 
Incompletes, 106 
Infirmary, 6, 34 
Institution Economics, 92 
Interdepartmental Minors, 111-112 

Child Care, 111 

General Science, 112 
King House, 2 
Laboratories, 2-3 

Art, 2 

Biology, 2 

Chemistry, 3 

Home Economics, 3 

Physics, 2 



INDEX 



Lake, 6 

Late Registration, 13, 16 

Laundry, 6 

Liberal Arts Curriculum, 82 

Library, 3 

Loan Funds, 23-27 

Local Students, 15-16 

Location and Physical Facilities, 7 

Main Hall, 6 
Major, 111 
Mathematics, 

Announcements, 66-69 

Curriculum, 93 
Meals, 15 
Medical Service, 16 
Medical Technicians Course, 85 
Minor, 111 

Motor Vehicle Registration, 13 
Music, Department of, 

Announcements, 61-62 

Curricula, 82, 94-96 

Fees, 16-17 
Musical Activities, 31 

Nursery School, 2 

Objectives of College, 9 
Operations Building, 6 
Organizations, Clubs, 32-33 
Orientation, Freshman, 13 
Out-of-State Students, 16 

Palmer Hall, 2 

Pasteurization Plant, 5 

Peterson Hall, 6 

Philosophy and Religion, 64-65 

Physical Education (See Health, 

Physical Education and Recrea- 
tion) 
Physician, College, 34 
Physics Building, 2 
Ptiysics and Mathematics Announce- 
ments, 66-69 
Placement Bureaus, 34 
Political Science, 75-76, 82 
Power House, 6 
Practice Home, 2 
Present Status of College, 9 
Practice Teaching, 

Adjustment in Charges, 17 
President's Residence, 6 
Psychology, 

Announcements, 69-71 
Curricula, 99-100 
Publications 

Student, 29 
Alabamian, 29 
Tower, 29 
Montage, 29 
College, 35 
Bulletin, 35 
News Letter, 35 
Student Handbook, 35 
Student-Faculty Directory, 35 
Weekly Bulletin, 35 

Radio and Television, 30, 81 
Readmission, 13 
Records, 106 



Recreation, 28-29 

Reentering after Scholastic Sus- 
pension, 108 

Refunds, 17 

Registration, 10-13 

Religion, Philosophy, 64-65 

Religious Life, 32 

Reports, 105 

Representing the College, 109 

Requirements for Admission, 11-12, 
113 

Requirements for Graduation, 114-116 

Residence Halls, 4, 5 

Residence Requirements for Gradua- 
tion, 114 

Retail Economics, 92 

Reynolds Hall, 6 

Room Reservation, 14 

Scholarships, 18-23 
Scholastic Probation, 107 
Scholastic Standards, 107-108 
Scholastic Suspension, 108 
Secondary Education, 82 
Secretarial Administration Curricu- 
lum, 87 
Semester System, 104 
Social Life, 28-29 
Social Science, 76, 82 
Social Science Building, 2 
Social Sciences, Department of, 

Announcements, 71-78 

Curriculum, 82 
Sociology, 76-78 

Curriculum, 82, 101 
Special Services, 34-36 
Special Students, 12 
Speech and Dramatics, 

Announcements, 78-80 

Clinic, 34-35 

Curricula, 102-103 
Speech and Hearing Clinic, 2, 34-35 
Speech Correction, 103 
Sports Field, 7 
Student Aid, 17 
Student Government, 28 
Student Life and Activities, 28-33 
Summary of Information, Inside Cover 
Summer School, Inside Back Cover 
Supply Store and Tea Room, 7 
Swimming Pool, 2 
Teacher Certification, 45, 46, 116 
Testing, 11, 34 
Theatre, 7-8, 29-30, 80 

Palmer, 7 

Reynolds, 7 
Tower, 6 

Transcript of Records, 106-107 
Transfer Students, 12, 114 
Trustees, Board of, 118 

Unit of Credit, 104 

Vehicle Registration, 13 
Vocational Home Economics, 91 
Vocational Guidance, 34 

Water Supply, 7 
Withdrawal, 17, 109 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1964 

First Term June 8-July 11 

Second Term July 13-August 15 



COURSES OFFERED 

Work will be offered in approved regular college courses 
leading toward a degree, and for the issuance, continuance and 
reinstatement of teachers' certificate. 

Special courses will be given in home economics, physical 
education, music, business administration, art, sociology, and 
speech. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Alabama College will offer graduate work leading to the 
Master of Arts Degree in Teaching and to the Class A Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Professional Certificates. 



SCIENCE INSTITUTE 

Sixty scholarships available. Sponsored by National Science 
Foundation. 

For detailed information as to Summer School arrangements, 
including courses of study and expense, a copy of the Summer 
School Bulletin should be requested of the Director. 




I l i 



TIMES PRINTING CO. 

MONTIVAUO. AlA